Help me save some weight.- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Help me save some weight.

    Heres my ride.

    Giant NRS3 frame (with giant proprietry air shock) + 4.5 inch travel rocker arms
    Canecreek something headset
    Thompson elite stem and seatpost. (seatpost cut down to minimum)
    Specialised BG saddle.
    Easton monkeylite XC bars
    ODI ruffian lockon grips.
    XT Dualcontrol shifters/brake lever
    XT hydros
    XT hollowtech II cranks (44-34-22, I think)
    XT rd (long cage)
    XT fd
    XT cassette (11-34)
    cn-7701 chain
    Crossmax enduro wheelset
    Kenda Nevegal lite tires.
    Rockshox Reba team fork (w poploc adjust)

    Can anyone suggest doing anything to shave somemore weight?

  2. #2
    Ex-Gunslinger
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    So what does it weigh?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Laika
    So what does it weigh?
    Somewhere between 25-26 pounds.

    Oh yeah, forgot to mention the pedals. Shimano pd-m959.

    Derek.

  4. #4
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    Foam grips and a syntace stem(or similiar).

    Maybe also look at getting some new wheels?


  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by bike_freak
    Foam grips and a syntace stem(or similiar).

    Maybe also look at getting some new wheels?
    Wheels sound more like it, but the really light ones are so expensive... Crossmax enduros already set me back a huge amount.

    Anyone know how tough Stans rims are compared to crossmaxes? How do the crossmax sl and enduro compare to each other? How is the weight comparison between sl and stans?

    Besides the wheels, it seems there is little else I could do...

  6. #6
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    Theres the seapost, stem, grips, saddle and brakes there to save some weight.

    But the wheels would probably be the most noticable difference.


  7. #7
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    I am currently using the Nevegal lite. Although they are called 'lite' they weight over 560g....that ain't lite! I am using due to the muddy winter in Australia, however as soon as the tracks dry out, I will be going back to my Karmas or try some Blue Grooves. They are about 460g each! That will save an instant 200g off your ride.

    The rest of your build ie XT stuff is strong, reliable and good quality, but it too is not light. I am currently using XT hydros too, but find them good value for money, especially considering the stopping power and modulation. I am happy to give a little weight penalty here for good brakes. Again, Thomson stuff, excellent, expensive, bling but not very light.... light but not 'light'. Personally again, I think it is worth it, however you could go a syntace 99 etc.

    Overall, cheapest upgrade that will make the most difference, new tires. Wheels etc are expensive.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by ryan123
    I am currently using the Nevegal lite. Although they are called 'lite' they weight over 560g....that ain't lite! I am using due to the muddy winter in Australia, however as soon as the tracks dry out, I will be going back to my Karmas or try some Blue Grooves. They are about 460g each! That will save an instant 200g off your ride.

    The rest of your build ie XT stuff is strong, reliable and good quality, but it too is not light. I am currently using XT hydros too, but find them good value for money, especially considering the stopping power and modulation. I am happy to give a little weight penalty here for good brakes. Again, Thomson stuff, excellent, expensive, bling but not very light.... light but not 'light'. Personally again, I think it is worth it, however you could go a syntace 99 etc.

    Overall, cheapest upgrade that will make the most difference, new tires. Wheels etc are expensive.
    Thanks dude, will keep an eye out for the other Kendas. Kendas are hard to find over in this part of the world...

  9. #9
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    If you have the $$$ , besides lighter wheels

    Ritchey WCS stem around 100g vs 220g+ Thomson,
    Selle Italia SLR 135g vs Spec. BG 300g+ ,

    SLR's came with my new road bike and to my amazement I could do 60 miles on the road with no problems. They should be fine with FS bike and shorts with chamois on the trails.I don't recommend it for hardtails.

    Get lightest pedals you can, you can always keep them even if you sell the bike, I paid top $ for 3ti egg beaters , 185g a pair.

    You can also run light tubes , performance has crazy lite lunars that weigh in 90g or so butly not stupid latex. If you ride smooth trails , kenda has klimax lite tires 1.95" size in 345g. DON'T use them in rocky trails because sidewalls are so thin you will keep on getting snake bites. They also wear out way too fast.

    As you can see weight reduction has high $$$ and durability sacrifices.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by stoked
    If you have the $$$ , besides lighter wheels

    Ritchey WCS stem around 100g vs 220g+ Thomson,
    Selle Italia SLR 135g vs Spec. BG 300g+ ,

    SLR's came with my new road bike and to my amazement I could do 60 miles on the road with no problems. They should be fine with FS bike and shorts with chamois on the trails.I don't recommend it for hardtails.

    Get lightest pedals you can, you can always keep them even if you sell the bike, I paid top $ for 3ti egg beaters , 185g a pair.

    You can also run light tubes , performance has crazy lite lunars that weigh in 90g or so butly not stupid latex. If you ride smooth trails , kenda has klimax lite tires 1.95" size in 345g. DON'T use them in rocky trails because sidewalls are so thin you will keep on getting snake bites. They also wear out way too fast.

    As you can see weight reduction has high $$$ and durability sacrifices.
    Thanks for your reply. I'll keep a lookout for the stem and saddle. May look into getting a carbon seatpost as well. I'm running Nevegal lites as tubeless with Stans at the mo, so no heavy tube in there for me. Didnt use stans rimstrips either since the xmax rims are already UST rims.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by pjmaxon
    Some of your components have high resale values, esp. the wheels and the thompson items. If you sold them first, you could replace them much more cheeply.
    Will be trying that. But not being able to use Ebay as a practical solution limits my options. (I live in southeast asia, shipping is a killer)

  12. #12
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    Don't forget

    Quote Originally Posted by leleklegrunt
    Thanks for your reply. I'll keep a lookout for the stem and saddle. May look into getting a carbon seatpost as well. I'm running Nevegal lites as tubeless with Stans at the mo, so no heavy tube in there for me. Didnt use stans rimstrips either since the xmax rims are already UST rims.
    Some of your components have high resale values, esp. the wheels and the thompson items. If you sold them first, you could replace them much more cheeply.

  13. #13
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    you could get weight of most components at www.weightweenies.starbike.com. I would stay away from carbon anything on a MTB. One spill and here goes your expensive part.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by stoked
    you could get weight of most components at www.weightweenies.starbike.com. I would stay away from carbon anything on a MTB. One spill and here goes your expensive part.
    True, true...
    Whats lighter than a thomson post, but still non-carbon?

  15. #15
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    Put an SDG seat and post on. You can stick a 120g fully padded I-Fly seat with the 230g. Aluminum seat post. I-Fly seat is totally comfortable!
    Otherwise go on a diet!! Why spend TONS of $$$ when you can just go ride and loose 5 lbs. lets see you drop that off your bike. I found that by loosing 10lbs, from 175 to 165 lbs. I rode a lot better, the bike didn't change so the cost was $0 and my overall riding weight (bike+rider) went down 4536 grams!!!
    Next time you consider spending a ton of $$$ to cut 40-50grams think twice about taking desert instead.
    www.mudrider.blogspot.com

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by leleklegrunt
    True, true...
    Whats lighter than a thomson post, but still non-carbon?
    I like my thompson seatpost. Are you using yours with a shim or do you have the exact size?

    Replace your stem, don't bother with the Ritchey WSC stem, the Syntace f99 is lighter and cheaper(?).

    There a some parts that do fine in carbon , lots of people don't have any problems running carbon bars, but it is a personal preferance thing. The truth is, if you have a hard enough crash to damage your carbon bar, theres a good chance you should be replacing your light weigh Aluminium bar too!


  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by bike_freak
    I like my thompson seatpost. Are you using yours with a shim or do you have the exact size?

    Replace your stem, don't bother with the Ritchey WSC stem, the Syntace f99 is lighter and cheaper(?).

    There a some parts that do fine in carbon , lots of people don't have any problems running carbon bars, but it is a personal preferance thing. The truth is, if you have a hard enough crash to damage your carbon bar, theres a good chance you should be replacing your light weigh Aluminium bar too!
    I'm using the exact size without the shim. My bike came with an original Giant seatpost without a shim, so at first, I had no idea what people meant when they said "shim"... Then when I bought an XTC frame and THAT came with a shim, that was only then I realised what it was all about.
    Whats the deal with shims anyway? Why do people use them? Is it so you can use a thinner (lighter?) post in a fat frame?

  18. #18
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    Look around for a carbon seat post, I purchased a used Easton CT2 for $40 USD (off ebay but that doesn't help you). Carbon is a hot topic, a lot of people slam its usage in MTB. I have put 1000 km on a hardtail with this post and it's fine. I weigh 210 lbs. Highly recommend. Check out Continental superlight tubes at 100 g each.
    I made a spreadsheet to summarize my possible weight reductions and the cost for each option. Like purchasing the CT2 saved me 100g, so it cost me 40 cents per/gram. Put your options down on paper and see where you come out. As per above; seatpost, tubes and tires are a great place to start. Don't forget about the water cage, seat pack, and cycle computer.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by stoked
    you could get weight of most components at www.weightweenies.starbike.com. I would stay away from carbon anything on a MTB. One spill and here goes your expensive part.
    Carbon is not that delicate. I've had a Maxm MX-1 handlebar and EC-70 seatpost on my bike for 2 years, with numerous spills and no failure. Technically, carbon fiber is stronger than aluminum, but when it fails it does so catastrophically. But you are right in that aluminum is a safer choice, especially if a person is in Southeast Asia where parts (and doctors) are hard to come by.
    Last edited by DaFireMedic; 08-13-2005 at 10:16 PM.
    If you want to play with electricity, more power to ya......

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaFireMedic
    Carbon is not that delicate. I've had a Maxm MX-1 handlebar and EC-70 seatpost on my bike for 2 years, with numerous spills and no failure. Technically, carbon fiber is stronger than aluminum, but when it fails it does so catastrophically. But you are right in that aluminum is a safer choice, especially if a person is in Southeast Asia where parts (and doctors) are hard to come by.
    Oh, doctors are aplenty where I am (Kuala Lumpur), its the parts that are bummer. The second hand market here is tiny, so most parts have to be bought new.
    Question on carbon posts. Do I need to replace the quick release collar with a standard hex nut one and use a torque wrench? Or can I treat it exactly like my aluminium one, and raise and lower as and when I see fit on the trail?

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by leleklegrunt
    Oh, doctors are aplenty where I am (Kuala Lumpur), its the parts that are bummer. The second hand market here is tiny, so most parts have to be bought new.
    Question on carbon posts. Do I need to replace the quick release collar with a standard hex nut one and use a torque wrench? Or can I treat it exactly like my aluminium one, and raise and lower as and when I see fit on the trail?
    If you will be raising and lowering the post fairly often, I would go with aluminum. Carbon fiber has incredible strength, until a weak spot occurs in it, such as scoring that might happen by clamping and unclamping often. You can use the same collar, but I prefer to have a hex bolt so that I can use a torque wrench. I never change my seat height.

    Based on what you have said, go with the aluminum. The weight penalty is insignificant compared to the reliability and versatility that you are seeking.
    If you want to play with electricity, more power to ya......

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaFireMedic
    Based on what you have said, go with the aluminum. The weight penalty is insignificant compared to the reliability and versatility that you are seeking.
    Thats what I thought... Thanks for sharing...

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