Preferred tube/tubeless technology for our local geography?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Preferred tube/tubeless technology for our local geography?

    I'm new to mountain biking and am trying to decide what to do about tubes. I currently have a UST setup but would like to get into XC racing & therefore go lighter. I've been thinking about stan's, but from what I've read the biggest benefit they offer is to prevent flats from thorns.

    Are thorns a big problem in our region?

    How does stan's compare to traditional tubes on the more rocky/rooty technical terrain in our region?


  2. #2
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    -I personally like stans, but it can be kind of finicky. You basically eliminate pinch flats by getting rid of the tubes and you can get away with much lower pressures. The finicky part is this: 1) mounting on non-ust rims can be a pain, the bigger the rim, the biger the pain.
    and 2) after a while the Stans in your tire starts to dry up and loses its ability to keep the tire seated. This can be avoided by pouring in new liquid every 10-15 rides.
    -You basically have to cut the tire to flat w/stans, I don't think the stuff really seals up holes but it's cool b/c you can go tubeless with almost any rim/ tire combo. My 2 cents.

  3. #3
    Weiner Dog Connoiseur
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    I run the Panaracer Fire XC Pros in tubeless. I like them and have the Stan's sealant inside. I would say that thorns are a pretty common problem around here, particularly where trails go through more meadow-like terrain. We have a number of invasive plant species that abound in that environment...and many have thorns.

    The Panaracers and the Hutchinson Pythons are good all-around tires for the kind of riding we do around here. There are many tires which do certain things better (mud shedding, more grip, etc.) than these two, but for a tire that can do a decent job accomodating the various conditions that mid-Atlantic riding presents, either one is a good way to go.

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