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Thread: A Beginner

  1. #1
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    A Beginner

    Evening -

    I live in central Virginia and for the past few years, I could be found on the forest roads in and around Virginia offroading in my truck. Recently I've decided to lessen my impact on the forest and to reduce the amount of wear, tear, and money spent on my truck. I'd like to get into mountain biking on the Jeep trails and forest roads that can be found in western Virginia.

    There are many roads/trails that are gated off, but if you have a moutain bike you can continue past. In particular, there are quite a few trails/roads that will take you right to the West Virginia border that I would like to explore.

    I know most of the trails/roads well and the amount of climbs, rocks, water crossings, and such are numerous. What beginner bike under $500 works well in our area for the Jeep trails and fire roads? I have no interest in racing, commuting, or riding on designated mountain bike trails. I do have an interest in night riding and camping out while biking.

    How practical is carrying two nights worth of ultralight backpacking gear on your back while on the bike? Any advice on what backpack works best for mountain biking?

    Thanks

  2. #2
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    do you know of any bike shops in your area? this website has a bike shop search on the main page. they will be more than happy to get you going.

    500 dollar hardtail is a term i hear quite often. just about every bike company has a bike or several that fall in that price range.

  3. #3
    CrgCrkRyder
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    I am guessing you could carry enough backpacking gear to camp for several days if you go lightweight. I don't know of any backpacking gear that crosses over into the MTB realm, but you could get a large hydration pack designed for armor and such that would be pretty large volume.
    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...tion+Pack.aspx

    You could also use a rear rack. Too much weight there though and your front-end wants to bob up.

    I started out on Forest Service roads and Rails to Rails and still enjoy some of that. Be careful, if you find yourself on singletrack you just might get hooked like I did.

    Lots of good lights out there for night riding, but they are quite expensive. If you ride a lot at night you will want to get good $ lights, if you just ride a little (like coming out of the woods at dusk) you can probably go cheaper.

  4. #4
    it's....
    Reputation: Strafer's Avatar
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    Those trails that are gated prolly are private property.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Strafer
    Those trails that are gated prolly are private property.
    not necessarily

    just have gates up to keep trucks out

  6. #6
    CrgCrkRyder
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    Many Forest Service roads are gated. Luckily we are allowed to roll on behind the gates.

  7. #7
    Because I am !
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    Quote Originally Posted by CraigCreekRider
    I started out on Forest Service roads and Rails to Rails and still enjoy some of that. Be careful, if you find yourself on singletrack you just might get hooked like I did.

    Hey CCR, same thing happened to me. Didn't like getting nearly run over on the road in
    my area, so we turned to the nearby rail trail and logging roads with the kids when they
    were small. Then made the mistake one day of taking one of those singletracks off of Canaan Loop Road. Now it's like a drug, can't get enough.... Gotta love it.

    Hey southernpine85, get the bike that fits you and feels good to you. Everyone has an
    opinion of the best bike but all that matters is that you get the one you like best for the
    money you have to spend. I just bought a $500 dollar hardtail last year as a second bike
    to play around on (where my full suspension was overkill) and fell in love with the crazy
    thing. My FS thinks it's been put is storage.

    Hope to see ya on the trails someday. And I'm sure you'll get there .

    ODN
    Caffeine ! "Do stupid things faster and with more energy" ! !

  8. #8
    D'OH- Homer (simpson)
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    $500 budget means a hardtail. i recommend something in a diamondback, such as a a response, or a topanga. I recommend the topanga, it gives you the most bang for the buck. they go for 600 but i was able to snag mine on clearence for 300. its a bit on the heavyish side, but its not too much, its fine. you get rock shox and hayes disc breaks, its nice
    I LIKE PIE

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