Just bought a 2003 sugar 3+ how much it weigh??- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1

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    Listen! Just bought a 2003 sugar 3+ how much it weigh??

    Hi,
    i just bought myself a 2003 garry fisher sugar 3+. I dont have a set of scales at home, but just wondering if anyone knew the weight of these?

    Im new to all of this really, what can you do to a bike to make it lighter apart from getting a grinder out

    Regards
    Frank

  2. #2
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    Don't bother just yet!!!

    Don't bother worrying about saving weight on your bike just yet..

    The best ways to save weight are the simple things that one usually changes because of personal preference. ie:
    • Saddle
    • Seatpost and stem (Sometimes)
    • Tubes and tires. ie Using normal tires and latex etc
    • Grips (Foam makes a 60-80g saving depending on what you have)
    • Pedals (You can make nice savings if you get Twin Ti eggs etc)


    Nice bike for sure. You gotta post pics and a ride report!

  3. #3

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    ... and if we just ...




    this is a pic of my bike.... i absolutely love it, had a test ride of a Fuel 80, Nrs2, but this was alot more comfortable for me. It was basically between this and the nrs2. The warranty on this swayed me more. I got a great deal too. $3000, retail was $3900. But clarence street cyclery (sydney, australia) were great Threw in a computer too. Only had it one day so cant really say too much, im a recreational rider. I was after a bike i could ride comfortably all day, and this was it. I did change the stem angle to one with a great angle. But the rear shock adjustability is great. And i love the front shock, although im thinking of getting stiffer springs, or losing weight on my body. See what happens first

  4. #4

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    Congrats on the new bike! That is definitely the coolest paint job Gary Fisher ever put on a bike. As for cutting weight, listen to Trevor. Hold off on it for now. The only thing you immediately need to do to the bike is get rid of those flat pedals! Get some kind of clipless pedal and you'll save some weight, and it'll be a nice performance booster.

    Now, come to think of it, I think Mountain Bike magazine did a review of it a little while back. They probably have the weight posted. If I can dig up the issue this evening, I'll post back with the weight.

    Now you go out and get that thing dirty!

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by DudeOnABike
    Congrats on the new bike! That is definitely the coolest paint job Gary Fisher ever put on a bike. As for cutting weight, listen to Trevor. Hold off on it for now. The only thing you immediately need to do to the bike is get rid of those flat pedals! Get some kind of clipless pedal and you'll save some weight, and it'll be a nice performance booster.

    Now, come to think of it, I think Mountain Bike magazine did a review of it a little while back. They probably have the weight posted. If I can dig up the issue this evening, I'll post back with the weight.

    Now you go out and get that thing dirty!
    I actually would have liked a simpler paint job. but doesnt bother me too much. With them pedals, i got the shop to change those clipless pedals to normal flat pedals. I hate clipless pedals. although i might try and find some lighter ones later anyway. i don't really like the silver............and im still trying to get the confidence to take this thing off road....its nice having a nice new shiny bike.

  6. #6
    No longer 26
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    Cool-blue Rhythm Love the 3+

    My Large frame weighed in at 6# even with disc adapter on back. Customer built it to 26# even right now. I could easily throw $ at it to get it in the 24-25 pound range but I can't justify at this time. It is a great bike. I ride in the 4" mode exclusively even at races.

    If you have chaisuck issues and are willing to change a few things, try Sram derailluers and shifters. I think the chain bounces around less with my Sram X.0 derailluer than Shimano and I have not had the problem.

    BTW, I have visited Clarence St Cycles and own their Aussie colors shop jersey. Wish I could get there on an MTB vacation.

    Cheers Mate!
    Greg

  7. #7
    T 3
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    Good job! Ouuuuucccchhhh !!!

    Quote Originally Posted by roidboy
    Hi,
    i just bought myself a 2003 garry fisher sugar 3+. I dont have a set of scales at home, but just wondering if anyone knew the weight of these?

    Im new to all of this really, what can you do to a bike to make it lighter apart from getting a grinder out

    Regards
    Frank
    Hope you gave that Sugar 3+ some anesthesia before the surgery ! ( just kidding ! )
    Rather than get the grinder out,I photoshopped a few grams off along with some other things,here ya go, get it nice and muddy and have fun !
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    Last edited by T 3; 01-15-2004 at 11:45 PM. Reason: comment

  8. #8

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    ha, nice job with the stem, i was looking at it wondering why it was all blurred around the handlebars. Then realised what you did. Bought bar ends for it today. Its been raining last few days. So when the rain quits the *****umen gonna get a good workout.........(im gonna get alot of abuse for that now).....it will go through some dirt...eventually......just not now. Doenst make sense i know, but i love looking at it while its all clean......which brings me to ask, How do you keep your bikes clean?

  9. #9

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    woah, just weighed my bike, and if it is accurate, i got 32.6 pounds......needs to loose a bit of weight......

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by roidboy
    I actually would have liked a simpler paint job. but doesnt bother me too much. With them pedals, i got the shop to change those clipless pedals to normal flat pedals. I hate clipless pedals. although i might try and find some lighter ones later anyway. i don't really like the silver............and im still trying to get the confidence to take this thing off road....its nice having a nice new shiny bike.
    I have to encourage you here - Get clipless pedals.

    I was in the same boat when I bought my first ever mountain bike, a giant NRS2, about 15 months ago. I was so terribly afraid of clipless pedals, in fact I didn't even know how to put the cleats on the shoes, and when i worked out how to I couldn't for the life of me work out how to get the shoes to lock into the pedals. A few instructions from the LBS and I was set. I spent the day in the garden working out how to use the pedals. I fell on the grass, almost fell and then hit the road and just kept moving forward and then I hit some dusty trail and managed OK. I clipped out before anything sketchy and here I am 15 months later loving clipless pedals and being totally challenged without them.

    Give them a go, its tough for about a day, easier after a week, and second nature by a fortnight. After a month you'll wonder why you didn't convert earlier.

    Trevor!
    (Wishing his Eggbeaters would keep him more locked in)

  11. #11
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    2000 sugar 3 @ 24.5

    Quote Originally Posted by roidboy
    woah, just weighed my bike, and if it is accurate, i got 32.6 pounds......needs to loose a bit of weight......
    i took my sugar on a diet and got new wheel set/tires/tubes,seat/post,handlebars/stem and got Ti bolts for the suspension (saved about 2-3 oz alone).didnt have to spend too much money to save some lbs..

  12. #12

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    so it is possible to get almost 5kgs (10-12 pounds) of these things??? that just seems like heaps

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Trevor!
    I have to encourage you here - Get clipless pedals.

    I was in the same boat when I bought my first ever mountain bike, a giant NRS2, about 15 months ago. I was so terribly afraid of clipless pedals, in fact I didn't even know how to put the cleats on the shoes, and when i worked out how to I couldn't for the life of me work out how to get the shoes to lock into the pedals. A few instructions from the LBS and I was set. I spent the day in the garden working out how to use the pedals. I fell on the grass, almost fell and then hit the road and just kept moving forward and then I hit some dusty trail and managed OK. I clipped out before anything sketchy and here I am 15 months later loving clipless pedals and being totally challenged without them.

    Give them a go, its tough for about a day, easier after a week, and second nature by a fortnight. After a month you'll wonder why you didn't convert earlier.

    Trevor!
    (Wishing his Eggbeaters would keep him more locked in)
    ill have to think about it that, im sure they might be better, but don't know if i could "relax" on the bike with the clipless.

  14. #14
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    roidboy,
    you paid 3 g's for a sugar 3 ? we have a shop here and that same bike retails at 1399.00

    dirt diggler

    btw. i couldn't make up mind on the sugar and nrs so i bought them both.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by dirt diggler
    roidboy,
    you paid 3 g's for a sugar 3 ? we have a shop here and that same bike retails at 1399.00

    dirt diggler

    btw. i couldn't make up mind on the sugar and nrs so i bought them both.
    $3000 AUSTRALIAN DOLLARS, remembering our currency is pretty close to half what urs is, then stamp duty and other taxes the friken government feel like adding. assuming ur american. Retail was $3900 but i paid $3000, SO I SAVED $900 AUSSIE DOLLARS. (approx $400 - 500 US)

    Yeah i was deciding on both the nrs and sugar at the end, but the 5 yr warranty on giant wasnt enough for me. Now i got Lifetime on frame, 5yr parts and one year free servicing.
    Im sure the frame would last forever but just in case i needed the reassurance.

  16. #16
    T 3
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    No not that much...

    Quote Originally Posted by roidboy
    so it is possible to get almost 5kgs (10-12 pounds) of these things??? that just seems like heaps
    There's people on this forum more knowledgeable about achieving optimal weight than me,but here's an opinion:Realistically,you can probably knock about 5 pounds or so off it and still have it be a bike you'll enjoy...

    As far as pedals,Trevor's advise was great,What I would highly recomend is that you try something like this:Shimano makes reasonably priced pedals that come with a strong plastic platform that clips into the pedal,that would let you even ride barefooted if you wanted to and at least let you get more familiar with your bike.Later on you can pop the plastic platform off ,clip yourself in and try Trevor's method to get used to them.Another advantage of the Shimanos is that you can set the clip tenision VERY LOOSE and feel more secure about your ability to get out.I started out with Shamino 515's.Later on if you want something much smoother,lighter etc there's lots of fantastic options.I'm the same as Trevor on choosing Eggbeater pedals....
    Last edited by T 3; 01-16-2004 at 04:32 PM. Reason: additional info

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    maybe this is one of those dumb questions, but what exactly is the point of clipless pedals, i mean, i dont like the toe clip around my foot, and what is the reason that makes pedals with that mechanism thing better to ride?? i dont understand because, my foot has never come off the pedal

  18. #18
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    i had the same attitude until i tried clipless pedals and shoes out. all my friends kept telling me how much better the pedaling was but i never really got it until i actually did it. i still don't use the clipless shoes all the time, but if i'm doing a flatter trail or i'm climbing more than descending they really help. you really can feel your legs pulling up on the crank. plus it's not that hard to get out if you have the tension set up really loose.

  19. #19
    T 3
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    Clip 'in away

    Quote Originally Posted by roidboy
    maybe this is one of those dumb questions, but what exactly is the point of clipless pedals, i mean, i dont like the toe clip around my foot, and what is the reason that makes pedals with that mechanism thing better to ride?? i dont understand because, my foot has never come off the pedal
    Here's a couple of articles that may shed some light on this and a picture of the inexpensive Shimano 515's that accept a plastic platform option.( That would permit you to gradually acclimate yourself )and still probably be lighter than what you're using now.Clipless is a lot more efficient---definitely let me ride further,faster with less fatigue.Maybe they aren't right for you,no point in pushing yourself into something you aren't comfortable with,the most important thing is to have fun.You purchased a really beautiful bike,there's only a few MTB's I'd consider owning and Sugar is absolutely one of them,riding it clipless will help you to realize it's potential to the fullest.

    This sums it up for me ---> With clipless pedals,my form lets me produce maximum power with every rotation of the crank.When there is NOTHING to secure my foot to the pedal,a certain percentage of my pedaling technique must be devoted to applying pressure to the pedal that prevents me from slipping off,but does not contribute to rotating the crank.That means less efficient,less power and more work for me to climb a hill etc,etc.

    Hope the info below helps...

    Should I try clipless pedals??

    First let's answer the question "What exactly are clipless pedals?":

    Clipless pedals operate much like a ski binding. They use a cleat that bolts on to the bottom of a shoe made for use with these pedals. The pedal itself has a spring loaded mechanism that cinches around the cleat when you step down onto the pedal. The mechanism is released when you turn your heel to the outside. The amount of spring tension--and therefore the effort required to get into and out of the pedals--is adjustable. (This is somewhat oversimplified; some pedals may use a slightly different concept, but all are basically similar.)

    Now let's cut to the chase: Should you be riding these pedals?

    Clipless pedals give several advantages:

    1) They allow you to more easily use all of your leg muscles to move your pedals. Instead of just pushing down, you can also pull up on the pedals. Your pedaling becomes more effficient.
    2) They are actually generally easier to get into and out of than toe-clip style pedals. Because you don't have to flip the pedal over and wiggle your foot into the clip, they are easier to get into. And because you don't have to release the straps and wiggle your foot out, they're easier to get out of.
    3) On a mountain bike in particular they can give you more control over the bike because you are firmly attached to your pedals and don't have to worry about having your feet bounced off the pedals by rough terrain.

    And the disadvantages:

    1) You have to have a special shoe that accepts the cleat. This means that riding your bike without these special shoes on is much more difficult and unless you're just riding to the end of the block, you probably don't want to do it.
    2) Clipless pedals take some getting used to. We tell customers to count on falling a few times when they forget that they have to rotate their heel to release the mechanism.
    3) The spring mechanisms take some maintenance-- generally just keeping them cleaned and lubed--and the cleats do wear out over time.

    We really believe in the benefits of clipless pedals, so let's address those disadvantages:

    1) SPECIAL SHOES: Yes, you're going to have to buy new shoes to go with your clipless pedals. But hey, we all love new shoes, right?? And if you're concerned about the ability to ride with regular old shoes on (like in case you need to cruise to the coffee shop a few blocks away each morning to grab some "motivation") there are pedals that have a clipless mechanism on one side and a regular old flat pedal on the other.
    2) GETTING USED TO CLIPLESS: The adjustable entry and release tension plays a huge role here. With the tension on the easiest setting, these pedals are really easy to get out of. It's only a matter of a turning a screw with a 3mm allen key to adjust most pedals. We also recommend riding around a parking lot or grassy field for a while to get used to the action of clipping in and clipping out. After a few hours of riding, all this will be second nature.
    3) MAINTENANCE: The maintenance of clipless pedals is no harder than lubing a chain. And the cleats last a long time, well over a year for most people.

    Most people who've made the switch will say it's well worth the learning curve. You can ride longer, faster, and in more control with clipless pedals.

    To SPD or not to SPD By Rob Doick

    My Cannondale came factory fitted with some Welgo rat traps, you know the sort of thing, serrated edges for scratching your legs and straps that are bloody difficult to get into at the best of times. Now I'm sure there are people out there that get on perfectly well with these things - but I'm not one of them. They sit somewhere between being a clipless system and being a flat pedal - but without the advantages of either. If you want to be fully 'connected' to the pedal, the straps have to be so tight you can't get out - even with advance warning!
    So the time had arrived for the very first change to my bike - The pedals. But, which way to go?

    When I sat down and thought about, I love downhill (Who doesn't!) so flatties it is, but then again what about singletrack (Either), fire roads (Clipless) and climbs (Clipless). Then as I flicked through the mags I saw a mix of both in all sorts of uses - clipless on Downhill, flatties on Freeride...

    So next, on to my peers - they all had clipless pedals, and I did struggle stopping and starting on climbs, while they seemed to 'clip-in' with ease and be off again. Also I suffered on climbs so the improved throughput of power seemed appealing. The only thing holding me back was fear - Will I be able to 'clip-out' in time? What happens when I crash? What about my confidence on downhills?

    Once I had seen an advert for some cheap Shimano M515's and M151's I bit the bullet and decided to go SPD. And like any sensible person, I did this with about a month to go until our trip to Snowdon. So I needed to get used to these funny little pods where my peddles used to be pretty quick!

    The obvious place to go for my first outing was Leith Hill, including the Widowmaker - on my first visit there. I think that Jimbo and Dave had more fun than I did - mainly due to laughing at me. First off, I'd adjusted them the wrong way so that they were overly tight, which really helped with clipping in and out (And I used to be an engineer). But it must be said that the combination of a stiff sole, and the direct application of power were noticed immediately on climbs and when putting the hammer down. However, the fear of falling was still present.

    After 3 hours of riding that fear had vanished, there was no point in fearing falling when I was doing it so regularly! This was best displayed when I attempted a descent at the car park, which I recovered despite making a mistake, only to come to a skidding halt in the car park and then topple over sideways whilst still 'clipped-in'. But, once you ignore things like this, it is well worth the effort - for the improved responsiveness at the cranks. To be honest, I don't notice my clipless pedals at all now, even on downhills, and I don't have to piss about with straps or the like. I can also bail just as quickly as I could with flatties on the trail, check out my crash in Wales for proof - I managed to unclip and land nowhere near the bike. (Still broke his elbow though - Jim.)

    At the end of the day, the decision is yours, and it will depend on the style of riding that you are going to be doing (Clipless will not help your hippity hoppity), but for general trail riding I say go SPD.

    http://www.sussex-mtb.com/reviews/Clipless.htm
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    Last edited by T 3; 01-16-2004 at 08:35 PM. Reason: additional comment

  20. #20
    Get your freak on!
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    Smile Not only the pedaling, but..

    You also get more controll while going downhill, altohugh you might feel less confident in the real tech stuff it still gives you more control. Also you can bunny hop and lift the rear wheel over things alot easier. Another bonus is that you won't have blood red socks from your shins(work it out).


  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by bike_freak
    You also get more controll while going downhill, altohugh you might feel less confident in the real tech stuff it still gives you more control. Also you can bunny hop and lift the rear wheel over things alot easier. Another bonus is that you won't have blood red socks from your shins(work it out).
    Clipless pedals allow the bike to become an extension of me

    bike_freak really has said what I was thinking. Pedals give you greater control of your bike and in particular help with you becoming more nimble in technical sections or in DH sections. Some DH (Not FR) MTBrs actually use clipless because of the control they get on their bikes. The bike becomes part of you...

    I am challenged when I get on a bike with platforms.

    Trevor!

  22. #22

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    now i can see the logic, i can see the efficiency it would have while pedaling. In the future i may get some, they actually seem like they would be effective. For now i've spent too much money to be worried about clipless. But when i feel like spending some money on my bike ill now know y clipless is a good thing.

    Another question. Why they call them clipless when they have clip?

  23. #23
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    IMO Speedplay Frogs are the Best!

    I had SPD clipless when I first started riding clipless. I liked them at first but then started getting knee pain after 2 hour rides. Talked to a buddy who rides and found out the issue is probably the amount float. Float is the term that describes how much your ankle/foot can move while still clipped in. Most SPD are 4 to 6 degrees of float. But, w speedplay, you get around 14 to 16 degrees. Made a huge difference! No knee pain even after 4 hour epics. And, they are easier to get out of in tough situations. The other advantage of the Frogs is that they have a small rubber platform that you can unclip and pedal if you think you are going to have to bail (esp. downhill).

    And as for advantages of clippless in general, the previous posts from everyone is right on the mark. To have a nive ride like that and not use all the power you can would be a cryin shame. Have fun!

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