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  1. #1
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    Help me lose weight

    Currently I have a 2012 Epic Comp Carbon 29er stock except
    XO front rear Derailleurs, XO shifters, X9 bb30 crankset, stans arch wheels ZTR hubs, Thomson masterpiece seat-post, wtb rocket v slt saddle, swabble racing ralph front tire performance forte spd pedals, OSI grips - weight is 25.10lbs. I want it lower. But I don't want to spend a ton of cash. All I can think of is changing the Cassette to (XX), chain,to (?) handlebars to carbon, maybe a lighter stem, maybe some TI bolts in various places?? so my question is?
    1. are there any cost effective tricks for lowering the weight?
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    stop dringking beer

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    That looks like it's about as light as you'll get it. Could go with Crests if you're not too big. Carbon bars would help. So would a lighter cassette. Check out fairwheelbikes.com if you want to get crazy.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by ryguy135 View Post
    That looks like it's about as light as you'll get it. Could go with Crests if you're not too big. Carbon bars would help. So would a lighter cassette. Check out fairwheelbikes.com if you want to get crazy.
    Dang that stinks I wanted to get down to 21lbs or so. I think I'll upgrade the chain, bars and cassette, and maybe TI bolts all around - brake bolts, thomson seatpost bolts, stem bolts, headset bolt, derailleur bolts, and bottle cage bolts.
    Any recommendations on Flat strong yet light carbon bars? and thoughts on KMC 10SL chain? and 1090 cassette?
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  5. #5
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    If it were me, I would list every part you have in a spreadsheet along with their weights(weigh them yourself, search for others that have weighed them or lastly use the mfg weights) and see where you think you would get the biggest bang for the buck. That is depending your budget.

    I did a quick check and see your cassette is definitely a tank, but an xx will run ~$350 to drop 1/2 lb, the 1090 will limit your gear ratio to 28 teeth...something to think about. The chain and Ti bolts would be unnoticeable IMO. Even the bars probably won't drop a ton of weight. Crests will save you a bit less than 1/2lb, but you'd have to either buy new wheels again or have those rebuilt.

    Oh, and bad ass bike!
    Last edited by TBarnaby; 12-02-2011 at 09:32 AM. Reason: speeling keels me

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by rob1208lv View Post
    Currently I have a 2012 Epic Comp Carbon 29er stock except
    XO front rear Derailleurs, XO shifters, X9 bb30 crankset, stans arch wheels ZTR hubs, Thomson masterpiece seat-post, wtb rocket v slt saddle, swabble racing ralph front tire performance forte spd pedals, OSI grips - weight is 25.10lbs. I want it lower. But I don't want to spend a ton of cash. All I can think of is changing the Cassette to (XX), chain,to (?) handlebars to carbon, maybe a lighter stem, maybe some TI bolts in various places?? so my question is?
    1. are there any cost effective tricks for lowering the weight?
    The heavy stuff is the Crankset, the X0 Shifters and the cassette. You can drop 250/300+ grams by switching to Lightning (Specialized), Get XO gripshift, or one of the few other available, and drop about 100 grams. Find an XTR cassette 11x34, or Luckynino 11x32, and you are down to 200-240 grams: you do not need 36 or 34 if you have 3 chainrings.

    Titanium/aluminum bolts will save you 20 grams if you are lucky.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by TBarnaby View Post
    If it were me, I would list every part you have in a spreadsheet along with their weights(weigh them yourself, search for others that have weighed them or lastly use the mfg weights) and see where you think you would get the biggest bang for the buck. That is depending your budget.

    I did a quick check and see your cassette is definitely a tank, but an xx will run ~$350 to drop 1/2 lb, the 1090 will limit your gear ratio to 28 teeth...something to think about. The chain and Ti bolts would be unnoticeable IMO. Even the bars probably won't drop a ton of weight. Crests will save you a bit less than 1/2lb, but you'd have to either buy new wheels again or have those rebuilt.

    Oh, and bad ass bike!
    Thanks!!! and thanks for the tips. I didn't want crest that's why I built arches instead, they came in at 3.1lbs and the specialized wheels i replaced came in at 4.7lbs. I did a hand written spread sheet but only included my current stuff and what each weights. I guess your right about all the TI more of a bling than a weight savings. And that price on the cassette is whats holding me back. Maybe I'll swap rotors to XX since mine have turkey gobble. Really limited. My only thought is to save up and buy a roval carbon wheelset and throw a xx cassette on that and use it for racing, while using what I currently have for training and trail riding..
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Davide View Post
    The heavy stuff is the Crankset, the X0 Shifters and the cassette. You can drop 250/300+ grams by switching to Lightning (Specialized), Get XO gripshift, or one of the few other available, and drop about 100 grams. Find an XTR cassette 11x34, or Luckynino 11x32, and you are down to 200-240 grams: you do not need 36 or 34 if you have 3 chainrings.

    Titanium/aluminum bolts will save you 20 grams if you are lucky.
    the crankset is 2x10, the shifters are matchmaker, and I'm not a fan of gripshift, also I read bad reviews on the luckynino and recon cassette's.. I'm thinking a new crankset is a good idea though. Thanks
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  9. #9
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    Consider 1x10. Front derailleur, shifter, cable, housing and chainring will drop quite a bit of weight.

  10. #10
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    Cranks as mentioned is a good start. Not sure what bars you have but once you get weights on all the parts that are actually on the bike you can then start comparing others against them to see what is going to get you the most bang for the buck. Keep in mind that WWness is a slippery slope my friend.

    You can also drop some weight in your seatpost. The Thompson is a nice part but there are definitely lighter ones out there. I just picked up a 400mm KCNC post for $100 that weight in at "167g". This is to replace my current 350mm KCNC post that weighs in at 142 grams w/ carbon Smud cradle on it. You just have to know what you are working with to start with.

    I have a KMC X9sl chain and I can tell you that it is almost 80g lighter than the stock chain that came with my bike. I ride a SS mind you so my stock chain was pretty beefy.

    Ti/alu bolts should be one of the last things you do unless say you are swapping out a stem then you might as well get the ti bolts for it at the same time. That is what I tried to do along the way anyway.

    There are certainly lighter pedals out there as well. I picked up a set of Crank Brothers 3's and then replaced the spindles with ti ones for $60 off ebay. In the end, I have pedals that are now closer to 215g as opposed to the 285 they started at.

    Your seat is another place you can shave some weight. But you have to be comfortable so alot of folks don't like to play around with this one. My stock seat was well over 200g and my current one is 145g though I also have a 110g carbon one. There are lighter ones out ther as my Smud carbon seat weighed in at 68g.

    Handlebars can shed some weight but not as much as some of the other parts noted above unless your bike has a very heavy dh bar on it.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2002maniac View Post
    Consider 1x10. Front derailleur, shifter, cable, housing and chainring will drop quite a bit of weight.
    Great Idea...
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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1SPD View Post
    Cranks as mentioned is a good start. Not sure what bars you have but once you get weights on all the parts that are actually on the bike you can then start comparing others against them to see what is going to get you the most bang for the buck. Keep in mind that WWness is a slippery slope my friend.

    You can also drop some weight in your seatpost. The Thompson is a nice part but there are definitely lighter ones out there. I just picked up a 400mm KCNC post for $100 that weight in at "167g". This is to replace my current 350mm KCNC post that weighs in at 142 grams w/ carbon Smud cradle on it. You just have to know what you are working with to start with.

    I have a KMC X9sl chain and I can tell you that it is almost 80g lighter than the stock chain that came with my bike. I ride a SS mind you so my stock chain was pretty beefy.

    Ti/alu bolts should be one of the last things you do unless say you are swapping out a stem then you might as well get the ti bolts for it at the same time. That is what I tried to do along the way anyway.

    There are certainly lighter pedals out there as well. I picked up a set of Crank Brothers 3's and then replaced the spindles with ti ones for $60 off ebay. In the end, I have pedals that are now closer to 215g as opposed to the 285 they started at.

    Your seat is another place you can shave some weight. But you have to be comfortable so alot of folks don't like to play around with this one. My stock seat was well over 200g and my current one is 145g though I also have a 110g carbon one. There are lighter ones out ther as my Smud carbon seat weighed in at 68g.

    Handlebars can shed some weight but not as much as some of the other parts noted above unless your bike has a very heavy dh bar on it.
    Some good points thanks much.. , My seat-post is considerably light and strong at 158g, I'm most likely picking up a new chain this weekend, my saddle will not go, besides its only 199g. I ride SPD and I can't find a lighter pedal than the forte's at 295g. Thanks again
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  13. #13
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    Top Tip 1:
    - Get rid of your stem cap AND starnut completely (if that's what you have), replace with U.S.E.'s Ring-Go-Star (and leave out the cap completely, it's just cosmetic) - save 30g for $20. If you find it's not giving you enough preload adjustment, use TWO, stacked - they are almost as light as spacers, and will do double duty as that!

    Top Tip 2:
    - What grips do you have? Get foam ones at 15-ish grams if you haven't already. Cheap, and very grippy.

    Top Tip 3:
    - Nokon Carbon Shift and Brake Housing will save a ton depending on what you had before, although the big saving is mainly for the brake steel cable, and I guess you're on discs. (it also costs a TON) Alternatively, just use the alu version, and there are now lighter (and CHEAPER!) ones on the market than Nokon (Alligator iLink, Swiss-Comp, etc)

    Top Tip 4:
    - Bottle cages: a Tune kevlar+carbon one is not TOO crazy-expensive, and weighs something insane like under 9 grams! (needs a specific Tune bottle though)

    5. Panaracer polyurethane tubes if you're not tubeless - very light!

    6 Forget carbon bars, almost all of them are no lighter than 7075 alu but 3x the price - the very LIGHTEST bars I saw are KCNC's awesome scandium bars. Consider going flat instead of riser (saves 70 grams+), and go back to standard clamp instead of the frankly pointless 31.8 (no stiffer) - saves 50-60 grams.
    The KCNC 25.4 flat bars are under 98 grams if I recall... Beat that, carbon. Also, get the expensive but AMAZINGLY machined and beautiful Extralite stem, ALSO under 98 grams.
    Extralite's V-brake levers are masterpieces, as are the KCNC V-brake arms, but they also COST a couple of arms!

    7. RE Ti bolts: ALU bolts, where they can be used, are much lighter AND cheaper - for anything that's not structurally important: bottle cages, computer + light fittings, even REAR brake frame mounting bolts if you're running V-brakes - front too, if you run them BEHIND the fork... The bolts just need to hold the brakes so they don't fall out of the frame, they should not be under stress. Then the fat bolt inside the rear mech, that saves 4 or 5 grams.

    8. KCNC cobweb chainrings don't cost much more than "normal" rings but are definitely lighter.

    Some slightly more radical ideas:

    Replace your spokes with the awesome CX Ray spokes, and then, since they're so strong, you can also go down a size or two in the spokes: 24 upfront, 28 spokes at the back, or 24 at the back, 16 up front if you're not a heavy rider. (obviously, entails additional hefty expense of new hubs and rims - I recommend Tune for ultimate weight-shedding!)

    Go double chainset if you're on a triple.

    --
    Changes 1 to 8 could save you 250-450 grams and (most) won't break the bank. I make it about $300-360 for points 1-8 if buying NEW, MUCH less if used. ($180-$220)

    The last two could save an additional 300-450 grams.
    Total saving: 900 grams = 2 pounds!

    Super-radical ideas: go singlespeed and save another 1.5 kilos!
    Go rigid carbon MTB forks upfront and save another 800 grams!
    Last edited by Magnifico; 12-03-2011 at 08:55 AM.

  14. #14
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    "Super-radical ideas: go singlespeed and save another 1.5 kilos!
    Go rigid carbon MTB forks upfront and save another 800 grams!"

    Now we are talking!

    That is pretty good for the Thompson stem. What length is it? I just weighed my new KCNC post and it came in at 158g but it is a 400mm.

    You can also used plastic/nylon screws for your water bottle cages if you even use bottle cages. They are about half the weight of aluminum ones.

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    Ok, fairwheel is down!!! I think I am having a panic attack!

    Was looking to see if I could find the KCNC bars mentioned above but all I found was a 31.8 which appears to weigh in at 119g. Anyone got a link for the 25.4 size or whatever they are?

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1SPD View Post
    "Super-radical ideas: go singlespeed and save another 1.5 kilos!
    Go rigid carbon MTB forks upfront and save another 800 grams!"

    Now we are talking!

    That is pretty good for the Thompson stem. What length is it? I just weighed my new KCNC post and it came in at 158g but it is a 400mm.

    You can also used plastic/nylon screws for your water bottle cages if you even use bottle cages. They are about half the weight of aluminum ones.
    I already ride a SS rigid bike, but its steel and weighs 23lbs
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by rob1208lv View Post
    the crankset is 2x10, the shifters are matchmaker, and I'm not a fan of gripshift, also I read bad reviews on the luckynino and recon cassette's.. I'm thinking a new crankset is a good idea though. Thanks
    Well ... you know ... weight is kind of over-rated. I just switched to 1x8 http://forums.mtbr.com/drivetrain-sh....html#poststop and lost about 300 grams, could not really tell the difference (but I love the set up: so clean!). Then my TNT square taper BB gave up the ghost and I had to put a XT on with a gain of 110 grams ( ) ... still no perceptible difference of sort.

    So ... I am not sure it is worth the effort unless your components wear out or you really need to change something.

    In my case I am tempted to go 1x9 (or 1x10) just to have a bit more range for the damn fire roads, and if I do I will get a luckynino 9 speed 11x36 (or XTR 10). For the crank I will get a Lightning in a year of so: my Race Face LP are getting VERY old.
    Last edited by Davide; 12-02-2011 at 07:15 PM.

  18. #18
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    Get the 2012 hs1 rotors, going 1x10 will be the biggest savings for least $.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by GTR2ebike View Post
    Get the 2012 hs1 rotors, going 1x10 will be the biggest savings for least $.
    The HS1 is whats stock on the bike..
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    So far you have spent over $5000 in ideas and your bike is no lighter! Good job.

  21. #21
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    I would just change stem, bars and cassette if I did't want to spent a lot of money. Anyway, I think that the best tactics for a budget-conscious weight weenie is to buy lighter parts when the old parts wear off.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 1SPD View Post
    "Super-radical ideas: go singlespeed and save another 1.5 kilos!
    Go rigid carbon MTB forks upfront and save another 800 grams!"

    Now we are talking!

    That is pretty good for the Thompson stem. What length is it? I just weighed my new KCNC post and it came in at 158g but it is a 400mm.

    You can also used plastic/nylon screws for your water bottle cages if you even use bottle cages. They are about half the weight of aluminum ones.
    Do you mean the Extralite stem I mentioned? Just went to check on the site, it's actually even lighter than I remembered! Under 90 grams for a 100mm and barely 90 for the 110!! Even the looong 120mm is still under 100 grams! (See the sizes + weights below)
    Have a peek at extralite.com - lots of yumminess there!

    They too are also advocates of the standard 25.4 barclamp over the OS, and even have some scientific calculations to back it up - though they DO offer their stem in OS as well - hey, you gots to give the people what they want...

    Stem Lenghts in mm: 90, 100, 110, 120
    Corresponding Weight: 81, 86, 91, 95 grams
    Last edited by Magnifico; 12-03-2011 at 05:59 AM. Reason: -

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by rob1208lv View Post
    Currently I have a 2012 Epic Comp Carbon 29er stock except
    XO front rear Derailleurs, XO shifters, X9 bb30 crankset, stans arch wheels ZTR hubs, Thomson masterpiece seat-post, wtb rocket v slt saddle, swabble racing ralph front tire performance forte spd pedals, OSI grips - weight is 25.10lbs. I want it lower. But I don't want to spend a ton of cash. All I can think of is changing the Cassette to (XX), chain,to (?) handlebars to carbon, maybe a lighter stem, maybe some TI bolts in various places?? so my question is?
    1. are there any cost effective tricks for lowering the weight?
    What? A Specialized Epic Carbon without the Roval carbon wheels? Yup, the Roval carbon 29"er wheels are expensive, but they would be a game changer for you. 1440g or 1530g - depending on which pair you get (Rev/Aero spokes or the Supercomp spokes). The weight savings would be nice for the carbon 29"er wheels, but the performance they provide is even better. Can you tell I like the pair I just bought?

    Xpedo Ti/Ti pedals are 210g a pair and SPD and work great.

    Sure, you could monkey with shaving grams off of grips, bar, stem, saddle, bolts and all of that "non improvement in race time type of stuff", but you'll have to pony up some real cash if you want to cut the most important weight and improve your performance [i.e. = wheels]. Rovals would cut 300g (for the 1440g pair) off or your Arch/ZTR wheels - and they would be stiffer.

    That's where I would look to change your game.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by BubbleGum View Post
    I would just change stem, bars and cassette if I did't want to spent a lot of money. Anyway, I think that the best tactics for a budget-conscious weight weenie is to buy lighter parts when the old parts wear off.
    Sure, OR just take advantage of the fact that the current parts are new now, so should get top dollar on the 'bay now, then use the money made to invest in lighter stuff.

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    The main thing to keep in mind is that when you're thinking about replacing the stuff you have, if that stuff is already reasonably light, any weight saving will cost about $1 per 1 gram, so it can get eye-wateringly expensive (unless you're buying used, when it's just get-your-other-half-annoyed expensive) - although some of the stuff I suggested can work out cheaper and is easier to swap out, but as you saw, it's not big weight savings we're talking about unless you go radical.

    My best (read: best value, most satisfying) weight saving gains come from finding one-off deals over time, like the 8 speed XTR Ti cassettes I got for $60 (NEW!!) in a shop clearance or the USE Alien seatpost (190 grams) I just sniped off the 'bay for $9 (used) or the used WTB saddle with Ti rails I got for practically nothing ($2) from a seller when I bought a cheap frame just because I asked if he happened to have a saddle he was selling cheaply - I later sold the frame for a small profit, but the saddle lives on.

    This is a fairly painful, time-consuming and geeky process, I'd say forget it while you still have your sanity.
    Last edited by Magnifico; 12-04-2011 at 08:41 AM.

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    An awesome way to lighten that cassette is to change to a road one!

    The superb Dura-Ace Ti 12-23 (with a block of cogs on an alloy carrier, so no biting into any hub freewheels) weighs 160 grams!!!! How's that for light?

    All the XC racers and WeightWeenies run road cassettes anyway - MUCH lighter, closer ratio (for the racers) and can run shorter chain AND short cage mech (which for self-respecting WWs, is usually also a Dura-Ace (tuned) - no problem w. any shifts) so you can probably save 250 grams+ in one swoop!

    BTW, are you on 9 or 10 speed?
    Because if you are on 9 speed, I can get a Dura-Ace 9 spd Ti cass for just $156 US.

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    "The superb Dura-Ace Ti 12-23 (with a block of cogs on an alloy carrier, so no biting into any hub freewheels) weighs 160 grams!!!! How's that for light?"
    Crappy. LOL running a 12/23 on a 29er is great for road riding or hanging your bike from a scale, but is completely useless for any real MTBing.For an 8 grams weight gain go for the
    XG-999 11/32 @ 168 grams.But even this may not give you a low enough gear.

    "All the XC racers and WeightWeenies run road cassettes anyway - MUCH lighter"
    You must do all your riding at the Bonnyville Salt Flats I don't know of any XC racers/riders running road cassette's in my area. When you start your ride with a 2 hour climb in the Rockies, road cassettes will turn most riders into dog meat very quickly.
    I'm riding a 18.45 lbs. FS XC race bike & would never consider gearing higher than 11/32 cog set.

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by xc71 View Post
    "The superb Dura-Ace Ti 12-23 (with a block of cogs on an alloy carrier, so no biting into any hub freewheels) weighs 160 grams!!!! How's that for light?"
    Crappy. LOL running a 12/23 on a 29er is great for road riding or hanging your bike from a scale, but is completely useless for any real MTBing.For an 8 grams weight gain go for the
    XG-999 11/32 @ 168 grams.But even this may not give you a low enough gear.

    "All the XC racers and WeightWeenies run road cassettes anyway - MUCH lighter"
    You must do all your riding at the Bonnyville Salt Flats I don't know of any XC racers/riders running road cassette's in my area. When you start your ride with a 2 hour climb in the Rockies, road cassettes will turn most riders into dog meat very quickly.
    I'm riding a 18.45 lbs. FS XC race bike & would never consider gearing higher than 11/32 cog set.
    Well, sure, it does obviously depend on the terrain. And if the OP is changing to 1 ring upfront, a road cassette won't be an option.

    That XG-999 is very light for what it is - but then it is twice the price.
    TBH, I haven't been keeping up with 10 speed stuff at all. I'm still 8 speed.

    18.45 lbs for your steed is very impressive. What bike and spec?
    Last edited by Magnifico; 12-04-2011 at 12:32 PM.

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Magnifico View Post
    Well, sure, it does obviously depend on the terrain. And if the OP is changing to 1 ring upfront, a road cassette won't be an option.

    That XG-999 is very light for what it is - but then it is twice the price.
    TBH, I haven't been keeping up with 10 speed stuff at all. I'm still 8 speed.

    18.45 lbs for your steed is very impressive. What bike and spec?
    Thanks

    Scott Spark RC.
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  30. #30
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    Im at 23.9lbs

    Yeti ASR5c x0 build, 140 float.

    I went tubeless with Rocket Rons 2.1 (575g each). XC90 flat bars 110g and $39 on price point. Crank brother foam grips 68g and $20.

    I just ordered the KMC x10sl and XX cassette, to replace my 1050 / 1051 cassette. Should be around 23.5 after those too...

    Check your skewers, I got the kcnc skewers and they are much lighter.
    www.garabaghi.com
    more photos
    www.tripxamerica.com
    Reviews by riders.

    Hifi => Ex 9. Thank you warranty.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by xc71 View Post
    Thanks

    Scott Spark RC.
    Mmm, nice - I see lots of the good German stuff - Tune, Schmolke...

    What's the deal with the seatpost - is that all part of the frame apart from some small sort of external seat tube extension or how? (You can tell I haven't been keeping up with the latest developments)
    I've not seen anything like this before except on custom-made one-off time-trial track type bikes which are of course even more extreme with the "post" not being adjustable for height at all.

    And what's the weight of the frame alone?

  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Magnifico View Post
    Mmm, nice - I see lots of the good German stuff - Tune, Schmolke...

    What's the deal with the seatpost - is that all part of the frame apart from some small sort of external seat tube extension or how? (You can tell I haven't been keeping up with the latest developments)
    I've not seen anything like this before except on custom-made one-off time-trial track type bikes which are of course even more extreme with the "post" not being extendable at all but just one piece with the frame.

    And what's the weight of the frame alone?
    No seat post, its part of the frame with the seat topper mounted on the end. You do have a little bit of adjustment up & down with the topper, but when you cut the seat mast you definetly want to measure twice before cutting
    The frame is 3.95 lbs.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by xc71 View Post
    but when you cut the seat mast you definetly want to measure twice before cutting
    Yep, that was exactly what I was thinking.

    So is this a standard that more and more race bikes are using (since I see Tune make an extension/topper/clamp/whatever-it's-called for it) or is it still very rare? When did this newfangled standard (or implementation, if it's not a widespread standard) come on the market?

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Magnifico View Post
    Yep, that was exactly what I was thinking.

    So is this a standard that more and more race bikes are using (since I see Tune make an extension/topper/clamp/whatever-it's-called for it) or is it still very rare? When did this newfangled standard (or implementation, if it's not a widespread standard) come on the market?
    This has been around for awhile & its rare. In fact Scott has dropped it on their 2012 Spark
    & Scale RC's. You'll find it on the odd carbon HT, but not something thats going to be common.

  35. #35
    The Hutch
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    Thanks for all the replys
    I'm going to get a new chain 10sl and save for the roval wheels.
    I'm happy with 25lbs for now.
    follow me
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