DT Swiss X313 Carbon shock - saves 273grams over Brain shock- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    DT Swiss X313 Carbon shock - saves 273grams over Brain shock

    Copied from my G+ page:


    The DT Swiss X313 carbon fibre shock . THis thing is astonishingly light . Now before i get into details I have to mention that I am still getting the German A shock when it comes out in March but it won't be going on this bike simply because it has no adjustability (except air pressure) . i will go into more detail when I get the shock .

    Anyway first of all I removed the decals from the shock to expose the beautiful carbon (possibly saves about 1 gram too) . I then used glue remover the remove the residue and then carbon polish .

    i then removed the valve core and fitted the REset Racing (Germany) valve adjuster . Now this is a 9 gram penalty but totally worth it . Also looks great IMO !!!


    I decided to make my own spacers . When the DT Swiss ones arrive I will keep them as spares . I used 4 short anodised chainring nuts and finely grinded the threads away using a drill bit on high speed in the rotary tool and then sanded the edges smooth . Burnt my thumb but that's dedication for you !!! I then used a large and small socket to press the nuts in (ahheeem) !!!

    I used 4 anodised blue chainring bolts spacers to get the correct diameter and then fitted the shock .

    Now you'll notice this is a short travel shock . It sinks me more into the frame and I get better control and response from the bike .

    I had to do a bit of re-routing of the cable/hose and adjust the saddle and brake levers again but all is good .

    Now i do love the Brain shock don't get me wrong and I will miss it's faultless performance but have you guys checked the weight saving ?!!!

    278grams weight saving for the rear shock . Wahooooooo !!!

    i think the shock looks superb amongst the rest of the carbon parts and the black stanchion looks ace .

    Also note the titanium bolt I hollowed out, rounded off and lightened up and tapped in a standard thread into the shock link for the bolt .

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails DT Swiss X313 Carbon shock - saves 273grams over Brain shock-dscn9849%5B1%5D.jpg  

    DT Swiss X313 Carbon shock - saves 273grams over Brain shock-dscn9848%5B1%5D.jpg  

    DT Swiss X313 Carbon shock - saves 273grams over Brain shock-dscn9822%5B1%5D.jpg  

    DT Swiss X313 Carbon shock - saves 273grams over Brain shock-dscn9829%5B1%5D.jpg  

    DT Swiss X313 Carbon shock - saves 273grams over Brain shock-dscn9830%5B1%5D.jpg  

    DT Swiss X313 Carbon shock - saves 273grams over Brain shock-dscn9831%5B1%5D.jpg  

    DT Swiss X313 Carbon shock - saves 273grams over Brain shock-dscn9828%5B1%5D.jpg  

    DT Swiss X313 Carbon shock - saves 273grams over Brain shock-dscn9835%5B1%5D.jpg  


  2. #2
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    Nice one! What's next?😊
    "you must do what you feel is right of course"

  3. #3
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    Cheers . Have no idea . The whole bike has been modified to death . I have the bike down to nearly 7kg and that's for a large alloy frame, full sus, 160 rotors and bottlecage . Possibly the lightest in the world in its category I hope

  4. #4
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    I love these lightweight shocks, but they can't handle lateral loads very well, so they need to have the special DT Swiss swivelling mounts, can't tell from your pictures if you have incorporated them into your design?

    There have been complaints that these shocks wear out on their sides very quickly, but it always seems to be when someone has put them on a frame using rigid mounts.

    The swivelling mounts allow frame flexibility to move the base out of line with the top, but keep the shock dead straight on its mounts, so it doesn't get the lateral loads that would wear them out.

  5. #5
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    Yep the shock has them . My custom spacers had to be pressed in with the vice so they are nice and tight in there . I have some official DT Swiss ones arriving soon but mine are much lighter

    I have read in other forums of the coating coming off the stanchion too soon which concerns me so I'm hoping that just affected the other model and not this one !!!

  6. #6
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    The coating comes off the stanchion when the shock is fitted with normal rigid mounts, causing the shock to take lateral loads that force the stanchion against the side of the bushes.

    With swivelling mounts it shouldn't be a problem

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by karimian5 View Post
    Cheers . Have no idea . The whole bike has been modified to death . I have the bike down to nearly 7kg and that's for a large alloy frame, full sus, 160 rotors and bottlecage . Possibly the lightest in the world in its category I hope

    Is there a carbon version of your frame that you could just swap over?
    "you must do what you feel is right of course"

  8. #8
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    There is but I don't actually like carbon frames .Simply because ina crash you will most likely destroy the frame . There are videos out there that show people hammering carbon frames to show their strength but they don't take into account the rider's body weight which puts extra pressure on the frame and impacts much harder on an object in the event of a crash . If a carbon component breaks it's far cheaper and easier to replace . Also the weight difference is 300grams which from the overall weight of the bike to me isn't worth buying a new frame .

  9. #9
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    I agree with you totally!
    "you must do what you feel is right of course"

  10. #10
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    I find its generally better to avoid crashing. All the components, and the rider, last longer that way

  11. #11
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    That's helpful!
    "you must do what you feel is right of course"

  12. #12
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    I've been riding carbon framed MTBs for 10+ years now and have crashed many many times . The only part I have ever broken was a chainstay on my Yeti ASR Carbon, and that was due to a badly landed jump/drop off. It seems that this was a design flaw though, as it was replaced by Yeti for free and they allegedly replaced many many of them.

    And I've had the predecessor of this shock (XR Carbon) on a couple of bikes now. I have not experienced any of the coating coming off. I have one currently on my 19lb Yeti ASR5 Carbon. I however would like to send it in to Push to see if they can improve the damping. I suspect it's not the most advanced shock out there in that regard.

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    Quote Originally Posted by karimian5 View Post
    There is but I don't actually like carbon frames .Simply because ina crash you will most likely destroy the frame
    Carbon frames are much tougher than you'd imagine. They can be compromised if gouged with a very sharp rock, but most impacts just bounce off. And Carbon can be repaired. Avoiding all the benefits of a lightweight carbon frame just because you expect to do some severe crashes is a very negative way to approach bike riding. Look back over the last few years, how many times have you crashed so severely that you would have broken a tough carbon frame?

    Quote Originally Posted by karimian5 View Post
    Also the weight difference is 300grams .
    I find this very hard to believe, have you actually stripped down your frame and weighed it? When I took the trouble to do that on my bike, I was shocked at how heavy it was. The manufacturer figures are often very optimistic, and are usually based on the smallest frame they make. Moving to a carbon frame saved me around 800g, and I'd tuned the alu frame to trim almost 100g from it, so moving to carbon from a standard alu frame would be a 900g saving.

  14. #14
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    I must admit karimian5, that I find your reluctance to use a carbon frame very interesting. You've applied/used carbon in many innovative ways, and in ways you'd never expect. By contrast, carbon frames are commonplace nowadays, and you have nothing to fear.

    Besides, given your apparent budget, if something flukey (word?) were to occur, you can obtain a new frame anyway.

  15. #15
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    Very true . In fact prior to buying the frame there was a sale on and the carbon Sworks was being sold for around 100.00 cheaper than this one . The only downside was that it was a small . Now imagine if I had bought that frame . The bike would be well below the 8kg mark - but un rideable for me . I would have also saved 100.00 . I just love alloy frames more . I mean as you know the M5 alloy is far lighter than most alloy frames . Also the weight difference being 250/300grams would still keep the bike at the 8kg mark .

    You're right though i do sound odd not wanting a carbon frame but put it this way - that's more of a WW challenge !!!

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    There is an odd thing about changing a frame, in theory its just another component, and swapping a crankset wouldn't feel like you just changed your bike, but from an emotional perspective, swapping a frame definitely feels like you have a different bike.

    So, it might just be that emotional pull of your current frame that is keeping you on Alu. Many people still feel that about steel frames, but to be a weight weenie and deliberately sabotage your overall weight doesn't work for me; whatever you do with your bike, it can't possibly get down to the weight of the lightest carbon framed bikes

    So the answer to your other thread is that 8.3kg is about as good as it gets for an alu framed mtb, unless you swap all your components across to road bike ones, and then have a lighter bike that looks like a heavy MTB. Sorry, but I can't get that logic to make any sense to me, perhaps I should step out of this discussion at this point

  17. #17
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    Sorry for changing the topic of your op!
    "you must do what you feel is right of course"

  18. #18
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    I see your point . I guess it makes it more of a challenge to get an alloy bike to get close to a carbon one . Anyone can make a light bike with a carbon frame as it's the most crucial part of the bike . You see light carbon MTBs/road bikes here there and everywhere so it becomes the norm which is not what I want . If and only if I can get this bike to a similar weight to a carbon one then that is possibly the greatest achievement made and opens people's eyes that it can be done with an alloy frame .

    BTW with some more lighter parts and changing my tyres and tubes (and realising I messed up on the scales) the weight has dropped to 8.1kg . I still have a bit more to do .

  19. #19
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    Hi karimian5, I know your the boss when talking about tuning things...so I thought I'd ask you this;

    I'm considering a purchase of a used DT Swiss XR carbon shock but is the remote version, the old design remote type with a Aluminum disc, quite big....but I don't need the remote and I was wondering if I could just remove the parts associated with the Remote assembly and used the shock on only one setting? I set my current shock on a trail setting and never change anyways.

    Do you think I could do that?

  20. #20
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    I don't know for the old XR version but my X313 remote is spring loaded at the shock so if you don't use the remote it goes back to full open automatically. But I'm sure you can come up with a way to fix it in platform mode without the remote.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by lRaphl View Post
    I don't know for the old XR version but my X313 remote is spring loaded at the shock so if you don't use the remote it goes back to full open automatically. But I'm sure you can come up with a way to fix it in platform mode without the remote.
    Ok cool...good to know.


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  22. #22
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    Ditch the remote and use a short piece of shifter inner cable (like 35mm long) in the shock's cable stop to permanently set the control actuator at the appropriate position. Using the remote lever, mark the position of the actuator on the shock and replicate that position with the piece of shifter cable when the set screw is tightened.
    I'm a member of NSMBA and IMBA Canada

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by karimian5 View Post
    There is but I don't actually like carbon frames .Simply because ina crash you will most likely destroy the frame . There are videos out there that show people hammering carbon frames to show their strength but they don't take into account the rider's body weight which puts extra pressure on the frame and impacts much harder on an object in the event of a crash . If a carbon component breaks it's far cheaper and easier to replace . Also the weight difference is 300grams which from the overall weight of the bike to me isn't worth buying a new frame .
    I also find it a bit of a misplaced effort to go through all this nice work to save weight on the shock but avoid a carbon frame.

    The DT shock saves that amount of weight only when compared with the Specialized shock. Compare it instead to a Fox Float or RS: they come in at around the 200 grams mark ...

    Carbon frame? I just bought a Norco Revolver 27.5. It was "cheap" at $1700 and the claimed weight (probably without shock) is 1800 grams for a medium. We'll see when I get it, but the point is that you cannot find a full suspension aluminum bike in the sub 5 pounds range, but there are plenty in carbon (YETI, Scott, Norco are all solidly sub 4.5). Best I have seen in aluminum is 5.5-6.0 but most are close to the 7 pound mark!!!!! So at worst you are gaining more than two pounds by going aluminum, at best maybe one and change ...

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by rockyuphill View Post
    Ditch the remote and use a short piece of shifter inner cable (like 35mm long) in the shock's cable stop to permanently set the control actuator at the appropriate position. Using the remote lever, mark the position of the actuator on the shock and replicate that position with the piece of shifter cable when the set screw is tightened.

    Sorry for posting a picture here OP. Here is the detail of the remote assembly:
    DT Swiss X313 Carbon shock - saves 273grams over Brain shock-s-l1600.jpeg

    I'm a little confused by your explanation, the shock doesn't come with the remote lever.

    What I would like to do (or know) is if I can remove all the components from the remote feature, like this big alloy 'pulley' disc, the cable stopper, possibly the center bolt....and still have a functional shock. Perhaps I could remove all of that and adapt some kind of small lever instead of the center bolt so it would still give me adjustability to lock or unlock the shock? you said its spring actuated?

    Your cable explanation does make sense to me...but that would be keeping the Alloy disc correct? you mean...cutting a small 35mm long cable, keep the cable end flushing with the cable stopper and screwing the end on the pulley?

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