What happened to bike companies in 1993/94?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 15 of 15
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: shaquille_o'wheel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    69

    What happened to bike companies in 1993/94?

    I was browsing some old mtb articles on MOMBAt and noticed a trend of companies claiming to have complete drivetrains ready for release and what not and then I see nothing about them being released. What happened that prevented these from coming to market?

    Anyone with some insight? Really curious what happened. Grafton and Magic motorcycle are two that come to mind

  2. #2
    Hybrid Leftys aren't real Moderator
    Reputation: MendonCycleSmith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    15,998
    My take?

    Exploding MTB sales, and one main supplier, Shimano.

    Then Sram jumped in with both feet, and everyone else looked at how much it would really cost to push that pony up hill, and went, "meh"....
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

    - FrostyStruthers



    www.mendoncyclesmith.com

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mainlyfats's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    1,175
    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith View Post
    Then Sram jumped in with both feet, and everyone else looked at how much it would really cost to push that pony up hill, and went, "meh"....
    Paul, White Industries and Campagnolo couldn't crack the market. Suntour - the most OG MTB invested drivetrain company - gone. I think people got wise that it wasn't the hill they wanted to die on.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,118
    Quote Originally Posted by mainlyfats View Post
    Paul, White Industries and Campagnolo couldn't crack the market. Suntour - the most OG MTB invested drivetrain company - gone. I think people got wise that it wasn't the hill they wanted to die on.
    Yes. In the years prior and to that time I worked for an engineering & machining company that did work for an industry giant and invested in a small shop owner who sold the neat custom stuff. It was easy to see the scale some had in manufacturing, and the price points where most people would spend. It was also easy to see the ways the giants had innovation, copied it or bought it. It was no surprise that we saw the large players end up dominating. Some of the engineering, fixturing and manufacturing projects my then employer did for a bike firm and others also had a new twist. In the late 80s the millwrights started prototyping and assembling things that would be shipped to manufacturers all over the world. A few of us had some bike suspension ideas and I recall our sales manager and owner saying no way because they were sure a few big players dominate markets more than ever. So yes, on wasn't the hill they wanted to die on.
    ƃuoɹʍ llɐ ʇno əɯɐɔ ʇɐɥʇ

  5. #5
    Cycologist
    Reputation: chazpat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    5,842
    Quote Originally Posted by bitflogger View Post
    Yes. In the years prior and to that time I worked for an engineering & machining company that did work for an industry giant and invested in a small shop owner who sold the neat custom stuff. It was easy to see the scale some had in manufacturing, and the price points where most people would spend. It was also easy to see the ways the giants had innovation, copied it or bought it. It was no surprise that we saw the large players end up dominating. Some of the engineering, fixturing and manufacturing projects my then employer did for a bike firm and others also had a new twist. In the late 80s the millwrights started prototyping and assembling things that would be shipped to manufacturers all over the world. A few of us had some bike suspension ideas and I recall our sales manager and owner saying no way because they were sure a few big players dominate markets more than ever. So yes, on wasn't the hill they wanted to die on.
    Got any pix and/or drawings you could share?

    I imagine they would be hand drawings and you probably don't have them.
    This post is a natural product. Variances in spelling & grammar should be appreciated as part of its character & beauty.

  6. #6
    No known cure
    Reputation: Vader's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    3,164
    Xtr m900
    Ripping trails and tipping ales

  7. #7
    artistic...
    Reputation: colker1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    7,408
    Quote Originally Posted by Vader View Post
    Xtr m900
    Or was it the m950 that killed everything else?
    WTB: Bomber Z2 1 1/8 steerer, in good to excellent shape OR bomber rebuild kit.

  8. #8
    Hybrid Leftys aren't real Moderator
    Reputation: MendonCycleSmith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    15,998
    On a related but completely un VRC related note.

    I freaking hate Shimano. Their business model sucks, they are corporate whores of the highest order, and they listen to nobody but themselves.

    The only thing that sucks and works, worse than Shimano, is, everyone else.

    Dammit.
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

    - FrostyStruthers



    www.mendoncyclesmith.com

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: cegrover's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    1,683
    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith View Post
    On a related but completely un VRC related note.

    I freaking hate Shimano. Their business model sucks, they are corporate whores of the highest order, and they listen to nobody but themselves.

    The only thing that sucks and works, worse than Shimano, is, everyone else.

    Dammit.
    The real question is when Dual Control will be considered VRC!

    Sent from my P01MA using Tapatalk

  10. #10
    Hybrid Leftys aren't real Moderator
    Reputation: MendonCycleSmith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    15,998
    Man, I loved second generation Dual Control when mated with a Rapid Rise RD.

    Stuff worked amazingly well, especially when compared to first gen which was proof of concept and not much else.

    Shimano, being Shimano is what killed it too, kinda like what they've done for themselves now, with their blind eye policy to having or enforcing any MAP pricing on line....

    But I digress.
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

    - FrostyStruthers



    www.mendoncyclesmith.com

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    2
    It's a good thing Doug and Paul didn't work for your boss in the late 80s...

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: robinmiller's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2005
    Posts
    462
    Basically it was a LOT harder to create a drivetrain that worked comparably to Shimano than people thought it was going to be. A bunch of companies thought they could do it and cash in on the CNC component craze and the anti-Shimano sentiment in the early 90's, and their marketing people went off and made pie in the sky claims that they'd have a Shimano-killer groupset for sale in 6 months tops, or whatever, as marketing people always do while the engineers grit their teeth and die inside.

    And then engineering/manufacturing/economic realities set in. It wasn't easy to match Shimano's 30+ years of engineering and manufacturing know-how, let alone industry connections. And even to sell to the boutique high end of the market where price was (almost) no object, nobody in the end wanted a US made derailleur or shifters in 1994 that worked worse than Shimano products from 1984...

    SRAM did it eventually, but they had waaay deeper pockets than most of these small brands, and it took them buying up a lot of the pieces (Sachs/Sedis, Avid, etc). And even then some of their earlier groupsets didn't work all that great (if anyone can get my wife's 2011 SRAM Rival front shifting to not suck, let me know!).

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation: shaquille_o'wheel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Posts
    69
    Totally makes sense. I guess not a whole lot has changed when I think about it....

    The bike industry is so very interesting I can't imagine what's next

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    2,252
    Quote Originally Posted by shaquille_o'wheel View Post
    Totally makes sense. I guess not a whole lot has changed when I think about it....

    The bike industry is so very interesting I can't imagine what's next
    28.25 / 675B No other wheel size will be able to compare.
    Latitude 61

  15. #15
    artistic...
    Reputation: colker1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    7,408
    Check Scot Nicol looking over a (beautifull) white steel ibis mojo built w/ m900, future shock, syncros etc.. at 3:20. At one point he says "wow... we have come a long way".
    I still have all the fun on my steel mojo but would like a Ripmo... thing is: Ibis keeps getting MORE expensive and their bikes geometry keep becoming outdated on a faster pace. 4K for a bike frame that will be improved in 3 yrs.. add a new fork, maybe wheels, cranks.. Itīs a different game now.


    WTB: Bomber Z2 1 1/8 steerer, in good to excellent shape OR bomber rebuild kit.

Similar Threads

  1. Are bike companies becoming like car companies?
    By noot in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 35
    Last Post: 11-18-2017, 04:14 PM
  2. what happened to Marzocchi and manitou forks companies?
    By Picard in forum Shocks and Suspension
    Replies: 35
    Last Post: 08-26-2016, 05:41 PM
  3. Replies: 29
    Last Post: 03-08-2016, 02:54 PM
  4. Old School Snowboard Companies - whatever happened to them??
    By dieselcruiserhead in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 07-20-2008, 09:19 PM
  5. car companies compared to bike companies
    By drdoom in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 05-26-2005, 05:02 AM

Members who have read this thread: 19

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.