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  1. #101
    Ride Fast Take Chances :)
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    LOL. I seen grant out riding his steel touring bikes with baskets in the hills around Walnut Creek. It works but can't see it being "fun".
    Making shit harder than it needs to be isn't awesome, it's just...harder.

  2. #102
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    Would you buy a new vintage-style MTB?-romanhunq_sl-1.jpg

    I just contributed to the Hail Mary fund.

  3. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Burns View Post
    I'm going to read this thread, but I want to respond to the Altus derailleur comment.

    I'm about to install an Altus rear mech on a bike only because I read about it on the Rivendell site, and I figured I will give it a go. It's affordable. I have an old XTR on there , which works just okay, but I want to see if there is am improvement. I'll report back when I have it all done and tested.

    I'm not concerned about weight as much as I am about the way a machine feels when operated.

    Can't wait to read this thread.

    Sent from my LG-H910 using Tapatalk
    Altus derailleur system is fully functional. Testing this out, and yes it shifts very smooth and quietly.

    I like it.

    Maybe it looks bad.

    Because I changed the cables, rear wheel, chain, cassette, and bottom bracket, it's impossible to say the system is good because of the derailleur though.

    It's 9 speed.

    It's is not a light derailleur.

    Fine for this commuter bike.

    I wouldn't run the Altus rear derailleur on a mountainbike because it looks like those huge pulleys would catch more brush and grass etc.

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  4. #104
    artistic...
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack Burns View Post
    Altus derailleur system is fully functional. Testing this out, and yes it shifts very smooth and quietly.

    I like it.

    Maybe it looks bad.

    Because I changed the cables, rear wheel, chain, cassette, and bottom bracket, it's impossible to say the system is good because of the derailleur though.

    It's 9 speed.

    It's is not a light derailleur.

    Fine for this commuter bike.

    I wouldn't run the Altus rear derailleur on a mountainbike because it looks like those huge pulleys would catch more brush and grass etc.

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    Weighs the same as a Deore DX long cage which has a cult following in Europe.
    I am with Grant: i get no satisfaction from derrailleurs. I rather put my money on exquisite crank sets.
    WTB: Bomber Z2 1 1/8 steerer, in good to excellent shape OR bomber rebuild kit.

  5. #105
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    Pretty stellar klunker in honour of Jeff at First Flight on The Radavist in case you missed it.

    2018 NAHBS: Groovy Cycleworks Jeff Archer Homage Klunker | The Radavist

  6. #106
    DFA
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    Don't see the point of putting a deposit down to go on a waiting list to spend large on an new "vintage style" bike when you can search Kijiji and find OG vintage Prestige/732 bikes that may have been ridden up and down the sidewalk a half dozen times for $165.


  7. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by DFA View Post
    Don't see the point of putting a deposit down to go on a waiting list to spend large on an new "vintage style" bike when you can search Kijiji and find OG vintage Prestige/732 bikes that may have been ridden up and down the sidewalk a half dozen times for $165.

    Good point there mate.

    Old bikes are for sale, and if one looks hard enough, they might find one that fits and is the type that will satisfy. As well, there is something good about recycling, that pleases an economic aesthetic.

    On the other hand, ordering a custom bike, or something like a Rivendell or VeloOrange bike is positive as well, given that it supports this vintage type of bike industry.

    No matter what, I hope there is a steady demand for such bikes, because they are relevant, are good to see out there, and remind us of certain aesthetic, technical, and economic realities.

    Also I want to be able to get new bottom bracket when I need them.

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  8. #108
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    I have two modern "vintage" bikes. A 29er GT Peace with no suspension 3X9, and more recently a Sun Bicycle RevMX. The GT is my pavement bike, and the Sun a Florida cruiser. For off-road I revert to my full-suspension bike.

    I enjoy riding any bike. It's not about the bike so much, as the ride itself.

  9. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by DFA View Post
    Don't see the point of putting a deposit down to go on a waiting list to spend large on an new "vintage style" bike when you can search Kijiji and find OG vintage Prestige/732 bikes that may have been ridden up and down the sidewalk a half dozen times for $165.

    Looks like you got a nice one there.

    Yeah, there's no accounting for fire sales... I have been on both ends of that one and it's great when it works out in your favor.

    Lots of possible reasons, but the "it's cheaper" aspect of VRC has never been all that compelling to me. It is certainly a privilege, but I try to do my best to listen to the demands of the project and spend accordingly to get what I'm after. Despite earning a living as a mechanic during the time period I'm most interested in, I find I naturally look for NOS or near NOS (drivetrain especially) as I can usually take that reliability to the bank.

    Part of the "would you buy" question though - in my head anyway - definitely speaks to supporting current framebuilders/existing brands though.

  10. #110
    Just A Mountain Biker.
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    This is about as ďvintageĒ as I want to go. I like the ďtime capsuleĒ comment from earlier in this thread, because that is what this bike is to me. It was made 10 years after I started riding, but it encapsulates what I love about mountain bikes; simple triangle frame with straight lines, steep but not deadly geometry, steel and fast. Itís also similar to what I crawled around the hills of Temecula on in the late 80ís/early 90ís. Yes itís a 26 and I am struggling to find/decide on tires, but at this point Iím just going to throw on some new Ikon 2.35ís and call it good, I canít mind screw it anymore. The bars, while klunker-ish and not really even close to period correct just looked right to me and help my back that canít take being hunched over anymore.

    So I would buy something like this, yes, but in a 27.5 and disc for the availability of tires and wheels - I could have any custom builder do that. But I am perfectly happy with this for the time being.




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  11. #111
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    Quote Originally Posted by blaklabl View Post
    This is about as ďvintageĒ as I want to go. I like the ďtime capsuleĒ comment from earlier in this thread, because that is what this bike is to me. It was made 10 years after I started riding, but it encapsulates what I love about mountain bikes; simple triangle frame with straight lines, steep but not deadly geometry, steel and fast.
    Eno hub or magic gear?

    I'm sure you built it for your own approval and not that of anyone else, but for what it's worth, I really like that. Mish-mash of parts thrown together because they function and get the job done, on a frame that is an ol' faithful. I have a 26" rigid SS which I love. Nothing like having to power wheelie or hop over obstacles because you left the suspension at home, as well as the simplicity and reliability of it all.

    There was a single track loop that I rode when I first started riding MTB. It offered it all, sand, creek crossings, climbs, a long downhill, swoopy stuff. All good. Sometimes, I take a vintage bike out there and let the lack of technology take me back to that time when it was new and it was an adventure to be out there until the light started to fade.

    Damn you families and careers for making life complex. Thank you 3x7, rigid steel and canti brakes for the guilty pleasure of sneaking back to the past.

    Grumps

  12. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by blaklabl View Post
    This is about as ďvintageĒ as I want to go. I like the ďtime capsuleĒ comment from earlier in this thread, because that is what this bike is to me. It was made 10 years after I started riding, but it encapsulates what I love about mountain bikes; simple triangle frame with straight lines, steep but not deadly geometry, steel and fast. Itís also similar to what I crawled around the hills of Temecula on in the late 80ís/early 90ís. Yes itís a 26 and I am struggling to find/decide on tires, but at this point Iím just going to throw on some new Ikon 2.35ís and call it good, I canít mind screw it anymore. The bars, while klunker-ish and not really even close to period correct just looked right to me and help my back that canít take being hunched over anymore.

    So I would buy something like this, yes, but in a 27.5 and disc for the availability of tires and wheels - I could have any custom builder do that. But I am perfectly happy with this for the time being.




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    Very nice! Hard to tell in the pics, but what bars are those?

  13. #113
    Just A Mountain Biker.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Grumpy View Post
    Eno hub or magic gear?

    I'm sure you built it for your own approval and not that of anyone else, but for what it's worth, I really like that. Mish-mash of parts thrown together because they function and get the job done, on a frame that is an ol' faithful. I have a 26" rigid SS which I love. Nothing like having to power wheelie or hop over obstacles because you left the suspension at home, as well as the simplicity and reliability of it all.

    There was a single track loop that I rode when I first started riding MTB. It offered it all, sand, creek crossings, climbs, a long downhill, swoopy stuff. All good. Sometimes, I take a vintage bike out there and let the lack of technology take me back to that time when it was new and it was an adventure to be out there until the light started to fade.

    Damn you families and careers for making life complex. Thank you 3x7, rigid steel and canti brakes for the guilty pleasure of sneaking back to the past.

    Grumps
    Wow, thanks for the comments. I was trying not to derail the OP but was just trying to express how far back to "vintage" I would be willing to go.

    It is a White Industries ENO hub, by far the most expensive piece on the build. I had Dave Thomas of Dave's Speed Dream wheels lace it up (as well as re-lace the front hub with new nips/spokes) to the original Ritchey rims because they were in such good shape. It was a total CL score, I would do a build thread in VRC of how it was to how it is, but I'm sure that would be frowned upon by the purists in here.
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  14. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by 69tr6r View Post
    Very nice! Hard to tell in the pics, but what bars are those?
    They are Defiance Frameworks "Arise!" bars, based out of Homer, Alaska. When I was putting this together I knew I needed something with an unconventional rise to keep my back happy, but didn't want it to look too goofy. At the time, Surly Sunrise bars didn't exist and all "custom" options were in the $100-$160 range. I picked these out because Daniel at Defiance had a short lead time and was very communicative compared to other cool frame builders floating around the interwebs.

    ARISE! bars. ‚ÄĒ Defiance Frameworks

    Here's a little better pic of them.

    Would you buy a new vintage-style MTB?-img_1844.jpg
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  15. #115
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    Awesome! Thank you!

  16. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by blaklabl View Post
    ....but I'm sure that would be frowned upon by the purists in here.
    I like period correct and authentic but primarily I like to see bikes used. I wouldn't take a pristine bike and strip it down but if it was worn out then sure, repurpose it.

    Provided you're not cutting and shutting or brazing stuff onto the frame, then it can all be removed with hand tools. Go nuts and enjoy it!

    I'd rather see an old frame with modern bits than an old frame in landfill.

    And to bring it back to topic - there's some great builders who can do beautiful custom work, but there's also a supply of great old frames to give some love to. Either way, ride what makes you happy.

    Grumps

  17. #117
    DFA
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    Quote Originally Posted by blaklabl View Post
    Yes itís a 26 and I am struggling to find/decide on tires
    My friend's father is a hoarder. Finding 26s isn't a problem.


  18. #118
    Just A Mountain Biker.
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    Quote Originally Posted by DFA View Post
    My friend's father is a hoarder. Finding 26s isn't a problem.

    Well thatís cool, I donít know a 26Ē tire hoarder so I just had to buy mine.


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  19. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by DFA View Post
    My friend's father is a hoarder. Finding 26s isn't a problem.

    Nor green frames.

    Grumps

  20. #120
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    Also just occurred to me; I would not prefer to go back to 90's tire tech on a serious bike I would actually be riding. While finding 26" tires (current, new) is becoming more difficult, there are still some good higher-end ones. If one isn't trying to be period-correct nostalgia or super hung up on skinwalls, tires like the Ardent & IKON are still widely available and solid choices.
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  21. #121
    Retro on Steroids
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    Ironic thread.

    The editor of MBA, John Ker, asked me for a contribution to be in the next issue. I pointed out that I see 30-y.o. Rockhoppers still being ridden by the original owners. A Rockhopper was an inexpensive bike, and like every other mass produced MTB before about 1984, was designed after the Ritchey MountainBikes that Gary Fisher and I sold.

    The original mountain bike design was so practical and rugged, that even a cheap expression of it like a Rockhopper, is still useful after three decades. You don't see a cheap road bike still in use for that long.

    Don't buy a modern reproduction of an '80s bike, buy the real thing.

  22. #122
    Just A Mountain Biker.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Repack Rider View Post
    Ironic thread.

    The editor of MBA, John Ker, asked me for a contribution to be in the next issue. I pointed out that I see 30-y.o. Rockhoppers still being ridden by the original owners. A Rockhopper was an inexpensive bike, and like every other mass produced MTB before about 1984, was designed after the Ritchey MountainBikes that Gary Fisher and I sold.

    The original mountain bike design was so practical and rugged, that even a cheap expression of it like a Rockhopper, is still useful after three decades. You don't see a cheap road bike still in use for that long.

    Don't buy a modern reproduction of an '80s bike, buy the real thing.
    A lot to unpack here; Charlie Kelly commenting on my bike (cool!) but then calling it cheap at the same time. That kind of sucks, Iím pretty proud of it, sorry itís not a Stumpjumper? Thatís what I wanted but couldnít find one in steel at the time. Maybe some day.

    Anyways great book and thanks for all youíve done for the sport.


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