Let's keep up that sharing-the-trails-with-horses etiquette, folks.- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 37 of 37
  1. #1
    Bicyclochondriac.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    14,174

    Let's keep up that sharing-the-trails-with-horses etiquette, folks.

    I read a lot about biker-horse rider conflicts on these boards, but in my experience, all the equestrians I encounter here in southwest VA on the trails have been very pleasant and friendly. Also, everyone I ride with is considerate of horses as well. I saw something on the trail yesterday at that just made me cringe. I was riding behind a few guys on a fire road downhill, and up ahead on the trail there are three people on horses. We all slowed down. The two guys looked at each other, and then one of them takes off and hits a stunt/berm on the side of the trail and comes down right behind the last horse, which is startled and starts bucking around, at which point the guy slams on his brakes. He seemed surprised by the horses reaction. The woman was actually apologizing for the horse freaking out around the guy. I think she had no idea what he had actually done.

    Anyway, my point is that I guess not everyone out there has been taught how to deal with horses, and we need to make sure newer riders know what the deal is. This stuff seems obvious to many of us, but if you know nothing of horses, perhaps it is not.

    So for those who don't know............. NEVER come up behind a horse without calling out well in advance, so the rider can at least have a chance to make way and settle the horse if needed. Plan on passing very slowly. Landing a stunt behind one is just plain stupid, and is asking for a very bad situation (serious injury), for the rider or yourself. This is the stuff that Darwin Awards are made of.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: LaLD's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    432
    My son and I ride with small cow bells (goat bells really) attached to our seats. they make all the noise that is needed to warn equestrians, hikers, joggers, and other bikers that we are coming. they work great as long as the others in question aren't wearing i-pods, which should be banned from all multi-use trails with limited visibility.
    2011 Niner EMD
    Wounds Heal, Chicks dig scars, Glory lasts FOREVER!

  3. #3
    Bicyclochondriac.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    14,174
    Quote Originally Posted by LaLD
    My son and I ride with small cow bells (goat bells really) attached to our seats. they make all the noise that is needed to warn equestrians, hikers, joggers, and other bikers that we are coming.
    If I though a cow was coming around the corner moving at biking speeds, I'd definitely get out of the way!

  4. #4
    song of the saw-whet owl
    Reputation: oldnoob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    428
    I always knew about yielding the trail to the horses, altho thats kinda obvious! But I didn't know about the "all riders to the same side of the trail" till a few weeks ago on a group ride.
    (image ripped off from cabledude)

    just another piece of chaga

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: LaLD's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    432
    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta
    If I though a cow was coming around the corner moving at biking speeds, I'd definitely get out of the way!
    cows can move pretty darn quick when running downhill. plus, i think cows invented singletrack.
    2011 Niner EMD
    Wounds Heal, Chicks dig scars, Glory lasts FOREVER!

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    551
    uhh ohh....sounds like i might know who the guys were..

    coming from a family of horse people i try to lead by example when im out on the trail. some horses will freak out when they see a bicycle

    i personally wouldnt ride such a horse on multi-user trails but some will anyways.

    i know your car had a 'run-in' with a horse. sean castles car did too...

  7. #7
    The White Jeff W
    Reputation: jeffw-13's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    5,675
    I've had nothing but pleasant exchanges with equestrians. Hikers, on the other hand....

    A woman I work with rides horses on a lot of the same trails I ride. She says most of the bikers she encounters are friendly but has had several unpleasant experiences with hikers. My experience has been pretty much the same.
    No moss...

  8. #8
    Bicyclochondriac.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    14,174
    Quote Originally Posted by jeffw-13
    I've had nothing but pleasant exchanges with equestrians. Hikers, on the other hand....

    A woman I work with rides horses on a lot of the same trails I ride. She says most of the bikers she encounters are friendly but has had several unpleasant experiences with hikers. My experience has been pretty much the same.
    Huh, it's always been good with hikers for me as well (at least around here).

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mudforlunch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    560
    After nearly being killed by a horse at about 30-40mph on a DH run in Colorado a few years ago, I maintain that mountain bike and equestrian trails should not be shared. If they are shared, they should only be done on relatively flat trails. Its too dangerous in steep areas, theres not nearly enough time to react.

  10. #10
    Bicyclochondriac.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    14,174
    Quote Originally Posted by mudforlunch
    After nearly being killed by a horse at about 30-40mph on a DH run in Colorado a few years ago, I maintain that mountain bike and equestrian trails should not be shared. If they are shared, they should only be done on relatively flat trails. Its too dangerous in steep areas, theres not nearly enough time to react.
    Who was going 30-40 mph, you or the horse?

  11. #11
    www.justthebonnet.com
    Reputation: Capt_phun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,475
    How bout this... Can we get equestrians to clean up after their pets?! I have to clean up my dogs crap, so what about all this horse poop that litters the trails & pollutes the water, not to mention getting in in your tires, on your water bottle, in your shoes, in your teeth, etc.

    I'm sure someone has invented horse diapers. Yep sure has been:
    Oh, AMISH horse diapers, nice!
    http://ohligarchy.blogspot.com/2005/...e-diapers.html
    Capt_Phun's Riding Blog:
    http://captphun.blogspot.com/

    I better go get my headlamp while I'm sober....ish

  12. #12
    the unvarnished nonsense
    Reputation: davis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,832
    Quote Originally Posted by Capt_phun
    How bout this... Can we get equestrians to clean up after their pets?! I have to clean up my dogs crap, so what about all this horse poop that litters the trails & pollutes the water, not to mention getting in in your tires, on your water bottle, in your shoes, in your teeth, etc.

    I'm sure someone has invented horse diapers. Yep sure has been:
    Oh, AMISH horse diapers, nice!
    http://ohligarchy.blogspot.com/2005/...e-diapers.html
    Amen. I was just thinking the same thing. Technically, horses are introducing invasive plant species into the National Forest, which is illegal. Riding a horse on public trails without a horse diaper should be illegal.

    I do follow the rules, but gots no love for the huge trail polluters.
    "Sufficient to have stood, yet free to fall."
    -John Milton, Paradise Lost

  13. #13
    featherweight clydesdale
    Reputation: Fattirewilly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
    Posts
    1,381
    Quote Originally Posted by mudforlunch
    After nearly being killed by a horse at about 30-40mph on a DH run in Colorado a few years ago, I maintain that mountain bike and equestrian trails should not be shared. If they are shared, they should only be done on relatively flat trails. Its too dangerous in steep areas, theres not nearly enough time to react.
    Sounds like you suffered for failing to maintain control of your bike, given the conditions and sight distance on the trail. Just because it is pointed down, doesn't give you the right to ride like you're on a closed course. What if it had been a hiker that you hit, an up hill rider, or a big boulder/log that just fell into the trail? Sorry, but you're in left field here.

    Have you actually thought about the amount of trail that could be lost to mt bikes with this kind of mentality? Some folks spend many hours a year sticking up for mt biking access and negotiating with land managers, doing trail work etc. Its people with this kind of mentality that screw stuff up.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mudforlunch's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Posts
    560
    Quote Originally Posted by Fattirewilly
    Sounds like you suffered for failing to maintain control of your bike, given the conditions and sight distance on the trail. Just because it is pointed down, doesn't give you the right to ride like you're on a closed course. What if it had been a hiker that you hit, an up hill rider, or a big boulder/log that just fell into the trail? Sorry, but you're in left field here.

    Have you actually thought about the amount of trail that could be lost to mt bikes with this kind of mentality? Some folks spend many hours a year sticking up for mt biking access and negotiating with land managers, doing trail work etc. Its people with this kind of mentality that screw stuff up.
    First off, the trail I was on is a known DH run that hikers and riders are well aware of, and they always move out of the way and have more than enough time to do so. Furthermore, the trail is one that I rode on a daily basis, knew like the back of my hand, and that other DH riders would use to train on. You cant really ride it uphill anyways unless you can somehow levitate up four and five foot drops. Horses however, do not and cannot move out of the way in time, and tend to react unpredictably when a bike comes barreling toward them. I'm not saying horses and bikes cant be on the same trails completely, I'm saying that trying to take a horse up a ridiculously steep extremely well known pretty much one-way run is asking for problems. And if I have to ride my local established runs like a sally, then whats the point of getting on my bike?

  15. #15
    Bicyclochondriac.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    14,174
    Quote Originally Posted by mudforlunch
    First off, the trail I was on is a known DH run that hikers and riders are well aware of, and they always move out of the way and have more than enough time to do so. Furthermore, the trail is one that I rode on a daily basis, knew like the back of my hand, and that other DH riders would use to train on. You cant really ride it uphill anyways unless you can somehow levitate up four and five foot drops. Horses however, do not and cannot move out of the way in time, and tend to react unpredictably when a bike comes barreling toward them. I'm not saying horses and bikes cant be on the same trails completely, I'm saying that trying to take a horse up a ridiculously steep extremely well known pretty much one-way run is asking for problems. And if I have to ride my local established runs like a sally, then whats the point of getting on my bike?
    OK, you gave a very specific instance of where one should probably not ride a horse, hike, ride up hill, etc., assuming that riders built the trail to start with for the purpose of riding DH, or it has been well established as a DH only run. Well, if you are saying that there should be dedicated DH runs I can agree (but that is entirely different from saying they can only share flat trails) However, they are going to make up a tiny fraction of the trails around here (remember what regional board you are on), and this holds true for anywhere else in the country I've ridden as well. The view that anyone on a steep slope needs to be able to clear the way for a downhill rider out of control is preposterous. The world does not revolve around DH riders. I love to open it up on downhills, but honestly, if you can't ride in a way that does not endanger anyone not doing what you are, then you have no business on the trail unless it was built for your purpose. Maybe that was the case where you were. It is NOT the case with the other 99% of the trails on hills/mountains.

  16. #16
    www.justthebonnet.com
    Reputation: Capt_phun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,475
    Quote Originally Posted by mudforlunch
    First off, the trail I was on is a known DH run that hikers and riders are well aware of, and they always move out of the way and have more than enough time to do so. Furthermore, the trail is one that I rode on a daily basis, knew like the back of my hand, and that other DH riders would use to train on. You cant really ride it uphill anyways unless you can somehow levitate up four and five foot drops. Horses however, do not and cannot move out of the way in time, and tend to react unpredictably when a bike comes barreling toward them. I'm not saying horses and bikes cant be on the same trails completely, I'm saying that trying to take a horse up a ridiculously steep extremely well known pretty much one-way run is asking for problems. And if I have to ride my local established runs like a sally, then whats the point of getting on my bike?
    Sorry man, but no matter how you spin this story, YOU ARE WRONG. Hikers, bikers, horse riders, joggers, it doesn't matter who they are, they have the RIGHT OF WAY ascending the trail. If you are descending then YOU ARE TO Yield the right of way.
    You need to learn trail etiquette. I've had aholes that bomb down the trail as I grind my way up the climb & almost knock me over. God save an ahole who knocks someone over who is ascending because the descender does not have the courtesy to slow down & yield the trail.
    Capt_Phun's Riding Blog:
    http://captphun.blogspot.com/

    I better go get my headlamp while I'm sober....ish

  17. #17
    Uit Nederland
    Reputation: fujirider1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    342
    No doubt on the crapping rule. They leave huge mounds of poop right in the middle of the trail. Then I should just be able to leave my broken tubes laying around and ride past the horses screaming like an idiot. Most bikers seem to be eco-friendly and considerate people, so why do horse riders get to leave poop everywhere? Horses are stupid, go ride a bike.

  18. #18
    Bicyclochondriac.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    14,174
    Quote Originally Posted by fujirider1
    No doubt on the crapping rule. They leave huge mounds of poop right in the middle of the trail. Then I should just be able to leave my broken tubes laying around and ride past the horses screaming like an idiot. Most bikers seem to be eco-friendly and considerate people, so why do horse riders get to leave poop everywhere? Horses are stupid, go ride a bike.
    The best is when they poop in the mud, and you can't tell what you are going through. Ick!

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation: LaLD's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    432
    Quote Originally Posted by fujirider1
    No doubt on the crapping rule. They leave huge mounds of poop right in the middle of the trail. Then I should just be able to leave my broken tubes laying around and ride past the horses screaming like an idiot. Most bikers seem to be eco-friendly and considerate people, so why do horse riders get to leave poop everywhere? Horses are stupid, go ride a bike.
    you have to pick up after your dog, well, horse = big dog. after all, i clean up after my bike.
    2011 Niner EMD
    Wounds Heal, Chicks dig scars, Glory lasts FOREVER!

  20. #20
    Uit Nederland
    Reputation: fujirider1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    342
    Oh yeah, for sure, I never leave anything on the trail, and I regularly attend local trail building events. But I find that a lot of horse riders just don't pick up after their horse. If you want to ride something that big, then you should be willing to clean up after something that big.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: LaLD's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    432
    all they need is one of these

    http://www.bunbag.com/
    2011 Niner EMD
    Wounds Heal, Chicks dig scars, Glory lasts FOREVER!

  22. #22
    the unvarnished nonsense
    Reputation: davis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,832
    I used to ride in a place that opened up to equestrians but only on a limited basis. We pull into the lot one day (opening day for horses) and there's a bunch of horse riders there and a park ranger. We know what's going down, but the ranger informs us that "its the opening day of horse season". I replied back, "that's great, how many are we allowed to shoot?"

    You should have seen the looks I got from the equestrians. No sense of humor, those people.
    "Sufficient to have stood, yet free to fall."
    -John Milton, Paradise Lost

  23. #23

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12
    Going back to the original post; if a horse can't handle being around bikers/hikers maybe he shouldn't be taken on a public trail. I wouldn't take a dog that loves to chase bikers out on a trail and say "you should have known better than to ride by him" when he takes a bite out of someones ankle.

    As a side note, if bikers are expected to know how to act around a horse perhaps the rider should know not to park their animal in a stunt landing zone.

  24. #24
    www.justthebonnet.com
    Reputation: Capt_phun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,475
    Quote Originally Posted by DirtBiter
    Going back to the original post; if a horse can't handle being around bikers/hikers maybe he shouldn't be taken on a public trail. I wouldn't take a dog that loves to chase bikers out on a trail and say "you should have known better than to ride by him" when he takes a bite out of someones ankle.

    As a side note, if bikers are expected to know how to act around a horse perhaps the rider should know not to park their animal in a stunt landing zone.
    I think some bikers need to open their minds & understand that horses are skittish & can be frightened by an object almost their size (a person on a bike) storming at them. While I am not a huge horse fan, they still have a right to enjoy the trails & outdoors as long as everyone follows proper trail etiquette. "Why can't we all get along?"

    Also, I am a dog owner & again trail etiquette, in most parks dogs need to be leashed, ankle biter or not. Your "me first" mentality is what keeps mtn bikers viewed as "extreme" sports aholes.

    as for "open horse season" comment.... you think you can fit one in a deep fryer????
    Capt_Phun's Riding Blog:
    http://captphun.blogspot.com/

    I better go get my headlamp while I'm sober....ish

  25. #25
    the unvarnished nonsense
    Reputation: davis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,832
    Quote Originally Posted by Capt_phun

    as for "open horse season" comment.... you think you can fit one in a deep fryer????
    But there's no wings on 'em. Just think how big those babies would be! No wonder the winged horses went extinct. Too many prehistoric wing nights.
    "Sufficient to have stood, yet free to fall."
    -John Milton, Paradise Lost

  26. #26
    Bicyclochondriac.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    14,174
    Quote Originally Posted by DirtBiter
    Going back to the original post; if a horse can't handle being around bikers/hikers maybe he shouldn't be taken on a public trail. I wouldn't take a dog that loves to chase bikers out on a trail and say "you should have known better than to ride by him" when he takes a bite out of someones ankle.

    As a side note, if bikers are expected to know how to act around a horse perhaps the rider should know not to park their animal in a stunt landing zone.
    This post is an example of people's ignorance of horses and why we need to teach them what is OK around a horse. Riding by a horse after announcing yourself is one thing. Clearly if the horse can't handle that then it should not be out there. Having a rider drop off a berm right behind one (unannounced) is different. If I jumped out from behind a tree and scared your dog from behind and it snapped at me, I'd consider that my own fault.

    And as a side note, these people were not parked in a landing zone, they were just going down a fire road in plain sight.

  27. #27

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12
    I'm not trying to say that we can't all enjoy the trails. As a matter of fact I have encountered horses, hikers and bikers on trails and have yet to have a bad experience. What I am saying is that you can't expect people to learn about horse safety in case they see one the trail. It's just not realistic. Thankfully most horseback riders know this and take measures to keep themselves and those around them safe. In the same way, we as mountain bikers understand (or should understand) that hikers don't know that we can't come to a dead stop after we rip down a bermed switchback. It's our job to keep them safe by slowing down or only ripping on established DH courses.

    And yes, up until six months ago I was ignorant about horses. I thought you could run around shooting pistols (cowboy movies) and they would never notice.

  28. #28
    Bicyclochondriac.
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    14,174
    Quote Originally Posted by DirtBiter
    What I am saying is that you can't expect people to learn about horse safety in case they see one the trail. It's just not realistic. :
    Perhaps this is where we differ in opinion. My point in this post is that we who know better should make bikers aware of a few things with regard to horses that will make things on the trail run more smoothly.

    If what you are saying is that we can't expect everyone to just know proper trail etiquette on their own, I agree. That's why we need to educate those who don't know. It's like the first time I hiked out of bounds to hit some fresh powder out west. I was one of the first up there and took these huge turns and was all over the place. It had never occurred to me to keep my turns a little tighter and consistent so that there was more fresh areas for those behind me. I had to be told.

    I guess I was just surprised that there were those who did not know the deal with horses considering how many we have around here. I guess they just did not know.

  29. #29

    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    12
    Quote Originally Posted by kapusta
    If what you are saying is that we can't expect everyone to just know proper trail etiquette on their own, I agree.

    I guess I was just surprised that there were those who did not know the deal with horses considering how many we have around here. I guess they just did not know.
    Exactly. We have to try and understand where the other person is coming from as much as possible and do are best to respect each other on the trails.

  30. #30
    mtbr member
    Reputation: LaLD's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    432
    i don't mind the horses, don't really care much for fresh horse poo. most of the horse back riders i've ran into have been nice and courteous. they wait at the top of the climbs for me to get up to the top, and allow me to go ahead on the downhills (at least so far) but i do hate running through the big wet ones on a tight trail. once again, get a bell, it saves lots of trouble. now, if we want to talk about walkers, joggers, runners, hikers with i-pods, that's a totally different story.
    2011 Niner EMD
    Wounds Heal, Chicks dig scars, Glory lasts FOREVER!

  31. #31
    www.justthebonnet.com
    Reputation: Capt_phun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,475
    Don't even start on anyone with an I-pod on the trails. That even applies to bikers. Arrgghh.
    I think the worse case scenario would be a:
    horseback HIKER wearing spandex & jogging shoes with an Ipod who likes to huck jumps. Total ahole there.
    Capt_Phun's Riding Blog:
    http://captphun.blogspot.com/

    I better go get my headlamp while I'm sober....ish

  32. #32
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Posts
    638
    1. It's a multi use trail. You have no legal standing to say a horse was in the way: bikes yield to all other users.
    2. Uphill users always have the right of way. Learn to use your brakes or get off the bike.
    3. Equestrian riders should be punished for not cleaning up - it ruins the trail for others and causes environmental issues.
    4. Anyone who feels that they do not need to be considerate or cautious around a horse should spend a good 10 minutes on a farm playing with them - as long as you approach with respect, they have no problems with you. Sometimes, they don't recognize a bike as a human being, and they flip out. Horses are also not un-afraid of humans - you can chase and coral them as well on foot as you could any other way.
    5. It's a multi use trail. Advocacy for the trails comes from many sides, and being ignorant or inconsiderate stresses relationships and makes it more difficult for us to get more trails.

    This argument is like people complaining about being pulled over for speeding because they "didn't know the speed limit" - by using the trail / car, you understand that you are responsible to know and abide by the rules, and failure to do so means you are a royal ass, and forfeit any right to complain about anything.
    Quote Originally Posted by sickspeed16
    Your not all mountain unless your runnin' crushed dew cans..
    '12 Scalpel 29er Carbon 1
    '13 SuperSix EVO Red Racing

  33. #33
    mtbr member
    Reputation: LaLD's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    432
    Quote Originally Posted by Capt_phun
    Don't even start on anyone with an I-pod on the trails. That even applies to bikers. Arrgghh.
    I think the worse case scenario would be a:
    horseback HIKER wearing spandex & jogging shoes with an Ipod who likes to huck jumps. Total ahole there.
    you are correct sir, no bikers with i-pods on singletrack either. maybe IMBA needs to amend their rules to take i-pods into account..
    2011 Niner EMD
    Wounds Heal, Chicks dig scars, Glory lasts FOREVER!

  34. #34
    the unvarnished nonsense
    Reputation: davis's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,832
    That's it! That's the answer! All we have to do is get the horses to wear iPods, then they'll be oblivious when we blow by them at high speed!
    "Sufficient to have stood, yet free to fall."
    -John Milton, Paradise Lost

  35. #35
    www.justthebonnet.com
    Reputation: Capt_phun's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    1,475
    Quote Originally Posted by davis
    That's it! That's the answer! All we have to do is get the horses to wear iPods, then they'll be oblivious when we blow by them at high speed!
    Mmmm Buffalo Horse Wings with I-pod sauce. Sounds decadent.
    Didn't WV Kayaker try to set up a sound system on his bike for Slatyfork Shuffle with 18" speakers but we "talked" him out of it Mmmm WVKayaker cooked in hot sauce with a side of Jump Hucker stuffed jalapenos...wrapped in bacon of course*



    *damn pain pills make me dellusionally hungry
    Capt_Phun's Riding Blog:
    http://captphun.blogspot.com/

    I better go get my headlamp while I'm sober....ish

  36. #36
    Pedaler of dirt
    Reputation: marzjennings's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    903
    Quote Originally Posted by mudforlunch
    First off, the trail I was on is a known DH run that hikers and riders are well aware of, and they always move out of the way and have more than enough time to do so. Furthermore, the trail is one that I rode on a daily basis, knew like the back of my hand, and that other DH riders would use to train on. You cant really ride it uphill anyways unless you can somehow levitate up four and five foot drops. Horses however, do not and cannot move out of the way in time, and tend to react unpredictably when a bike comes barreling toward them. I'm not saying horses and bikes cant be on the same trails completely, I'm saying that trying to take a horse up a ridiculously steep extremely well known pretty much one-way run is asking for problems. And if I have to ride my local established runs like a sally, then whats the point of getting on my bike?
    Great, another idiot you doesn't know how to ride a bike on shared trails.

    Unless the trails is signed and designated as one way, downhill and mountain bikes only, you have to ride within limits where you'll be able to stop if someone else is blocking the trail. That includes hikers and horse riders coming up the trail.

    We used to ride timed runs on a public trails, training for downhill races, but when we did someone always had to police the bottom of the trail incase a hiker or horse rider started to come up.
    It's not enough that we do our best; sometimes we have to do what's required.

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    551
    Quote Originally Posted by Capt_phun
    Don't even start on anyone with an I-pod on the trails. That even applies to bikers. Arrgghh.
    I think the worse case scenario would be a:
    horseback HIKER wearing spandex & jogging shoes with an Ipod who likes to huck jumps. Total ahole there.
    thats the funniest thing ive experienced today

    thanks!

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.