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  1. #1
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    My 1995 Ibis Mojo Ti Restomod adventure

    I've always dreamed of a rad 90s hardtail, and in particular, one that was stout enough to handle new school riding on some mellower trails here in the PNW. With my fondness for all things Ibis, I really wanted a steel Mojo, an aluminum Ripley, or a Mojo Ti. After much chatting with Scot, he thought those three would be the most robust options from the OG Ibis days.

    I've always wanted to try riding a titanium bike, and never really had the chance with so many carbon bikes in my life. Now, with how hard it is to find a good Mojo Ti, I basically assumed I'd end up with a steel Mojo. Then I got lucky...



    btw, big thank you to all of you who post here in the vintage forum! This was a huge help as I decided which parts to use on the build!

  2. #2
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    I want to really be able to ride hard on this bike, so after much consulting of this here MTBR Vintage forum, I started to build the bike up. I'm so stoked this thing is a 1 1/8" headtube! With a child hood full of old 1" Bontrager bikes, the modern head tube is a wonderful thing!



    The tubeless, rim brake compatible rim debacle was tough as well. Old Mavic Crossmax wheels would have been great, but the proprietary spokes and questionable hubs had me leaning towards these ZTR 355 rims and more traditional hubs. Thus far, though, so good!

  3. #3
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    And, what I uploaded last night! The full bike check, and first official shred session...



    This thing is SO MUCH FUN! It's a blast, especially on mellower green and blue trails. While modern enduro bikes have created some fast and gnarly lines, this Mojo Ti is a great challenge to pick smoother ways down the mountain. I'm quite pleased with the brakes, too. While nowhere near as strong as my 4 piston M8020 brakes on my other bikes, they definitely do well enough. V brakes would have been nice, but I think the cantis are so much more of a challenge, and I'm stoked to have gone that route. The front brake has enough power to nose wheelie with 1 finger, though the rear is a full on 2 finger situation.

    I'll be posting more to this thread, got a lot planned with this little bike!

  4. #4
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    Sweet JKW! Looking forward to more!


    Why would you own 100 Yugos when you could own 1 Porsche? - Rumpfy



  5. #5
    -bustin punks
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    Nice - thanks for posting the videos. It was nice to get the introduction on CycleSquawk Podcast!

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikenweed View Post
    btw, big thank you to all of you who post here in the vintage forum! This was a huge help as I decided which parts to use on the build!
    Really? I doubt anyone would recommend this build up, aside from Syncros Ti post. I don't think that saddle is from the mid-90's.

    But it's good that you are enjoying the bike!
    **Merry Christmas**

  7. #7
    Phobia of petting zoos.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikenweed View Post
    I'm so stoked this thing is a 1 1/8" headtube! With a child hood full of old 1" Bontrager bikes, the modern head tube is a wonderful thing!
    That made me laugh, 1 1/8" modern... hahaha!

    Congratulations on a few things:

    1. The frame and the build, nice mix of current and old school;

    2. The WTB gonzo nose saddle - one of my all time favourites;

    3. Getting a hair cut half way through the build ;and

    4. Making really enjoyable videos.

    Thoroughly enjoyed the distraction, and congrats on the bike. Great pick up!

    Grumps

  8. #8
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    Great build and cool videos. Very entertaining to watch. Thank you for sharing.

    Was curious though about the geometry of the old bike and how you said it was quite terrifying because of the 71* ha with a 73* SA and how that geo is vastly different from modern geo. However, it is not vastly different from modern geo... at all.

    Even the the 2017 ibis tranny had a 71* ha and a 73* sa. I think the issue your having is that the old ibis is an xc oriented bike so when comparing the geo to a full sus trail or AM bike of course there is going to be big differences in geo like HA and SA steepness. But really, the old ibis geo is perfectly normal for a modern XC hardtail and shouldnít be making that bike anymore scary to ride than a modern bike designed for the same type of XC riding. Maybe it was something else making it feel scary like too long of a stem or a fork that needs to be rebuilt or just not being used to what hard tail XC geometry (of any era) rides like?

    Shoot, the just announced, 2019 Airborn Goblin has a steeper HA* than that old ibis, coming in at a bar flipping 71.5*.

    71/73* is not outdated geometry (given it is still used to this day), itís classic geometry, just like classic sport cars have rear wheel drive and manual transmissions. Sure, those who arenít experienced driving that type of car might call it terrifying, but those who know how to drive have a totally different experience.
    Last edited by singletrackmack; 10-13-2018 at 12:49 AM.
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  9. #9
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    Entertaining videos and fun to watch the build. Looks like a fun ride too.

    Quote Originally Posted by singletrackmack View Post
    ...Maybe it was something else making it feel scary like too long of a stem or a fork that needs to be rebuilt or just not being used to what hard tail XC geometry (of any era) rides like?
    I was thinking about this as the basic frame geometry is really not that different from a modern xc bike. However, when I switch from my more modern long travel 29er to a 90ís bike, the biggest difference for me is how much lower the handle bars on the vintage bike are (especially if rigid) than the modern bike. Even if it has suspension, itís usually less than 80mm, that plus the smaller wheels means a much lower stack. So that I think is what throws people off who are not used to older mtbs is the lower stack, not the HA* or SA*.

    I do have to say I really enjoy the low stack as it keeps you in a much more aggressive position which makes fast twisty trails through the woods really fun. But not in the steeps, thatís where I think it get scarry.

  10. #10
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    Not really a retro guy, as you said JKW, canti's were not fun, but really cool to see this build, saw my first Ti bike in 2004 and have been lusting after owning one ever since.

    Curious why you're even thinking of cutting the bar width down when you've already made this a mix of old and new parts with the 11spd setup, why not just use a shorter stem and keep the width?
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  11. #11
    Hardtail Steel Forever
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikenweed View Post
    I want to really be able to ride hard on this bike, so after much consulting of this here MTBR Vintage forum, I started to build the bike up. I'm so stoked this thing is a 1 1/8" headtube! With a child hood full of old 1" Bontrager bikes, the modern head tube is a wonderful thing!
    I was glad to find a Voodoo Djab when I did my ti SS build a few years ago. It's stupid trying to find decent 1in forks these days.
    WTB: Med Bontrager Ti Lite, PM Me...

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by LyNx View Post
    Not really a retro guy, as you said JKW, canti's were not fun, but really cool to see this build, saw my first Ti bike in 2004 and have been lusting after owning one ever since.

    Curious why you're even thinking of cutting the bar width down when you've already made this a mix of old and new parts with the 11spd setup, why not just use a shorter stem and keep the width?
    Thanks LyNx! On these steep head angle bikes, the longer stems provide a slower steering feel, and the overall balance of the bike works better that way than with something super short and stubby. And believe it or not, the 90mm stem is quite a bit shorter than what the bike was likely going to be specced with originally, I'll bet a 130 stem would have been more common. The bars are still WAY wider than what most folks were running in 1995, so this "compromise set up" actually feels really good and aggressive.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikenweed View Post
    Thanks LyNx! On these steep head angle bikes, the longer stems provide a slower steering feel, and the overall balance of the bike works better that way than with something super short and stubby. And believe it or not, the 90mm stem is quite a bit shorter than what the bike was likely going to be specced with originally, I'll bet a 130 stem would have been more common. The bars are still WAY wider than what most folks were running in 1995, so this "compromise set up" actually feels really good and aggressive.
    I've built a number of vintage bikes with short stems and wide bars and they ride great. You will need a frame slightly bigger than what normally fits though. I typically use a quill stem adaptor (JensonUSA sells them) so I can put modern stems and bars on. I also love to outfit them with 1x drivetrains much like you did. I have a Stowe Phase 3 setup this way that rides amazing even with a mag21 fork.
    The Truth will set you free.

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  14. #14
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    Know it's not the same as yours because it's a 29er, but when I made the move to a 760mm bar/90mm stem and then eventually down to a 70mm stem on my '08 Monkey (from 120mm stem/680mm bar), which has a 71* HTA, the steering improved for the better, seemed to improve with each change, did not become some twitchy thing.

    Quote Originally Posted by bikenweed View Post
    Thanks LyNx! On these steep head angle bikes, the longer stems provide a slower steering feel, and the overall balance of the bike works better that way than with something super short and stubby. And believe it or not, the 90mm stem is quite a bit shorter than what the bike was likely going to be specced with originally, I'll bet a 130 stem would have been more common. The bars are still WAY wider than what most folks were running in 1995, so this "compromise set up" actually feels really good and aggressive.
    One day your life will flash before your eyes, will it be worth watching??

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by bikenweed View Post
    And, what I uploaded last night! The full bike check, and first official shred session...



    This thing is SO MUCH FUN! It's a blast, especially on mellower green and blue trails. While modern enduro bikes have created some fast and gnarly lines, this Mojo Ti is a great challenge to pick smoother ways down the mountain. I'm quite pleased with the brakes, too. While nowhere near as strong as my 4 piston M8020 brakes on my other bikes, they definitely do well enough. V brakes would have been nice, but I think the cantis are so much more of a challenge, and I'm stoked to have gone that route. The front brake has enough power to nose wheelie with 1 finger, though the rear is a full on 2 finger situation.

    I'll be posting more to this thread, got a lot planned with this little bike!
    I have the original steel version from 1996. Used to ride it on Vancouvers North Shore. Full xtr, v brakes, ceramic rims, same bomber fork, short roox riser stem and I gave up on the wtb seat when they stopped making them. Hanging up in the other room right now.

    Always wanted the Ti, but that was serious money back in 96.

    Love the project. Keep me coming.

    tw

  16. #16
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    Great build and videoís, thanks! Also, it reminds me to finish my Bow Ti restomod

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