Rain riding gear?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 21 of 21
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    535

    Rain riding gear?

    I dont mind riding in the rain, yesterday was like a water sport , and I enjoyed it a lot anyways.
    Plan to ride all winter.

    Gear wise ,have a good jacket but looking for waterproof socks , and shorts.
    Any recommendations?

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Junersun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2014
    Posts
    1,856
    Five ten element shoes? Socks I just stick with wool.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Current Bikes

    2015 Transition Patrol AL
    2016 YT Tues AL

  3. #3
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    18,453
    I got some Gore Tex liner socks a couple years ago. They're much cheaper than another pair of cycling shoes and work great.

    I also have Gore Tex knickers. The fit's a little funny but they do keep me dry.

    If you're on a hardtail and don't use a dropper post, I highly recommend a rear fender. (I should reinstall mine!)

    Sent from my E5803 using Tapatalk
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    379

    Rain riding gear?

    Riding in the rain is awesome -provided you're on trails that won't get damaged. Most of the trails drain pretty well around here now. If you want to ride all year, you've gotta get used to it anyway, so might as well enjoy it. Feels great to be out riding knowing many others are on the couch too

    While I did wear a rain jacket yesterday, it's funny that during the wet season, the ultralight rain jacket still stays in my pack most of the time. I find it too hot most of the time and don't need it for anything but a big downpour. A light flannel or mid layer seems to work fine most of the time since the tree canopy covers most of our trails so well.

    The FiveTen Element shoes are great, but so are waterproof socks. I like Sealskinz and the ones from Showers Pass. Two downsides: they aren't breathable, so your feet sweat, and they are more bulky, so you need to wear a looser fitting shoe or you may get possible toe numbness. Most of the time, I just wear merino wool socks.

    Waterproof shorts like the Endura MT 500 or the Raceface Agent work great.

    A plastic front fender like MuckyNutz or Marsh is indispensable. I leave it on all year. MuckyNutz makes a rear fender of same type that straps onto the seat post and can be used with a dropper. When I remember to bring it, it works well.

    My favorite new piece of rain gear is Gore Bike Wear Equipe rain cap to wear under the helmet. Offers just a little warmth, and the small bill keeps the rain off my face.

    Other than that, just ride and ignore the rain.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    535
    Thanks just ordered Endura MT 500 shorts.
    And yes feels great to be out riding knowing many others are on the couch.

  6. #6
    eri
    eri is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: eri's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    690
    I used rei lightweight running gators on my shoes. Feet stay much warmer and drier. Were $15. Also keeps out dirt and snow.

    Still trying to figure out a shell, my lightweight shell is too hot and not breathable enough. Thinking there must be some new miracle fabric. For now I wear a wool sweater and get soaked.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Crankyone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    450
    Quote Originally Posted by eri View Post
    I used rei lightweight running gators on my shoes. Feet stay much warmer and drier. Were $15. Also keeps out dirt and snow.

    Still trying to figure out a shell, my lightweight shell is too hot and not breathable enough. Thinking there must be some new miracle fabric. For now I wear a wool sweater and get soaked.
    The gators are a fantastic idea, but nevertheless, you are going to get wet from your scalp to your toes. Buy a $100k motorhome with a hot shower, or, Have dry stuff in the car! Don't forget the towels and the garbage bags for your wet stuff.

  8. #8
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    18,453
    Quote Originally Posted by eri View Post
    I used rei lightweight running gators on my shoes. Feet stay much warmer and drier. Were $15. Also keeps out dirt and snow.

    Still trying to figure out a shell, my lightweight shell is too hot and not breathable enough. Thinking there must be some new miracle fabric. For now I wear a wool sweater and get soaked.
    I have a Castelli rain jersey. It's awesome. It's basically a softshell. It's breathable enough that I only get a little slimy inside rather than it being like a jungle and it's waterproof enough that I only get a little damp in sustained rain rather than getting waterlogged.

    I realize that doesn't sound like high praise, but I also have a pretty nice shell and I totally sweat more than it breathes riding athletically. Since my summerweight jerseys get damp when I ride hard on a typical summer day, I don't expect my rain jersey to be magically better than that. But it's definitely a lot better than either a hard shell or a long sleeved jersey that doesn't shed water.

    Sent from my E5803 using Tapatalk
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    230
    Since I ride flats, most of the available shoes are like sponges. I have some gore Tex waterproof socks that I wear over light wool socks that are amazing. The setup actually breathes so well that I can just keep my wool socks on after a completely drenched ride.
    Tried some raceface waterproof shorts this year and they don't work as well as I'd hoped from some glowing reviews. Fit is small, and I still wound up wet in a total soaker, but maybe I'm expecting too much from them.

  10. #10
    eri
    eri is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation: eri's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    690
    Quote Originally Posted by AndrwSwitch View Post
    I have a Castelli rain jersey. It's awesome. It's basically a softshell. It's breathable enough that I only get a little slimy inside rather than it being like a jungle and it's waterproof enough that I only get a little damp in sustained rain rather than getting waterlogged.
    Sounds perfect. Is that the gabba2?

    Other problem with lightweight shells is they're shredded if you crash.

  11. #11
    Justin Vander Pol
    Reputation: juice's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    1,665
    Don't try to stay dry, try to stay comfortable.

    Ditch the waterproof jacket and wear a layer or two of lightweight shirts with merino wool next to your skin. Second layer can be poly or merino. You won't feel wet, and you won't get cold when it's wet. But always always always wear merino next to the skin.

    If it's really cold I wear a super breathable windbreaker vest. Not at all waterproof, but cuts the wind a keeps you warm if it's really windy out. Packs up tiny too, since even this is usually too hot for big climbs once you're warmed up.

    Same for socks - just accept wet feet but wear a slightly heavier wool sock. I like the DeFeet Wooly Booly - last forever and comforable without being too thick. Some people like waterproof socks, but for me I just sweat them out immediately and then I'm wet anyway.

    Bring two pairs of gloves on wet rides, and change into the dry pair half way through or for the descent.

    Even though five.tens are sponges, I like them better than my more water resistance Shimano SPD setup in bad weather. Now I only run flats on the fall/winter and save the clipless for huge summer sufferfest rides.

    Shorts: Endura MT500 are pretty good. A bit wateproof in the butt-stripe, and a bit breathable. Shorts are the only place where I think Goretex actually works.

    Underwear: Chamois = sponge = wet diaper = misery. Someone needs to invent better bike underwear...

    I've been doing winter rides for a long time, and have it totally dialed to where I'm almost always comfortable.

    As for fenders, rear fenders just don't work unless you're riding mellower trails on a hardtail. Even then, it'll probably break and fall off. But a mini-front fender of the kind that straps to your fork arch (like the Mucky Nutz face fender) is surprisingly effective at keeping your face clean, and you'll forget it's even on there.

    And know where to ride. If it's raining just a bit I'll ride most of our trails that can handle the abuse. There's more of them these days (yay Evergreen and DNR and King Co!). If it's been raining a lot and I must ride, then it's Tokul East. It also rains twice as hard at Tiger as either of the Tokuls, so get to know your micro climates.

    The rain is actually less a problem than water on a trail - that's how you get soaked to the bone.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,635
    My uber wet riding kit involves thick wool socks & US army goretex gen III/level 6 pants (cheap on ebay in summer & better than the originals). The pants aren't insulated, and are very light weight. When i get done riding I strip off the pants and I'm clean and dry. Gloves I use camelback cold weather gloves. They won't keep you dry, but warm enough, last forever with a bit of care and aren't too bulky.

    Like others said a goretex jacket may be a bit overkill, it'll keep you dry from the rain but you'll sweat and get anyway.

    But if it's a mid winter wet ride I'll still sport goretex tops and bottoms just in case a mechanical leaves me out longer than intended.
    Last edited by eshew; 11-08-2016 at 02:41 PM.

  13. #13
    Fat-tired Roadie
    Reputation: AndrwSwitch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    18,453
    Quote Originally Posted by eri View Post
    Sounds perfect. Is that the gabba2?
    Not exactly. It's a team jersey. The sleeves don't come off and I believe they had to compromise performance a little for it to take graphics.

    Sent from my E5803 using Tapatalk
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Legbacon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,564
    5 minutes on google will find this. https://www.themudhugger.eu/?geoip=skip
    A real mountain bike mudguard that I have been using on Vancouver Island for 2 years. It changed winter riding for me completely. This WILL keep your ass pretty dry if it's not raining and you are riding through water and muck. I will finish a ride and the only spot on my body that is clean will be my ass. It also keeps the dropper cleaner which is a big +. My friends all have them and they are becoming more popular out here. I have 2 pair of shoes so I can always get a pair dried out in time 2 ride. I save my rain jacket for the 2nd 1/2 of the ride, the mostly down part and will sometimes bring a dry shirt as well. 2nd pair of gloves is just the ticket sometimes. I have the RF shorts but I don't need them very often with the Mudhugger.
    Formerly Travis Bickle

    Team Robot. "modulation is code for I suck at brake control. Heres a free tip: get better."

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: OldHouseMan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    4,336
    If you ride with clipless shoes and pedals, check out the Lake MX145 winter shoe. They're not insulated but are water resistance.

  16. #16
    NWS
    NWS is offline
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Posts
    1,468
    Quote Originally Posted by Crankyone View Post
    Don't forget the towels and the garbage bags for your wet stuff.
    Wife: How did you get the car so muddy?

    Me: First, I coat myself with mud...

  17. #17
    Ride More - Suffer Less
    Reputation: TraxFactory's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 1999
    Posts
    2,296
    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Bickle View Post
    5 minutes on google will find this. https://www.themudhugger.eu/?geoip=skip
    Hey nice find! I like how that thing connects. I am thinking of how I can make it work on a asymmetrical design. Maybe just cut into one side for the proper angle and re-flange it with heat gun?

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Legbacon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,564
    Quote Originally Posted by TraxFactory View Post
    Hey nice find! I like how that thing connects. I am thinking of how I can make it work on a asymmetrical design. Maybe just cut into one side for the proper angle and re-flange it with heat gun?
    That might work. Can you just attach one side to the outside of the seat stay. Pretty pricy if it doesn't fit.
    Formerly Travis Bickle

    Team Robot. "modulation is code for I suck at brake control. Heres a free tip: get better."

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    79
    Trying to keep the rain out and keep dry on the trail generally just leads to misery for me. Embracing the rain and accepting that I am going to get soaked to the bone I choose clothing that will hold the least amount of water possible. I use 2 poly shirts with my chest protector between them. This gives me a suitable amount of insulation with minimal water retention.

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    282
    Have biked and skied for a long time, and have tried "rain" gear plenty of times. It staves off the wetness for a bit of time, but on a typical ride or ski day (2+ hours), an extra 10 or 20 minutes of dryness is irrelevant, all for the hassle and cost of rain gear.

    I use layered wool, good booties, good gloves, balaclava and fenders. Will get totally soaked of course but will stay warm typically. I was out last night in the pouring rain and muck in the low 40s and was fine for the ~90 minute ride and had a blast.

    All in all though, I try not to ride in the rain. I'm usually able to get out 1-2 times a week in fairly dry conditions during the rainy months.

  21. #21
    Wierdo
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    3,019
    Some good advice in this thread.

    I also subscribe to the thought of layering with wool. For me keeping my hands and feet warm are the most important - like Juice I will bring a couple pairs of gloves to change out during the ride and for my feet I invested in a pair of Lake Winter riding boots...a really good investment. Otherwise I layer in wool and just accept the fact that I'll be getting wet.

Similar Threads

  1. Rain riding gear or trainer?
    By zorg in forum California - Norcal
    Replies: 63
    Last Post: 01-19-2016, 02:11 PM
  2. rain riding gear?
    By TrailNut in forum Riding Passion
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 02-15-2014, 07:46 PM
  3. Input on rain jacket or rain gear in general
    By hidperf in forum Bikepacking and Bike Expedition
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 08-14-2013, 07:29 PM
  4. Replies: 15
    Last Post: 11-02-2012, 06:33 AM
  5. rain gear
    By fishercat in forum Commuting
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 10-07-2011, 04:56 PM

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.