Do you need a DH bike for Stevens Pass Bike Park?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Do you need a DH bike for Stevens Pass Bike Park?

    Title pretty much sums it up.. I'm looking to ride up there this summer and wondering what type of bike would be the best for the terrain up there. I have a 2014 Specialized Enduro and was wondering if that would cut it up there.

  2. #2
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    No sir! I have more fun at Stevens on my Stumpjumper Evo than I did on a DH bike. Your Enduro will be just fine. Slingshot Wookie is the most advanced trail and while you have to be a little more careful with your lines, it is easily doable on a 6" bike.

    All the other trails are more suited for 5-6" bikes and a full on DH bike is overkill. There is a decent amount of pedaling if you want to keep your speed up on the lower half of rockcrusher.
    20 SJ Evo 29, 17 Whyte T130, 18 Giant Glory Advanced

  3. #3
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    I've ridden Stevens a fair amount on my Pivot Mach 6. It's fine/great. The difference with a DH bike is that a DH bike is far better at erasing brake bumps / chatter, and you won't get tired as quickly as on a 6" bike. I run my Mach 6 suspension softer when riding Stevens compared to Duthie to favor suppleness/chatter-reduction compared to absorbing Duthie's larger hits on smooth trails.

  4. #4
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    The only change I make to my bike is I run a set of burly aluminum wheels with DH tires. There are lots of rocks and the potential for flats.
    20 SJ Evo 29, 17 Whyte T130, 18 Giant Glory Advanced

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Lynch View Post
    The only change I make to my bike is I run a set of burly aluminum wheels with DH tires. There are lots of rocks and the potential for flats.
    good to know. my bike has carbon rims that im running tubless right now. maybe i should invest in another set of wheels?

  6. #6
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    While you don't need a DH bike at Stevens to have a good time. You may very well find that you'll beat the crap out of your bike and break more items on your trail bike, especially if riding harder to get more out of the trails. For me, after three times at Stevens, I blew up a brake caliper (which makes Wookie interesting at speed), destroyed an RP23, and went through two rear deraileurs. Eventually this all adds up in cost and lost time on the trail bike elsewhere. Suggest renting a DH bike up there for half a day or day and seeing the difference for yourself. But as others have said, you don't need a DH bike to have fun up there, but it does make a difference for some aspects.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by DUCNCOVER View Post
    good to know. my bike has carbon rims that im running tubless right now. maybe i should invest in another set of wheels?
    I too run carbon tubeless wheels but I leave them at home for stevens!
    One of my riding buddies did the same thing but he also got a cheap longer travel fork to beat on too. It was cheaper than a whole new bike.

    Like Nick said DH is riding is really hard on your bike, and several times at Stevens we have done 20+ runs. If you go often it does make sense to have a dedicate DH sled to beat on.
    20 SJ Evo 29, 17 Whyte T130, 18 Giant Glory Advanced

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    I agree that Stevens is hard on trail bike equipment. Stevens days definitely accelerated my time-to-fork-rebuild last summer. You don't normally get 15K - 20K feet of descending in a day trail riding

    The fork rebuild was cheaper than owning a DH bike. Overall, I'm relatively happy riding my M6 at Stevens, but I'd be lying if I said I weren't considering owning/renting a DH bike for it.

  9. #9
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    Tell me a little more about this stevens pass bike park. Do they rent bikes, all I have is a rigid jones. How about gear? This sounds like something that I would very much like to try out.
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  10. #10
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    Yes, they rent DH bikes, full face helmets, knee/shin guards, and elbow guards.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fireswamp View Post
    Yes, they rent DH bikes, full face helmets, knee/shin guards, and elbow guards.
    Thanks! I know what I'm going to do this summer!
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    Thanks for all the comments. Im a little less worried about riding my enduro up there now. I didnt really think about the abuse that would be placed on the bikes since the majority of the riding that day is all down hill where as tiger is alot of up hill for a little down hill. I was thinking I would always have to rent a bike up there to enjoy the mountain, now im even more stoked for summer!!

  13. #13
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    If you only plan on riding up there once or twice your bike will work well. If you're gonna ride there much more than that I'd think about buying a DH bike.

    If you end up taking your bike to Stevens I've got a few recommendations that'll make the experience more enjoyable and save your bike from damage.
    - Depending on current settings, you'll probably need to add more psi or high speed compression to your fork and shock.
    - A set of dual ply DH tires such as Maxxis Minion DHF's or Schwalbe Magic Mary's will provide a lot more traction than your stock tires and possibly prevent damage to your wheels.







    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  14. #14
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    I put on Maxxis DHF/DHR on my 6" bike last summer to ride Stevens, and I still haven't taken them off... I'm lazy and they work really well around here anyways.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by nickn View Post
    While you don't need a DH bike at Stevens to have a good time. You may very well find that you'll beat the crap out of your bike and break more items on your trail bike, especially if riding harder to get more out of the trails. For me, after three times at Stevens, I blew up a brake caliper (which makes Wookie interesting at speed), destroyed an RP23, and went through two rear deraileurs. Eventually this all adds up in cost and lost time on the trail bike elsewhere. Suggest renting a DH bike up there for half a day or day and seeing the difference for yourself. But as others have said, you don't need a DH bike to have fun up there, but it does make a difference for some aspects.
    Bringing up an old thread.....

    I'd like to try Stevens Pass maybe a few times this summer but had a question about the above poster's comments on wearing out bike parts. I can see premature wear on shocks due to overheating but how to derailleurs and brake calipers break? Are these crash related?

    Also, Off The Grid at Tiger is rated a black run. Predator is rated double black if I'm remembering that correctly. Could I assume Wookie would be similar to OTG or Predator? Maybe in between?

  16. #16
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    Predator is WAY steeper in spots than anything on Slingshot Wookie. Slingshot has way more rocks though. Id say slingshot is slightly steeper than OTG, but its pretty rough and technical, similar to the toughest spots on Predator.

    Slingshot is pretty rough on a 6" bike, but the rest of the trails are no harder on a bike than a day at tiger. Maybe more wear on brake pads if you do a ton of laps, but a full run at Stevens is 6-8 minutes or so, where as OTG can be 12-20 minutes.
    20 SJ Evo 29, 17 Whyte T130, 18 Giant Glory Advanced

  17. #17
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    Ah. Ok. Thanks.

    I have a 5" Yeti SB95 but it handles everything at Tiger well (minus Predator but I'm probably going to stay on the green and blue runs at Stevens).

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