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  1. #201
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnnybentwrench View Post
    Thanks everyone, The head tube is 650mm and the fork to crown is 16"-16"1/8. Doesn't a rigid fork lower the stand over height? I am not sure why the fork to crown is important as long as a 26" wheel fits right?
    Ironically I sold a GT last year and gave away an incomplete trek 990 frame with rigid fork, BB, Brakes and stem
    The head tube can't be 650mm . Is your axle to crown measurement sagged or un-sagged.?

  2. #202
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fred Smedley View Post
    The head tube can't be 650mm . Is your axle to crown measurement sagged or un-sagged.?
    Sorry, I typed the numbers wrong head tube is 164-165 mm unsagged fork to crown is 16" - 16" 1/8

  3. #203
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    Exactly--don't worry about the sag and measuring fork length. For rigid, you want something under 400mm for your era Trek. The current sus fork length doesn't matter.
    Somec is like the digital Zunow
    And this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JD5h3y0a9AU

  4. #204
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    Quote Originally Posted by yo-Nate-y View Post
    Exactly--don't worry about the sag and measuring fork length. For rigid, you want something under 400mm for your era Trek. The current sus fork length doesn't matter.
    I told him 18 post ago he needed a 395ish fork ............................, apparently that was not good enough answer and he posted his fork. Suppose he likes the way the fork handles?

  5. #205
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    I have not built MTB bikes, but have built a few nice light weight road bikes and have learned the expensive way that not all bike parts interchange. I think I am just going to buy back the frame and fork I gave away last year. It seems cheaper than the rest of the alternatives. I appreciate everyone taking the time to post up what I need and how to take measurements.

  6. #206
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fred Smedley View Post
    I told him 18 post ago he needed a 395ish fork ............................, apparently that was not good enough answer and he posted his fork. Suppose he likes the way the fork handles?
    But suspension to rigid will change those characteristics anyway.
    Somec is like the digital Zunow
    And this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JD5h3y0a9AU

  7. #207
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    Quote Originally Posted by johnnybentwrench View Post
    I have not built MTB bikes, but have built a few nice light weight road bikes and have learned the expensive way that not all bike parts interchange. I think I am just going to buy back the frame and fork I gave away last year. It seems cheaper than the rest of the alternatives. I appreciate everyone taking the time to post up what I need and how to take measurements.
    So how is buying back your old bike cheaper than buying a used 22 year old production fork? That's all you need. The fork and a cable hanger.
    Zip ties? Not on my bike!

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  8. #208
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    I prefer to have the correct fork on the bike. There are no over sized forks to be had at auction. The frame and fork are about twenty dollars more than a hanger and fork and I will have a BB, stem, head set and frame to sell or trade off

  9. #209
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    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-img_0813.jpg

    I just picked this up off craigslist for $200, still had the reflectors on. It's an 18 inch 1999 930 singletrack (last year I think) tripple butted. Fork sucks I might put a Surly rigid on it.
    2013 StumpJumper FSR Comp 29er
    2011 Trek Sawyer 29er
    2000 Bianchi b.u.S.S.
    1999 Trek 930
    1997 Trek 850

  10. #210
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    ... and if we just ...

    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-image.jpgMid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-image.jpg

    Hopefully the above pics have worked! It's my first post, and I'm a little computer illiterate when I comes to attaching pics!

    This is my 1996 Trek 990. Picked the frame up from eBay after searching for it for ages. The for is a Fox F80X with the Terralogic dampening cartridge. I love it. The wheels are XTR M950 hubs laced to Mavic 217 rims. I plan on rebuilding then to DT XR425. I also have the first generation Mavic CrossMax's on the way which are hardly used. Thomson Elite post and stem. Bontrager Race Lite Bar, and old Bontrager/San Marco Ti saddle that I also searched for ages to find!

    The drivetrain pictured on the bike is Sram X0 grip shifters with an X9 rear mech and XT front. Avid SD7 brakes with Speed Dial Ti levers. I've just changed all that. I went to XTR M952 rear mech, and XTR M952 shifters/lever with XTR M951 V brake. I took the optical gear display off to give it a cleaner look. The cranks are RaceFace Turbine. they are lighter than the M952, and the rings shift great! The brakes are way smoother than the Avids, and always stay centred! I can also really back off the spring tension, and make the feel ultra smooth with true single finger braking. The total weight is just under 11KG and will drop with different wheels and tyres.

    I also have some Cane Creek Ergo 2 bar ends, but only put those on when I know I'm doing super long climbs, or spending a lot of time in the saddle. I keep them off when I know I'm going to be on singletrack lots.

    I love this bike, as its a bike I had in the late 90's when I was having my most fun riding. I love riding with guys who have super swag and bling bikes and I just absolutely put the hammer down and watch them question whether they should really be concentrating more on their riding to go faster, over having the latest and greatest..

    Well, this bike definitely isn't the latest, but it sure as hell is the greatest. It'll also always be the coolest bike in any group I ride with! Ok, I know, that last comment was a bit arrogant! But it's true! :-)

  11. #211
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rumpfy View Post
    Because their owners are generally pains in the ass. See: "turn an old trek 850 into cyclocross" bike thread.
    Same with anyone the has ridden a klein!!! $H!T 101!!!!

  12. #212
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    Do you actually ride these bikes or do you side and stare at them like a ****ing sitcom?

  13. #213
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    Make the bike how you want. Ride and enjoy it. Most of these guys here the will tell you the bike sucks. I will tell you no bucks sucks unless it is ridden. There are fanboys on here that will not ride their bikes to preserve them like it is some kind of classic car. Their obsession to this is great. They want the bikes they drooled over as a poor college student or in high school even though they will now not ride them FOR FEAR OF WRECKING. I say ride, enjoy, mod, paint, wreck, bend, thrash and enjoy your bike. As for the bike....good frame....the welding tech is different than the standard aluminum you see today. Those were mostly TIG. It takes about 10 minutes to weld 8 inches. Very precise and a skill that is tough to master. Kind strange now isn't it how aluminum frames are now cheaper than a Tange Cro-mo frame.

  14. #214
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    take your meds
    looking for 20-21" P team

  15. #215
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    Who gives a crap about what someone does with their bike. Why does it matter? Just trying to assert how badass hardcore of a mountain biker elitist you are lol. Smoke a joint man. just some old treks.
    2013 StumpJumper FSR Comp 29er
    2011 Trek Sawyer 29er
    2000 Bianchi b.u.S.S.
    1999 Trek 930
    1997 Trek 850

  16. #216
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    Re: Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............

    You do know every alloy bike ever, has been welded by the tig process right?

    Sent from my LG-P769 using Tapatalk 2

  17. #217
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    Signing up for this train wreck

  18. #218
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    Quote Originally Posted by digitalayon View Post
    There are fanboys on here that will not ride their bikes to preserve them like it is some kind of classic car.
    Just pointing out this quote so that it doesn't get lost.


    Why would you own 100 Yugos when you could own 1 Porsche? - Rumpfy



  19. #219
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kevin_Federline View Post
    You do know every alloy bike ever, has been welded by the tig process right?

    Sent from my LG-P769 using Tapatalk 2
    Process is not the same as technique used previously. Steel frames with Trek were done by hand until 1999.

  20. #220
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    Re: Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............

    Still the same.

    Sent from my LG-P769 using Tapatalk 2

  21. #221
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    Sounds like elitist fanboy talk to me.

  22. #222
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    Quote Originally Posted by chefmiguel View Post
    Sounds like elitist fanboy talk to me.

    LOL....Call it fanboy of "VALUE"!!! I think the same today as I did back then when these bikes were made. Hell, I could not even afford one of these mid range Trek bikes even back then. I pumped gas for a spring and summer in 1992 just to barely afford my Haro Escape. But man the trails were fun back then.....less people riding!!! However I did like the old bonded Aluminum frame lugged frames Trek was dabbling into at the time in terms of how light they were. But when I rode a few I thought they were garbage on how they felt. My body told that to me. Could have been something different for others though. Everyone is different.

  23. #223
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    Quote Originally Posted by digitalayon View Post
    I pumped gas for a spring and summer in 1992 just to barely afford my Haro Escape.
    Sucked in some fumes, huh?

    We had self serve by the mid-80s. But you know, we also had the metric system officially since 1970.

    Quote Originally Posted by digitalayon View Post
    But man the trails were fun back then.....less people riding!!!
    Nah, less people ride now. Apparently they just talk crap on forums.

    Quote Originally Posted by digitalayon View Post
    Could have been something different for others though. Everyone is different.
    Amen to that

    Grumps

  24. #224
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    Some great bikes in this thread. Here's mine, got it for my 16th birthday. It still makes me smile at least once a week, and gets me to work pretty often. Wonder how many of the cars other kids got do that

    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-10456796306_9a41879c4f_b.jpg
    Yeah I only carry cans cause I'm a weight weenie.

  25. #225
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    [QUOTE=blak_byke;7707236]Why don't they have a cool factor to them? I mean they are good ol' American made True Temper steel frames right? They offer a great ride, hard to kill, and spec'd nicely for their time. Is it more or less because they come from a large manufacturer and not a boutique builder? I mean I know the welds look like crap but I can't see them when I ride so that doesn't bother me.






    I don't see a lot of them pop up here either restored or modernized so I was just curious.

  26. #226
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    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-trek-990-1.jpg
    Here's my 1989.5 990. I say that because the frame is painted in the '89 color scheme but the component spec is not SunTour but rather, all XT as was spec in 1990.
    I like it just fine.

  27. #227
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    I'm new here. I have been lurking around for a while checking things out. I've just started mountain biking after a lot of years on the road so I don't know better. I'm also 61.

    A neighbor gave me an old GT (non-butted) with a Mag21 but I recently picked up a very lightly used 970 frame that I have decided to build up.

    I like the ride of the old steel GT and hope the Trek rides as well if not better. I picked up a 80mm Marzocchi Bomber fork and a bunch of parts pretty cheap. I'll probably start putting everything together in a couple weeks.

    John

  28. #228
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    Quote Originally Posted by 70sSanO View Post
    II'm also 61.
    Congrats! That's super awesome and impressive.

  29. #229
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    '95 930

    STX,Alivio,Judy XC
    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-5-28-12-ride-top-010.jpg
    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-006.jpg

  30. #230
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    Here's my 1990 930 I decided to pull out of hibernation yesterday. I put a huge set of 2.30 Tioga's on it. I'm thinking they are gonna be to big for the rear. We'll see.


  31. #231
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    Reserved for pics of my '96 990 rebuild...
    - Chris
    '96 Trek 990 SHX / '08 Gunnar Crosshairs

  32. #232
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    Smile

    OH WOW!!

    This thing is still going! I'll reserve space for my 970 rebuild
    "Just remember, all bikes have front suspension once you put your hands on the handlebars!" - 1SPD

  33. #233
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    I'm running a 970 with a Marzocchi 80mm Bomber and it is a great combination.

    John

  34. #234
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    Quote Originally Posted by Drummerboy1975 View Post
    Here's my 1990 930 I decided to pull out of hibernation yesterday. I put a huge set of 2.30 Tioga's on it. I'm thinking they are gonna be to big for the rear. We'll see.

    I've got that same bike, a 1990 930 that I use as my commuter. I'll post a pic of it soon.

  35. #235
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    Well hell...since I started this thread....

    970 pavement pounder...

    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-rsz_dsc00153.jpg

    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-rsz_dsc00149.jpg

    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-rsz_dsc00150.jpg
    "Just remember, all bikes have front suspension once you put your hands on the handlebars!" - 1SPD

  36. #236
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    Well, I'm still in love with those old steel bikes. My first MTB was a 920 in the nice forrest green color. Years ago. Sold it last year. By that time I was already riding a smaller one, same model, in purple. Replaced several components to keep it in shape and every weekend it is going out for a ride. There are situations that I do miss front suspension but 95% of the time it is just fine. Had a modern Canondale with all new stuff but did not like it at all. The old steel fits me better since it steers much more direct. Climbs without loosing energy. Just bought another 920 wich is triple butted. Good shape but I doubt if the Taiwan frame is better than my older double butted one. Will see if I can post a nice picture of my current bikes.

  37. #237
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    This my latest 920. Just finished cleansing. Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-image.jpg

  38. #238
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    "Just remember, all bikes have front suspension once you put your hands on the handlebars!" - 1SPD

  39. #239
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    I picked up a used 990 frame for $50. Seems to be fine except i see rusty brown surface inside the tube. Is this okay?
    I am also thinking about buying another used bike with xt components for $300 and strip the parts and rebuild the 990. Do you think it's worth it?

  40. #240
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christov View Post
    I picked up a used 990 frame for $50. Seems to be fine except i see rusty brown surface inside the tube. Is this okay?
    I am also thinking about buying another used bike with xt components for $300 and strip the parts and rebuild the 990. Do you think it's worth it?
    $350 for an xt bike is not a bad deal. Just make sure you won't have to replace rings, cassettes, chain, rims, tires, brake pads or those 350 will grow into 1000 bucks really easy.
    WTB: Bomber Z2 1 1/8 steerer, in good to excellent shape OR bomber rebuild kit.

  41. #241
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    I've had the bike since I was 16, maybe outgrown it a little. The drop bars seem to have opened up the cockpit just enough.

    IMG_20150115_074731178_HDR.jpg
    Yeah I only carry cans cause I'm a weight weenie.

  42. #242
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    bumping an old thread. OG 26+

    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-p1080864-1024x575-.jpg
    ptarmigan hardcore

  43. #243
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    Quote Originally Posted by Co-opski View Post
    bumping an old thread. OG 26+
    What tires are those?
    Yeah I only carry cans cause I'm a weight weenie.

  44. #244
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    not a true 26+ but they are Nokian Hakkapeliitta 296 studded sized 2.1 on 44mm wide snowcats from All Weather Sports in Fairbanks befor 616 fab started making them. The Nokian 336 Freddiez Revenz 2.3 only worked on skinny rims and rubbed when I put the snowcats on. The 2.3s fit on snowcat wheels on my Gary Fisher HKEK.
    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-winter-2014-2-small.jpg
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  45. #245
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    Cool thanks, always wondered just how much tire I could fit in the back of mine and you seep to be as close to the limit as anyone I've seen
    Yeah I only carry cans cause I'm a weight weenie.

  46. #246
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlexCuse View Post
    Cool thanks, always wondered just how much tire I could fit in the back of mine and you seep to be as close to the limit as anyone I've seen
    I have some pretty big 2.5" tires I run on my 1991 970 in the winter on some i22 rims. Big tires that run just about 27.3" in diameter. Not much room to left on in fork arch, but still have room in the rear.

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    Get out of the gutter and onto the mountain top.

  47. #247
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    My 1994 930SHX.
    Ice Red, swapped the Quadra for a Mag21, and swapped on Bontrager Select wheels after I wore the first set out.
    I had totaled my first bike, (Lotus from Sears-fell down a canon), and experienced my first 'how much for a bike!?' I was in college, but made it happen, and have never looked back. It was worth it!
    I put that bike through a lot, and still have it.
    Nowadays, I ride it as more of a path bike, it's comfy, and do my trail work on a 2013 EX8.
    Sometimes I put them side by side and just ponder all the differences.


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  48. #248
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    Hmm. Inexpensive US-built lugged construction, durable and by most accounts a nice ride. I sorta want one now.

    Agree with the posts about dream bikes from younger days being affordable now, for the most part. I got into bikes in 93/94, and my grail would be a Ti Mojo. I've got two steel mojos now. They're very nice and the Ti is still too expensive. Maybe someday.
    'Tis better to bail and not to hurt, than not to bail and eat much dirt!
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  49. #249
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    I built up a ton of these when I worked in shops, even owned a 950 for a short while in the early 90s (Trek employee discount). I always thought they were the best bang for the buck out there. But the thing that killed them for me was the geometry was just so "meh" and the handling so sluggish compared to something like the Bonty Race I replaced it with. But they would still make for a great Craigslist score for a cheap beater.

  50. #250
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    Quote Originally Posted by Woodpuppy View Post
    Hmm. Inexpensive US-built lugged construction, durable and by most accounts a nice ride. I sorta want one now.

    Agree with the posts about dream bikes from younger days being affordable now, for the most part. I got into bikes in 93/94, and my grail would be a Ti Mojo. I've got two steel mojos now. They're very nice and the Ti is still too expensive. Maybe someday.
    The steel mojos are even better than the Titanium frames.
    WTB: Bomber Z2 1 1/8 steerer, in good to excellent shape OR bomber rebuild kit.

  51. #251
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    Quote Originally Posted by singletrackmack View Post
    I have some pretty big 2.5" tires I run on my 1991 970 in the winter on some i22 rims. Big tires that run just about 27.3" in diameter. Not much room to left on in fork arch, but still have room in the rear.

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    What tires are those? Would you mind posting some pictures of the rear triangle to show the clearance?

  52. #252
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    Quote Originally Posted by Henry Chinaski View Post
    ...But the thing that killed them for me was the geometry was just so "meh" and the handling so sluggish compared to something like the Bonty Race I replaced it with....
    Never heard someone describe the geometry of a 90's bike designed for aggressive riding as "meh" or "so sluggish". The trek singletracks geo is just about identical to the Fat Chance Yo Eddy and other MTBs from that era built for aggressive trail riding. The singletrack had the exact same chainstay length, top tube, Bb height, head angle, rake and wheel base as the Yo Eddy. This geo, the lugged true temper framer made in the US, ability to run large tires and price is why I bought one back in the early 90's. No way I could afford a Yo Eddy working min wage jobs while in high school.

    Comparing the bonty race to a bike with geo like the singletrack or Yo Eddy is kind of an apple to oranges comparison since they were designed for different types of riding. Treks more XC oriented line (6500 to 8000 models) would be better to compare the bonty race to. The trek 6500 to 8000 models used pretty much the exact same xc geo as the bonty race with the same chain stay, wheel base, head angle, top tube and BB.

    Quote Originally Posted by molf View Post
    What tires are those? Would you mind posting some pictures of the rear triangle to show the clearance?
    I am running some ITS (intense tyre systems) Edge 2.5" wide tires, but I think company went under a year or two ago. However, these are huge tires and run about 2.6" in width knob to knob so pretty much any 2.5" tire will fit. Here is a pic and as you can see there is plenty of room for 2.5" wide tires.

    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-image.jpg

    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-image.jpg
    Get out of the gutter and onto the mountain top.

  53. #253
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    Quote Originally Posted by singletrackmack View Post
    Never heard someone describe the geometry of a 90's bike designed for aggressive riding as "meh" or "so sluggish". The trek singletracks geo is just about identical to the Fat Chance Yo Eddy and other MTBs from that era built for aggressive trail riding. The singletrack had the exact same chainstay length, top tube, Bb height, head angle, rake and wheel base as the Yo Eddy. This geo, the lugged true temper framer made in the US, ability to run large tires and price is why I bought one back in the early 90's. No way I could afford a Yo Eddy working min wage jobs while in high school.

    Comparing the bonty race to a bike with geo like the singletrack or Yo Eddy is kind of an apple to oranges comparison since they were designed for different types of riding. Treks more XC oriented line (6500 to 8000 models) would be better to compare the bonty race to. The trek 6500 to 8000 models used pretty much the exact same xc geo as the bonty race with the same chain stay, wheel base, head angle, top tube and BB.



    I am running some ITS (intense tyre systems) Edge 2.5" wide tires, but I think company went under a year or two ago. However, these are huge tires and run about 2.6" in width knob to knob so pretty much any 2.5" tire will fit. Here is a pic and as you can see there is plenty of room for 2.5" wide tires.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Everything you said geometry wise is plain wrong. Your mix of Yo Eddy, Bontrager and Trek series is a joke. I won't even bother bringing the details but I admire your self assurance while distilling so much nonsense. Did you have special training? Are you a politician?
    btw.. i had a trek 8700 and it rode like crap.
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  54. #254
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    Quote Originally Posted by colker1 View Post
    Everything you said geometry wise is plain wrong. Your mix of Yo Eddy, Bontrager and Trek series is a joke. I won't even bother bringing the details but I admire your self assurance while distilling so much nonsense. Did you have special training? Are you a politician?
    btw.. i had a trek 8700 and it rode like crap.
    No special training, but I used to drool over the team yo Eddy and remember looking over different bikes geo and the singletrack being very close to the yo Eddy and I could afford it.

    Since this is a mid to late 90's trek singletrack thread let's look at the '95 team yo Eddy and '95 trek singletrack geo.

    1995 Yo Eddy Team Fat Chance size L:
    HA: 71 degrees
    Chain stay: 16.9"
    Top tube: 23.6"
    Wheel base: 42"
    Rake: 1.5"
    SA: 72 degrees

    1995 trek singletrack size L:
    HA: 71 degrees
    Chain stay: 16.9"
    Top Tube: 23.6"
    Wheel base: 42.4"
    Rake: 1.5"
    SA: 73 degrees

    There were slight differences in things like top tube length, rake and wheel base over the years, but for the most part as I remember the geo was very close.

    1996 trek 8000 series 19.5"
    HA: 71 degrease
    Chain stay: 16.7"
    BB: 11.7"
    Wheel base: 41.9"
    Top tube: 23.4"
    Rake: 1.5"

    1996 Bonty Race 19"
    HA: 71 degrease
    Chain stay: 16.74"
    BB: 11.75"
    Wheel base: 42"
    Top tube: 23.4"
    Rake: 1.25"

    Other than the rake, that's pretty darn close.
    Last edited by singletrackmack; 07-03-2015 at 12:45 AM. Reason: Spelling and SA
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    I am relatively new to mountain biking, roadie in the 80's/90's, but I have a Trek 970 and a Serotta T-Max. In comparison to the Serotta, the Trek steering is kinda slow and some may call it meh. But the Trek is still a much better overall bike and is what I'll ride for where the conditions are more demanding, at least for me and not necessarily for the rest of the world. That said, the Serotta will definitely out perform the Trek and is a blast to ride.

    I've never ridden a Bontrager race, but I can understand why the Bontrager, which is a pretty legendary frame, will outperfrom a Trek 970. I can't say how well the Bontrager compares to the Serotta in terms of all out performance in the hands to someone who can take both bikes to their limit. I think at the end of the day, the Bontrager would be preferred over the crit mountain bike.

    As for the 8700, I think that was one of those glued carbon fiber to aluminum lug frames. I never felt that the glued together frames were very good road bikes so I would think the mountain version would be even worse.

    John

    Edit added: I will say that at least the Trek doesn't have that a headtube that will only accomodate a 1" steerer. Except I thought Trek built some Bontragers in the late 90's with 1-1/8" but I guess kind of brings this whole discussion full circle.
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  56. #256
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    I've never ridden a Bontrager but i 've had Trek and Fat Chance among others. They ride VERY different from each other. I assume a Bontrager w/ a short rake fork, steep seat angle, short diameter tubes, low bb, short wheelbase.. will also ride very different but that's me. I know guys who love Bontrager handling and others who stay away. Maybe there is even that rider who feels anything w/ fat tires will ride the same but i have not met tht guy yet.
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    I would add there is not much comparison between the lugged steel Treks (900 series) of the early 90s and the bonded aluminum models (7000,8000) of the same era. Those bonded bikes were turds.
    A wise man once said: "Always Ride"

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    My buddies dad had one of the early 90's trek singletracks and I remember it had the same geo as my late 80's stumpy, but rode so much better. Though I would never admit that back then. It was lugged, but I think it was the larger diameter tubbing with thinner walls that made the ride so nice. Both bikes had identical HA, SA, chain stay, BB and rake. I always liked the way my stumpy handled and the trek handled the same, but the feel of that trek was so nice.

    Quote Originally Posted by colker1 View Post
    Everything you said geometry wise is plain wrong. Your mix of Yo Eddy, Bontrager and Trek series is a joke. I won't even bother bringing the details but I admire your self assurance while distilling so much nonsense. Did you have special training? Are you a politician?
    btw.. i had a trek 8700 and it rode like crap.
    I am a little confused by this because the geo of the 4 bikes he posted seem to support what he's talking about. Also, what's up with accusing him of being a politician and then not being able to be bothered to bring the details? Making claims without any details sounds a lot more like a politician to me.

  59. #259
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    Quote Originally Posted by tahoebeau View Post
    I am a little confused by this because the geo of the 4 bikes he posted seem to support what he's talking about. Also, what's up with accusing him of being a politician and then not being able to be bothered to bring the details? Making claims without any details sounds a lot more like a politician to me.
    I didn't "accuse" anyone.. It was a joke. You may believe you know how a bike rides by reading a geometry table but you don't know.Have you riden a Yo Eddy or a BOntrager? So how can you say they ride the same as a TRek 950? Just because you liked it? Henry Chinaski rode those bikes and said how he felt about them. Then someone decides he can't say it because geometry numbers tell it otherwise.. So i can also decide you are all politicians, ok?
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    Quote Originally Posted by colker1 View Post
    I didn't "accuse" anyone.. It was a joke. You may believe you know how a bike rides by reading a geometry table but you don't know.Have you riden a Yo Eddy or a BOntrager? So how can you say they ride the same as a TRek 950? Just because you liked it? Henry Chinaski rode those bikes and said how he felt about them. Then someone decides he can't say it because geometry numbers tell it otherwise.. So i can also decide you are all politicians, ok?
    I get what your saying and I don't doubt that you carbon bonded trek 8700 rode like a turd. But you said everything he "said geometry wise is plain wrong", didn't bother to give details and then asked if he was a politician. The politician thing was a joke, all good. But what he said about the geometry seemed to be right on. He was pointing out the geo differences/similarities in the first place in reference to someone saying the bike's steering was meh or sluggish, which is directly related to geometry. A yo Eddy's steering will feel more sluggish than a bontrager race because the geo is different, not because one is better than the other or one has a better ride.

    I have ridden a bontrager race and the steering was quicker than my old stumpy which is great at lower speeds on tight trails, tricky climbs and xc type riding and not so great for high speed riding on rough singletrack or going down hill. Not better or worse, just different.
    Last edited by tahoebeau; 07-04-2015 at 10:23 PM.

  61. #261
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    Quote Originally Posted by tahoebeau View Post
    I get what your saying and I don't doubt that you carbon bonded trek 8700 rode like a turd. But you said everything he "said geometry wise is plain wrong", didn't bother to give details and then asked if he was a politician. The politician thing was a joke, all good. But what he said about the geometry seemed to be right on. He was pointing out the geo differences/similarities in the first place in reference to someone saying the bike's steering was meh or sluggish, which is directly related to geometry. A yo Eddy's steering will feel more sluggish than a bontrager race because the geo is different, not because one is better than the other or one has a better ride.

    I have ridden a bontrager race and the steering was quicker than my old stumpy which is great at lower speeds on tight trails, tricky climbs and xc type riding and not so great for high speed riding on rough singletrack or going down hill. Not better or worse, just different.
    Yeah.. not better but different.
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    Hey, can anyone tell me what the a axle-to-crown measurement of the stock rigid fork on a 1996 trek 970 is?

  63. #263
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    Quote Originally Posted by PhilGau View Post
    Hey, can anyone tell me what the a axle-to-crown measurement of the stock rigid fork on a 1996 trek 970 is?
    Should be about 408mm I think. Take a look at the bottom left of page 4 in this link where it talks about "suspension ready geometry" http://www.vintage-trek.com/Trek-Fis...manualTrek.pdf

    It says the 1996 930 series and up was designed for a axle to crown length of 408mm to 430mm.
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    Quote Originally Posted by singletrackmack View Post
    Should be about 408mm I think. Take a look at the bottom left of page 4 in this link where it talks about "suspension ready geometry" http://www.vintage-trek.com/Trek-Fis...manualTrek.pdf

    It says the 1996 930 series and up was designed for a axle to crown length of 408mm to 430mm.
    Great info Thanks!

    I'm planning to replace the stock quadra 21r with a rigid Surly 1x1 80mm corrected fork. That's an axle-to-crown of 413mm.

  65. #265
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    Scored a 1992 950 on CR for $10.

  66. #266
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    Just finished this little 930, not sure of the year... maybe 93'?

    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-dscn2170.jpg
    Made in the U.S.A.
    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-dscn2174.jpg
    Urbanized.

  67. #267
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    ^ nice singletrack! Looks clean and the lugs on those late 80's / early 90's treks are really nice. I see you got the townie thing going on, but it would look a lot better with some proper mtb tires though.

    Quote Originally Posted by fattybikejones View Post
    To ride a 900 series TT OX framed Trek from the early/mid 90s is to love one.
    And that is why I have been looking for one in my size for a while now. I would like a 970 or 990, but they are surprisingly hard to find.




    Quote Originally Posted by fattybikejones View Post
    The 800 series from that era used pretty much off the shelf straight gauge Hi Ten and cro mo mix frame sets, if I'm not mistaken.
    Quote Originally Posted by unicrown junkie View Post
    I don't remember any of the 800 series having lugs. Maybe the pre-89 models, but that is a guess.
    As the poster before mentioned, they were constructed of cro-moly, and in the case of the 800 and 820, I think those were a mix of cro-moly and hi-tensile steel.

    Actually, from my experiences riding the 830 and 850s, they didn't ride that bad. In the case of the lugged 930s, 950s, 970s, and 990s, I think they ride like bricks. I suspect its the True Temper tubing from that time frame. Take my '86 Stumpie Sport, it's lugged, but has way more compliance and a smoother ride quality than any of the post '89 steel Treks ever had. Apart from that, the build quality was impeccable on the Trek line made in Waterloo, so they had Special Ed really beat there.

    I still would love to have a black 930 or white '89 950 for a town/XC mess around bike.
    I remember the 800 series frames being on the same level as a rockhopper or stumpjumper which is why unicorn junkie may have liked their ride since it he likes the compliant ride of his 86 stumpy. The team stumpjumper frame was more on the level of the 900 series treks, but not lugged and I am guessing made in Taiwan, but not sure. I didn't have a team stumpy, but the quality of my stumpy frame was not even close to that of the American made lugged single tracks. It made my stumpy look like a low end frame with nice components. As for the ride quality, that is a lot of personal preference and has a lot to do with where and how you ride.

    I see some describe the singletrack to ride like a brick. For me I would describe the singletrack frame as "lively" and "responsive" when pushing the bike hard and bikes they might call compliant like my stumpy I would describe as "noodly"" and "dull" when riding hard or on rough trails like here in Tahoe.

    I can say for me the singletrack was on a completely higher level when it came to liveliness and quality when compared to my stumpy.

  68. #268
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    1990 Trek 970 Single Track

    Here is a 22" frame 1990 Trek 970 Single Track:

    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-1990_trek_970_single_track.jpg

    I admire the sturdy construction of the frame and the reliability of the vintage components. With the exception of the thumb shifters, everything is easy to overhaul and maintain.

    I was seeking a durable, large-frame commuter bike that would not be ruined by pot holes or feel unstable on roads covered in sand and gravel.

    The ride is steady and smooth. The bike is perfectly suited to my needs.

  69. #269
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    ^nice pic up. And yes, that is a very well built and durable bike. I have a 1990 930 (same frame as your 970) and a 1991 970. They are some of my favorite bikes to ride. I really like the singletracks from '89 to '93 as those were built with those really nice lugs 

    Edit: I forgot to add (since your concerned with pot holes) that those years is when trek had a lot of the matrix house brand components. Those early 90's matrix wheels are really nice. Extremely strong and the ones from 1990 have a nice wide internal width of 20mm or 21mm. Significantly better in durability and performance than the skinny rims with road wheel widths that were the unfortunate fad in mtbing for the next 2 decades to follow.
    Last edited by singletrackmack; 09-18-2016 at 09:57 AM.
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  70. #270
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    anyone running 100mm forks on their 930's?

    thinking about upgrading mine






  71. #271
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    Also, what is the BCD of these STX-RC cranks?

  72. #272
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    Quote Originally Posted by CBR_TOY View Post
    Also, what is the BCD of these STX-RC cranks?
    Sheldon Brown's Bicycle Crank/Chainring Bolt Circle Diameter Crib Sheet
    This should help.
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  73. #273
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    Trek 930 dusted off SS conversion

    Finally built up one of my orig steel rides, '93 into an SS, for local training, street and fireroads. Simple but smooth with v-brakes and Fat Franks running low pressures, 15 to 18 lbs. I'm about 150.



    Last edited by aohammer; 11-28-2016 at 11:12 AM.

  74. #274
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    Nice. Very tasteful color combo.

  75. #275
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    Thanks! I wanted the controls area and drivetrain to be black to offset the silver wheels. Of course the tan and green for the rest of the theme. Those tires are my 'suspension'

  76. #276
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    Awesome thread and great pics.

    I just won a local auction for $20, and now own a 1990ish intense blue 950. Still haven't seen it in person but the pictures suggest its a very dusty but in good shape bike. Hopefully I'll be posting pictures of it once I get it cleaned up. I'm still not sure how rideable it will be for me either; I currently ride a 1990ish 19.5" Trek 820 that I never realized was "way too big" for me since I'm only 5' 7" with a 29-30" inseam. I know the 950 is smaller, and it might even be a 16.5. But at $20 I couldn't resist.

  77. #277
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldBlue950 View Post
    Awesome thread and great pics.
    +1

    Thanks to all who take the time to post in here.

  78. #278
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    I put a few more purple parts on mine. Purple nips, sealed jockey wheels, skewer set, cable crimps, pads, pedals, and 680mmx25.4mm riser bars.




  79. #279
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    Nips and silver big ring aren't pictured. Damn rain is keeping me indoors and stir crazy.

  80. #280
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    Quote Originally Posted by CBR_TOY View Post
    Nips and silver big ring aren't pictured. Damn rain is keeping me indoors and stir crazy.
    Trade you some rain for some snow and temps in the teens...

    That's a beautiful purply ride, nips or not!

    I will pick up my new-to-me 25 year old 950 on Friday. I'm going to want to put a suspension fork on either it or my same-age 820. What do I need to know before shopping for a fork? Being incredibly poor, I will probably try to find an old or used fork because I know I can't afford a new good one.

  81. #281
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    from what I hear don't go over 80mm of travel. My forks are the original units with 63mm of travel. The elastomer stack is still in great condition so I haven't upgraded yet. One day I might try for a set of 80mm forks or just buy stiffer elastomers for this setup.

    Can't wait to see your 950!

  82. #282
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    I am running an older 80mm Marzocchi Bomber oil bath fork on my '95 970. It is a 2001 fork and it works fine, and pretty bulletproof.

    John
    1995 Trek 970 - 80mm Atom Race
    1992 Serotta T-Max - 70mm Z3 Light
    1993 GT All Terra - 46mm Mag 21
    (STOLEN)

  83. #283
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    Got my 950 down from the ceiling this weekend and remembered I had done a bunch of stuff to make it ridable: ugly steerer riser thing, newesh wide handlebars, one chainring becuase old deore dx shifters were fubar'd and couldn't get stripped crankarm off. Rapid rise (GAH!) xt derailleur.

    Now I'm considering finding a donor/parts to make it more original again.

  84. #284
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    I built my 95 970 as a 2x7. I run 24/34 chainrings and the 7 speed cassette is spaced for 8. I don't get any cross-chaining so I get all 14 speeds. For me it is the perfect setup. I run the 24 for situations with climbing or a lot of ups and downs. The 34 is for mostly flat or downhill runs.

    As for rapid rise, I setup my wife's bike so it would be the same shifting on right and left. I really liked the triggering to drop to easier gears and thumbing up to go faster, so I set my bikes up that way. With my 2x, I am running a Suntour thumb shifter for the chainrings. My derailleurs of choice are the XTR 960 or the XT 760.

    John
    1995 Trek 970 - 80mm Atom Race
    1992 Serotta T-Max - 70mm Z3 Light
    1993 GT All Terra - 46mm Mag 21
    (STOLEN)

  85. #285
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    Well I picked up my new blue baby yesterday. Serial # indicates its a 1989. Still remains to be seen if I got a great bike or a money sink. But overall impression was its not bad for $30 including tax and shipping.

    The tires are toast but I knew that. I think the mountain LX thumb shifters can be salvaged (though I'm not sure I will like them...). They were quite stuck but some WD-40 is starting to loosen them up a bit. They may need to be disassembled for a real cleaning. The cables are clean and free and derailleurs seem clean, straight and free to my amateur eye. The rims, hubs, headset, BB parts all seem snug quiet and in good shape. The frame is fine, some paint scratches but that's expected. A bit heavier than I expected. The seatpost moves, lol.

    The cassette definitely has some uneven wear so that and chain may need to be replaced. But I have only ridden it around the living room so far so I don't really know. The seat indicates it belonged to a woman, so this marks the closest my crotch has come to a woman's in an awfully long time. I hope this means my luck is about to change. The intense blue with dainty pinky borders is also slightly feminine, but I like it! I'm not afraid to show my slightly feminine side.

    Overall I'd give it and 8.0 out of 10 for $30, and will begin to see if I can bump it up to a 9 or better without spending too much. Pictures once I get some work done on it.

  86. #286
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    Need pics!

    Also be easy with that WD40 - it's a solvent and not really a lube. Get some triflow or something. Be very careful if you choose to take them apart - It's been years since I worked on one but if I recall they tend to go !SPROING! once opened and good luck getting them back together.

  87. #287
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    Yea I'm only using WD40 to test the theory that the shifters are sticky, its not a long term solution.

    Forgot to mention the best thing: it an 18" and it fits! In fact It may be the first MB that is the proper size for me in the 21 years I've ridden MBs. I'm only 5 7 but mostly leg, and bigger bikes always felt better when I was younger. Now they feel big, especially off road.

  88. #288
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    Let's see more pics of your rides.....

    Just tooled around on my Fat Franks 2.35 with not-so-thin tubes at low 15-17 lbs, nice cushy suspension, my gravel SS bike now




  89. #289
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    Love seeing all these old, great Singletracks! There sure are a lot of the early 90's lugged beauties showing up on this thread so here is another one.

    Picked this one up over the summer and is pretty much all original except for a replacement non-drive side crank arm that you can't see in this pic. Being a 1990 this bike has the thinner diameter tubing than the newer years. I couldn't pass this up, especially with the blacked out components. Just needs a black seat post

    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-trek-930.jpg
    Get out of the gutter and onto the mountain top.

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    Went for a ride today







    Merry Christmas


  91. #291
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    Quote Originally Posted by singletrackmack View Post
    Love seeing all these old, great Singletracks! There sure are a lot of the early 90's lugged beauties showing up on this thread so here is another one.

    Picked this one up over the summer and is pretty much all original except for a replacement non-drive side crank arm that you can't see in this pic. Being a 1990 this bike has the thinner diameter tubing than the newer years. I couldn't pass this up, especially with the blacked out components. Just needs a black seat post

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I finally found the same exact 930 in my size (22"). I wanted this specific model because of the all Suntour components. I'll post some pics soon.

  92. #292
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    Quote Originally Posted by OldBlue950 View Post
    Awesome thread and great pics.

    I just won a local auction for $20, and now own a 1990ish intense blue 950. Still haven't seen it in person but the pictures suggest its a very dusty but in good shape bike. Hopefully I'll be posting pictures of it once I get it cleaned up. I'm still not sure how rideable it will be for me either; I currently ride a 1990ish 19.5" Trek 820 that I never realized was "way too big" for me since I'm only 5' 7" with a 29-30" inseam. I know the 950 is smaller, and it might even be a 16.5. But at $20 I couldn't resist.
    OK, here she finally is. Took it in to the shop and showed them the worn cassette, they measured the chain and replaced the dr cables and housing instead for $29. Took it back a week later and they got to replace the cassette for free, since they were wroing. Apparently someone replaced the chain in the past but not the cassette. I'm still having some minor skip problems but its on the road and riding well otherwise. Took it for a 45 minute ride today and it did fine. Took the tires off my Trek 820 thats too big for me anyway, bought it a 15 dollar Outerdo mountain bike seat (which is way more comfy than $15 suggests) and I now have a pretty decent $65 bike. Now I just need to get the 820 back on the road, although its too big for me I like it anyway.

    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-img_0324.jpg

  93. #293
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    looking good man. I want to see more Treks!!

  94. #294
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scoutergtg View Post
    I finally found the same exact 930 in my size (22"). I wanted this specific model because of the all Suntour components. I'll post some pics soon.
    I'm looking for one in 18". Was my first mtb

  95. #295
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    Hope Re:

    I have a 92" 9500 full suser which was always compared to a pogo stick. It's a quirky bike no doubt, but I like I from a sentimental perspective as it was the first purpose-built MTB I bought versus cobbling other components together from a hybrid perspective. I rode it a few times, mothballed it and bought myself a Zaskar. It may have 50 miles on and just sits in my basement for amusement. All original, bone stock (down to the tires and chain) and full M900. A waste...

    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-cbgy4y.jpg

    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-hunebx.jpg

    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-avqvj9.jpg

  96. #296
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    Super cool. I never rode one as my stint of working in bike shops ended right when that came out but in my mind it was the first full sus that was widely available (even though it's probably not). Looks like it is in really good shape.

  97. #297
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    Quote Originally Posted by smithjss View Post
    All original, bone stock (down to the tires and chain) and full M900. A waste...
    At least you have some value in those pristine looking xtr and answer bits. I remember drooling over one of these in my local shop. Pretty sure they came with Matrix tires, but your smokes look pretty mint too.

  98. #298
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    Quote Originally Posted by 92gli View Post
    At least you have some value in those pristine looking xtr and answer bits. I remember drooling over one of these in my local shop. Pretty sure they came with Matrix tires, but your smokes look pretty mint too.
    Definitely came with Matrix tires and I have them on hand but swapped them for the smoke/dart combo.

  99. #299
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    I've had this 990 Singletrack frame hanging in my garage for 25 years, and finally got the time to do a build on it.
    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-img_0817.jpg
    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-img_0824.jpg
    The frame was hanging in the back of Wheatridge Cyclery (Ron Kieffel's digs) and I picked it up for $100.

  100. #300
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    I wanted to upgrade it with disk brakes so I fabbed up a brazed/bolt on caliper mount for the rear, and burned off the old cantilever brake mounts.
    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-img_1036.jpg

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    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-img_1033.jpg
    I'm having problems uploading pictures, but this is the finished product.
    Disk brakes, 1st gen XTR crankset, 29'r conversion by removing the seat stay and chain stay bridges, Salsa fork, Biopace chainring. I had everything for this build just sitting around in my garage except for the Kenda Small Block 8 tires and the riser bar. I love that there are folks out there that appreciate these old Trek Singletrack bikes. I would like to think of this as sort of a restomod, combining old and new, for a one of a kind ride.

  102. #302
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    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-img_1042.jpg

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    Pretty cool, how's it ride with the seat stay and chain stay bridges removed?

  104. #304
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    I can't imagine those rack eyelets are strong enough to anchor a disc brake for very long but I am not an engineer. Removing both the seat and chainstay bridges is equally impressive.

    Please give us a ride report. Good on you for doing something outside the box.

  105. #305
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    Quote Originally Posted by daytonadogie View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Always interested to see something different.

    Looking forward to ride report.

    Hope you have small feet...looks like a bit of toe overlap.



    Steve

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    Wink

    [QUOTE=girlonbike;13023240]I can't imagine those rack eyelets are strong enough to anchor a disc brake for very long but I am not an engineer. Removing both the seat and chainstay bridges is equally impressive.

    The dropouts/eyelets are one piece forged steel beauties, so I'm not too worried about their strength. I was more worried about removing the bridges, but after some research, most custom frame builders leave them off unless they need a fender or brake mount (or kick stand :-)

    The toe overlap looks a lot worse in the photos than it really is. Shouldn't be a problem.

    Won't get too many miles on it till it warms up. Thats why i'm in the garage! Will post some ride impressions later.

    Thanks for the replies!

  107. #307
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    an 8000 with 700c

    she's my beater

    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-klunker5.jpg

  108. #308
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    Hi, can you please share details on the v-brake adapters you used? Best, Rich

  109. #309
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    sure....found'em on ebaytype v bake adapters

  110. #310
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    Thanks, easy enough....

  111. #311
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    Quote Originally Posted by daytonadogie View Post
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    That is a beautiful bike. I'm getting a 930 frame in 18" tonight - do you think the geometry is the same on both frames so I can do the same to mine? Have you ridden it yet? I'm wondering about long-term stability with the bridges removed.

  112. #312
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    My Wife is still running her 95 970, nothing left on its original, sram x0 1x9 with a 48 chainring, and road tyres. It's a little over 10kg and just spins along. You can ride this thing all day. It's fun to watch her go past youngsters on their road bikes. Still trying to convince her to let me have the frame stripped and resprayed

  113. #313
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    Its too quiet in here

    Did a few more upgrades to the 930


  114. #314
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    Quote Originally Posted by CBR_TOY View Post
    Its too quiet in here

    Did a few more upgrades to the 930
    You installed an analog speedometer?

    Oh no, sorry, that's Photobucket being an arse.

    Grumps

  115. #315
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    Hi guys,

    I built this 930 up recently to an SS cruiser, love that comfy lugged steel, Schwalbe Fat Franks, Azonic bar, Specialized Stout hub, Surly Singleator tensioner, Avid brakeset, etc.

    Thoughts? Upgrades?

    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-1993-trek-930.jpg
    Last edited by aohammer; 09-15-2018 at 07:43 AM.

  116. #316
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    what's everyone using for an up-loader these days

  117. #317
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    Quote Originally Posted by CBR_TOY View Post
    what's everyone using for an up-loader these days
    Just use the forum file uploader in the Advanced reply.

  118. #318
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    Quote Originally Posted by CBR_TOY View Post
    what's everyone using for an up-loader these days
    Postimage.org — free image hosting / image upload

  119. #319
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    Trying to get my 950 back up to moving after a newish 9 speed SLX shifter died. I'm not running the original wheelset as the axles were toast (I still have them though - DX hubs and matrix rims), but man even 9 speed gear is getting hard to find. I can't imagine how hard it is to keep a 7 speed drive train going. Going to go back to 3 rings up front too as I found the 1 ring to suck when trying to pull a kid trailer. Pics soon.

  120. #320
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    Quote Originally Posted by BStrummin View Post
    I can't imagine how hard it is to keep a 7 speed drive train going.
    Me, my wife, and my two kids all ride vintage MTBs with 3x7 Shimano drivetrains. I also have a '90s road bike with a 3x7 drivetrain.

    While you may not find them in stock at your LBS, 7-speed cassettes and chains aren't any more difficult to order than anything else at your favorite bicycle parts website.

    Here are twenty-nine different 7-speed cassettes at one site, for example:

    https://www.bikeparts.com/categories...=1&f%5B%5D=844

  121. #321
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    Figure this should be posted here.

    Early 90's Trek Singletrack action! Totally rad.

    Get out of the gutter and onto the mountain top.

  122. #322
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    That was thoroughly enjoyable! Brings back fond memories of college and cracked Cannondales. Id have better off if Id started on the Bridgestones or Treks.
    'Tis better to bail and not to hurt, than not to bail and eat much dirt!
    -unknown

  123. #323
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    It's BACK! The purpose here isn't any kind of restoration, but a usable steed made from parts I mostly had laying around, so sorry if that bothers any purists. As posted previously this was my first mtb and was bought new from Octopus Bicycles in Walnut Creek CA around '91 I think. It has seen lots of miles around the bay and in Chico during college. At one point one of the rear brake bosses was broken off due to very long mud ride down from the Mt. Diablo summit and the frame was sent back to Trek for repairs. I still have many of the original parts but they are toast - deore LX hubs laced to matrix rims with destroyed spindles, deore DX shifter combos that don't work at all, and the brakes too. I've tried several times to do something interesting with it over the last 10 years but it's never worked very well: single speed (dear god why - I drink way too much beer for that to ever be fun) and most recently a 1x9 due to lack of parts/lazyness. Current parts are no name wheels off a 2000 Trek 7500, new deore rear derailleur and shifters, old xt front derailleur. Still working on dialing the shifting in as the front derailleur seems like it is probably bent funny or something, or the newer rear hub is just wide enough that it fit but has screwed up the chainline. Its workable for now though.
    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-20171126_103941-medium-.jpgMid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-20171126_103827-medium-.jpgMid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-20171126_103907-medium-.jpg

  124. #324
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    Rode my 930SHX today. Over the years I have moved to FS, and rode the same park with my 930. I must have been an animal back in the day!
    It was an SHX, but I swapped out the fork for rigid, but I am looking for a Quadra 10 to make things right.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  125. #325
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    Trek 950

    This is my "shopping" bike, a trek 950 singletrack from early 90's I believe

    It's converted to a single speed to do some small trips here in Amsterdam.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-20171129_200833_hdr-custom-.jpg  

    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-20171116_145326_hdr-custom-.jpg  


  126. #326
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    Any more Trek updates? I recently installed a Pauls chain keeper that's not pictured.


    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-23619125_10214531980164346_945723818_n.jpgMid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-23627193_10214531980084344_1660259495_o.jpg

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  128. #328
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  129. #329
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    Just picked up a 1993 purple 930, after two years of searching. Do 27.5 wheels fit? If so, what's the widest tire size? Thanks!

  130. #330
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    ^I would think a 27.5x2.0 should easily fit in the rear. According to this bicycle tire diameter chart a 27.5x2.0 has about the same diameter of a 26x2.5.

    BikeCalc.com - How to calculate Bicycle Wheel Size

    There is a pic of my 91 970 showing how a high volume 26x2.5 fits in the rear on the previous page in this thread if you want to see. There is plenty of room between the tire and the seat/chain stay bridges so you may be able to squeeze a 27.5x2.2 in there. 91 frames should be very close to the 93.

    I am curious as to how you plan to handle the brakes for the new wheel size.

  131. #331
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    Quote Originally Posted by singletrackmack View Post
    ^

    I am curious as to how you plan to handle the brakes for the new wheel size.
    Brakes are the issue. Modern bikes can swap wheel sizes because they have disc brakes.


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  132. #332
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    Quote Originally Posted by singletrackmack View Post
    ^I would think a 27.5x2.0 should easily fit in the rear. According to this bicycle tire diameter chart a 27.5x2.0 has about the same diameter of a 26x2.5.

    BikeCalc.com - How to calculate Bicycle Wheel Size

    There is a pic of my 91 970 showing how a high volume 26x2.5 fits in the rear on the previous page in this thread if you want to see. There is plenty of room between the tire and the seat/chain stay bridges so you may be able to squeeze a 27.5x2.2 in there. 91 frames should be very close to the 93.

    I am curious as to how you plan to handle the brakes for the new wheel size.
    I knew I saw something like that before, I just couldn't find the post. Must of glossed over it. Not sure about the brakes yet, possibly a disc brake conversion of some kind. I am taking it one step at a time. Since this is a project bike patience will be key in all decisions.

  133. #333
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    ^ I saw this adapter in the Bontrager thread. Easy and cheap way to try out 27.5 wheels without having to make major modifications for disc brakes.

    https://www.brgstore.com/en/brake-ca...ators-box.html

    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-3b531eeb-2d14-4423-a063-a419053b2b91.jpg
    Get out of the gutter and onto the mountain top.

  134. #334
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    Quote Originally Posted by singletrackmack View Post
    ^ I saw this adapter in the Bontrager thread. Easy and cheap way to try out 27.5 wheels without having to make major modifications for disc brakes.

    https://www.brgstore.com/en/brake-ca...ators-box.html

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Good find! I will be checking this out if I decide to go the 27.5 route.

  135. #335
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    Quote Originally Posted by singletrackmack View Post
    ^ I saw this adapter in the Bontrager thread. Easy and cheap way to try out 27.5 wheels without having to make major modifications for disc brakes.

    https://www.brgstore.com/en/brake-ca...ators-box.html

    Click image for larger version. 

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    The problem with these brake adaptors is that they require your frame to have removable brake bosses in order to install them....Bonty's do but your frame does not. If you plan to go with cantilever brakes, I believe the Tektro CR720's and Shimano CX-70 have enough pad adjustment to cover the ~12-15mm difference in rim height. They will be at their max and pads 'may' contact the rim at a bit of an angle. There are various V-brake options out there...Paul's and FMX to start.

    Now...considering the fact that 650b/27.5 rim brake rims are a bit scarce these days and require a new wheel build (kinda makes it fun), consider staying @ 26" and using Compass Rat Trap Pass tires @ 26x2.3. They measure up just shy of a 650b x 47. They are a bit on the expensive site but still way less expensive than a 650b/27.5 conversion. The ride is pretty supple and you can go tubed or tubeless, black or tan wall, standard or extra light casings. I checked mine and these fit with ample clearance. The frame will even fit a Schwalbe Super Moto @ 26x2.35 but with a little less clearance.
    "Just remember, all bikes have front suspension once you put your hands on the handlebars!" - 1SPD

  136. #336
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    If you really want to do 650B another great choice are the old Cane Creek Direct Curve 5. I did a mid-90's slingshot a few years ago and was able to easily clear 27.5x2.3 Pacenti Neo-Motos.

    Untitled by Mr. P, on Flickr

    Untitled by Mr. P, on Flickr

    If you do end up going the route of linear pull brakes with the pads run WAY up high on the arms, match them with regular pull levers (I used Paul's in this case).

    Worked ace.

    Another tip: DON'T bother with cantilevers (below: same bike/wheels). The above setup with the linear pulls was SO SO much better.
    Untitled by Mr. P, on Flickr

  137. #337
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    I love my Singletrack 970 from 1996, this was on the day I bought it two years ago:

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    Hi blak_byke,

    New member here, looking at either doing a 650b conversion or staying 26" w/ the Compass RTP's on a '95 Trek 970. Are you running the RTP's on a 90's Trek? Would you mind giving me some pointers on minimum rim width? I have a nice set of Mavic 217's from that era. Also, do you think they would fit/clear on a stock rigid fork? My eyeballing w/ a set of calipers looks "close".

    By my calculation, these would measure up ~4-5mm less in diameter than a 650b with a 47 or 48mm tire.


    Thanks! Really looking forward to redoing the 970 into a sorta expedition/bikepacking go anywhere & everywhere bike.

  139. #339
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    Quote Originally Posted by deann View Post
    Hi blak_byke,

    New member here, looking at either doing a 650b conversion or staying 26" w/ the Compass RTP's on a '95 Trek 970. Are you running the RTP's on a 90's Trek? Would you mind giving me some pointers on minimum rim width? I have a nice set of Mavic 217's from that era. Also, do you think they would fit/clear on a stock rigid fork? My eyeballing w/ a set of calipers looks "close".

    By my calculation, these would measure up ~4-5mm less in diameter than a 650b with a 47 or 48mm tire.


    Thanks! Really looking forward to redoing the 970 into a sorta expedition/bikepacking go anywhere & everywhere bike.

    Deann,

    On my 970 I ran Schwalbe Super Motos which are 26x2.35...larger than the RTP's. Not sure what the rim width was but your 217's will work just fine for the RTP's on the 970 with room to spare. Keep in mind, the RTP's run wider when tubless than when running tubes. So with tubes the may end up more like a 2.2 than a 2.3. I'm going to mount my Rat Trap Pass on my 517's and set them in my 930 frame and I can take a pic of the clearance to show how much room you're working with.


    My old 970...

    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-rsz_dsc00153.jpg
    "Just remember, all bikes have front suspension once you put your hands on the handlebars!" - 1SPD

  140. #340
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    Thank you Sir. Well, it turns out I was at my LBS yesterday, saw they had the RTP's and decided to buy them and figure it out from there...

    They fit & look great on the stock rims, even on the stock fork. Ultimately, I want to go tubeless with them, so I have some work to do finding/building up a wheelset for such.


    Is that the Exotic CF fork on your bike? I have one on a Kestrel CSX, which this 970 build is replacing. I may switch it to the 970 as I like how it creates a more upright riding position & gives me some extra steerer tube to work with, as compared to the stock fork. I am a bit torn between the aesthetics of the stock fork vs. the function of the Exotic though.

    Here's my new project coming together, going to try out the swept back bars but will probably ultimately stick w/ the trekking bars I've grown accustomed to.

    Thanks again for the response and this thread gave me the encouragement to jump in headfirst on my build project!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-wp_20180808_14_11_23_pro.jpg  


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    Whoa! I dig it! That's coming along quite nicely! I have an older lugged 970 that I want to powder coat the same color with the more modern decals.

    Yes it is an exotic fork and it allowed me to accomplish everything you're looking to accomplish. Note...I did not start out with the factory fork so I was forced into a decision on what fork to buy. As much a I like the aesthetic of straight blade forks I say keep yours as is. I'm a lines guy all day long. The exotic will add black accents to a build that, in my eye, looks to leading towards more of a classic feel with the silver components. Again...that's just me because I'm more of a retro-mod guy.

    Glad any info I've provided was of help to you especially since I've gotten so much info from the forum. Keep us posted on your build!
    "Just remember, all bikes have front suspension once you put your hands on the handlebars!" - 1SPD

  142. #342
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    Quote Originally Posted by blak_byke View Post
    Whoa! I dig it! That's coming along quite nicely! I have an older lugged 970 that I want to powder coat the same color with the more modern decals.

    Yes it is an exotic fork and it allowed me to accomplish everything you're looking to accomplish. Note...I did not start out with the factory fork so I was forced into a decision on what fork to buy. As much a I like the aesthetic of straight blade forks I say keep yours as is. I'm a lines guy all day long. The exotic will add black accents to a build that, in my eye, looks to leading towards more of a classic feel with the silver components. Again...that's just me because I'm more of a retro-mod guy.

    Glad any info I've provided was of help to you especially since I've gotten so much info from the forum. Keep us posted on your build!
    Thanks! Yeah, the old form vs. function dilemma. The only "good" solution I've come up with so far in my head is to build two bikes....one w/ the aesthetics for the local 10-20 mile day rides and one for my loaded rail-trail rides up to 70 miles/day.

    Now to find a practical solution.... I've considered having the steerer tube extended with a brazed in sleeve/extension tube and using a Chris King headset w/ the high five, extended steerer race for a little front end lift. Also looking at couple of after market steel forks which I could possibly have color matched. But both of those are potential budget busters at this point.

    I will probably end up going to the exotic fork, ride comfort ultimately trumps looks. I'm sure I would have thought differently 20 years ago though.

  143. #343
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    Quote Originally Posted by deann View Post
    Thanks! Yeah, the old form vs. function dilemma. The only "good" solution I've come up with so far in my head is to build two bikes....one w/ the aesthetics for the local 10-20 mile day rides and one for my loaded rail-trail rides up to 70 miles/day.

    Now to find a practical solution.... I've considered having the steerer tube extended with a brazed in sleeve/extension tube and using a Chris King headset w/ the high five, extended steerer race for a little front end lift. Also looking at couple of after market steel forks which I could possibly have color matched. But both of those are potential budget busters at this point.

    I will probably end up going to the exotic fork, ride comfort ultimately trumps looks. I'm sure I would have thought differently 20 years ago though.
    I completely understand. Not sure what your fork budget is, but look at Soma and see if you can find a Salsa Comoto 26 with canti bosses and disc tabs. The Salsa is rare but worth looking for.

  144. #344
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    Has anyone tried a Maxxis Hookworm 26x2.5 or a Surly Extraterrestrial 26x2.5 on one of the 900 series Treks? I have a 950 that is ready for new tires. I like these tires but am doubtful they'll fit. Thanks.

  145. #345
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    I have 26x2.3 Schwalbe Big Apples on my wifes 930 and Im not sure theres room for much more. We may have briefly run hookworms on it to try - but if was a few years ago and I recall it being a bit sketchy.

  146. #346
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    Quote Originally Posted by 123wheels View Post
    Has anyone tried a Maxxis Hookworm 26x2.5 or a Surly Extraterrestrial 26x2.5 on one of the 900 series Treks? I have a 950 that is ready for new tires. I like these tires but am doubtful they'll fit. Thanks.
    What year singletrack do you have? I have a 90 and 91 and both fit beefy 2.5 wide knobbies in the rear with room left over. There is a pic of one of my bikes with these tires and the clearance on the previous page if you want to look. I doubt there would be any issues with fitting 2.5 hook worms on a 90 or 91, but not sure about other years.
    Get out of the gutter and onto the mountain top.

  147. #347
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    Quote Originally Posted by 123wheels View Post
    Has anyone tried a Maxxis Hookworm 26x2.5 or a Surly Extraterrestrial 26x2.5 on one of the 900 series Treks? I have a 950 that is ready for new tires. I like these tires but am doubtful they'll fit. Thanks.
    Finally finished building up my '95 970 with the Compass 2.3" tires & there is ~.25" of clearance on either side of the tire and the chain stays.

    I'm running these tubeless w/ Stans & they measure 52mm wide on the stock rims.

    These are the extralight version of the rat trap pass. I took the bike out for its maiden voyage this morning & did a quick 12 mile ride. Set the tires to 40 psi and it was very smooth, but I plan to try it at 35 psi to see how it feels there too.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-wp_20180825_13_19_44_pro.jpg  

    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-wp_20180825_13_20_18_pro.jpg  

    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-wp_20180825_13_20_03_pro.jpg  

    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-wp_20180825_13_21_10_pro.jpg  


  148. #348
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    Well alrighty then....very nice! I like more of a racy look (for myself) but you nailed this! Any plan for racks or panniers?

    1x10?
    "Just remember, all bikes have front suspension once you put your hands on the handlebars!" - 1SPD

  149. #349
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    Quote Originally Posted by blak_byke View Post
    Well alrighty then....very nice! I like more of a racy look (for myself) but you nailed this! Any plan for racks or panniers?

    1x10?
    Thanks!! Yes, 1x10. Rear rack & panniers eventually. I plan to ride the Katy trail (or possibly the GAP) next summer with this bike. Unless I find a rack that just looks killer on it, I will probably leave off until then. Not a fan of front racks personally, but that's just me.

    The handlebar (a custom, jerry-rigged setup w/ modified bar ends in the middle) gives me three unique hand/riding positions. Forward position feels almost like being on roadbike hoods, back position is relaxed, upright/cruiser position and the middle just feels perfect for long rides, although the angle does feel a little off.

  150. #350
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    [QUOTE=daytonadogie;13023994]
    Quote Originally Posted by girlonbike View Post
    I can't imagine those rack eyelets are strong enough to anchor a disc brake for very long but I am not an engineer. Removing both the seat and chainstay bridges is equally impressive.

    The dropouts/eyelets are one piece forged steel beauties, so I'm not too worried about their strength. I was more worried about removing the bridges, but after some research, most custom frame builders leave them off unless they need a fender or brake mount (or kick stand :-)

    The toe overlap looks a lot worse in the photos than it really is. Shouldn't be a problem.

    Won't get too many miles on it till it warms up. Thats why i'm in the garage! Will post some ride impressions later.

    Thanks for the replies!
    Ride report? I'm interested on how the stays hold up without those bridges and disc setup. Nice, interesting resto-mod setup.

  151. #351
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    Quote Originally Posted by Squeeze View Post
    Me, my wife, and my two kids all ride vintage MTBs with 3x7 Shimano drivetrains. I also have a '90s road bike with a 3x7 drivetrain.

    While you may not find them in stock at your LBS, 7-speed cassettes and chains aren't any more difficult to order than anything else at your favorite bicycle parts website.

    Here are twenty-nine different 7-speed cassettes at one site, for example:

    https://www.bikeparts.com/categories...=1&f%5B%5D=844
    This is exactly what we found... These sorts of bikes are dime-a-dozen almost everywhere you look: garage sales in expensive neighborhoods, thrift stores, end-of-year flea markets at colleges where rich kids ditch all the expensive gear their parents bought them. One we even got for free. A neighbor had put it out with his trash. A nice Trek 820. The only thing wrong with it was that the screw holding rear brake cable had come loose so there was no rear braking. All you have to be able to do is pick out which bikes are old, but good quality versus no-name trash. Not hard to do. Our family bikes are all Trek something-or-others acquired this way. I usually find some way of raising the handlebars for a more comfortable upright, cruiser position for family rides. On a couple of hard nose, quill stem Treks, I put on BMX bars. I also usually convert the 3x7's into 1x7's using the smallest front ring. That's all the top end gear you need for family rides, while preserving the all important climbing gear the wife and kids rely on. And I usually get around to installing v-brakes... All the cheap Treks I've come into have the mounts for them. I have an ever so slightly newer Trek ($40 at a yard sale) an alloy 6000 model. It has a Manitou fork with post mounts. I am converting it to disc. Just need to find a frame welder in the greater Denver area to weld on an IS tab for the rear.

    -Peter

  152. #352
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    My Trek Singletrack 930

    Отправлено с моего LLD-L31 через Tapatalk

  153. #353
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    Not a 7k series

    Quote Originally Posted by blak_byke View Post
    970 pavement pounder...

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I know this is an old thread, but after coming to the conlusion there needs to be a single speed urban assault bike in my stable... well... this post just solidified the dream! I just picked up a stiff pristine 92 Trek 7000 fully rigid with XT/LX/Matrix build that may be the ticket. Add a period Campy Ergo Power Shifter for 1x8 or SA3 speed rear hub?

    It's on!

    Just realized I posted this in the wrong thread.
    Last edited by caveman70; 09-30-2018 at 09:27 PM. Reason: Wrong forum

  154. #354
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    Quote Originally Posted by caveman70 View Post
    I know this is an old thread, but after coming to the conlusion there needs to be a single speed urban assault bike in my stable... well... this post just solidified the dream! I just picked up a stiff pristine 92 Trek 7000 fully rigid with XT/LX/Matrix build that may be the ticket. Add a period Campy Ergo Power Shifter for 1x8 or SA3 speed rear hub?

    It's on!

    Just realized I posted this in the wrong thread.


    Maaaan I miss that bike! I found a mint 930, green to purple fade, that is getting the same treatment.
    "Just remember, all bikes have front suspension once you put your hands on the handlebars!" - 1SPD

  155. #355
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    Quote Originally Posted by blak_byke View Post
    Maaaan I miss that bike! I found a mint 930, green to purple fade, that is getting the same treatment.
    What is a good inexpensive fork option for one of these old rigid frames. I like how yours has a forward swept crown that would be perfect for street.

  156. #356
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    Quote Originally Posted by caveman70 View Post
    What is a good inexpensive fork option for one of these old rigid frames. I like how yours has a forward swept crown that would be perfect for street.
    Gracias. That was an Exotic Carbon fork w/alu steerer. You really don't want anything longer than an AtoC of 425mm...MAX. 410mm may be optimal. Depending on the look / material / use / tire clearance / braking you desire, Exotic or Trigon's carbon offerings may be what you seek. I just happen to like the aesthetic straight forks. If you are patient, look for Salsa Cromoto 26 with V brake bosses and disc tabs. The disc only 26" fork is suspension correct for 100mm of travel. If you want period correct, your local co-op or LBS may have old 26" forks galore!


    Another cool option is a CX fork since they have almost the same A to C and a 90's MTB rigid fork...390-410mm. If you can run disc up front, a Tange / IRD / Soma straight blade CX fork will clears my 26x2.35 Schwalbe Super Moto. That tire measures 59mm wide!
    "Just remember, all bikes have front suspension once you put your hands on the handlebars!" - 1SPD

  157. #357
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    Trek 950 92'

    Hi all
    I saw on the internet someone put in modern suspension ahead fork in to his old trek 9xx. Anyone can tell me how is it possible? I think this frame has 1" headset.Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-img_1292.jpg
    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-2012_09_02-trek930-002-010.jpg
    Thank for your help!

    I bought black 92' 950 today in original condition and all original parts except the saddle, and now i planning to modernising with some parts.

  158. #358
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    Quote Originally Posted by airwin88 View Post
    Hi all
    I saw on the internet someone put in modern suspension ahead fork in to his old trek 9xx. Anyone can tell me how is it possible? I think this frame has 1" headset.Click image for larger version. 

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    Thank for your help!

    I bought black 92' 950 today in original condition and all original parts except the saddle, and now i planning to modernising with some parts.

    Head tube is 1 1/8" so a modern(ish) short travel (60-80mm) for would work. The bottom photo is by Peter Lombardi. He has a blog (blog.peterlombardi.com) and you can also check him out of IG. Very cool guy.
    "Just remember, all bikes have front suspension once you put your hands on the handlebars!" - 1SPD

  159. #359
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    Thanks for your quick response and for your help!
    Last edited by airwin88; 11-24-2018 at 04:31 PM.

  160. #360
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    Picked up a 95 or 96 930 frame today on the cheap. I ordered https://www.ebay.com/itm/254007843680 for it, but now I'm concerned it will be too small. Can anyone advise?

    Also, can someone tell me if this headset will work? Thanks!
    https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Moun...9-a5bdfdeae6ff

  161. #361
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    Quote Originally Posted by Airskank View Post
    Picked up a 95 or 96 930 frame today on the cheap. I ordered https://www.ebay.com/itm/254007843680 for it, but now I'm concerned it will be too small. Can anyone advise?

    Also, can someone tell me if this headset will work? Thanks!
    https://www.aliexpress.com/item/Moun...9-a5bdfdeae6ff


    I think that fork will be short by 30mm of the original forks A to C. A bit too much IMHO. The headset will work but for a few bucks more you can get something a little better...and to your door sooner depending on your location. (Origin8, FSA, Ritchey, etc....)
    "Just remember, all bikes have front suspension once you put your hands on the handlebars!" - 1SPD

  162. #362
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    My Trek 930 commuter

    I'm loving this thread and it inspired me to register and show my own Trek 930 in green & purple fade:
    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-43xkbwl.jpg
    This is my 1995 (?) Trek 930 that I built up as a daily commuter (6 miles each way). Highlights: Sanyo dynamo hub and B&M dynamo light system, Schwable Marathon Supreme 2" tires, Soma Clarence sweep back handlebars, Crank Brothers Candy pedals, Planet Bike fenders, Ergon cork grips. Original derailleurs, headset, rear wheel and seat post; all other components are replacements.

    For a relatively short commute, I don't think there's a better bike for the job.

  163. #363
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    Quote Originally Posted by hoppyhopper View Post
    ...Soma Clarence sweep back handlebars...
    I recently purchased the same bars for my 92 Trek 950. They will go on once I am recovered from a wrist injury.

    Good looking bike.

  164. #364
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    Quote Originally Posted by katsup View Post
    I recently purchased the same bars for my 92 Trek 950. They will go on once I am recovered from a wrist injury.

    Good looking bike.
    Get well soon and enjoy! One thing to be aware of: since the Clarence bars are curvy, you might not be able to slide them through the clamp of the old-style stems that were designed for flat bars. I had to convert my Trek's stem to a threadless adapter to use the modern stems that have a removable bolt-on clamp stem.

  165. #365
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    Quote Originally Posted by hoppyhopper View Post
    Get well soon and enjoy! One thing to be aware of: since the Clarence bars are curvy, you might not be able to slide them through the clamp of the old-style stems that were designed for flat bars. I had to convert my Trek's stem to a threadless adapter to use the modern stems that have a removable bolt-on clamp stem.
    Good to note, I should of test fitted it when I had the bike apart yesterday. The bike currently has Velo Orange Tourist bars to get upright and that bend went through the clamp fine. It is going to be my recovery bike and is setup to get less weight off my wrist.

  166. #366
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    Axle to crown length?

    Delete this post.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-a3b39957-7a19-46ae-9547-e23adc213e2a.jpg  

    Last edited by theMotoMan; 02-09-2019 at 12:16 PM. Reason: Need to delete post.

  167. #367
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    Axle to crown length

    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-dea846aa-43ae-4109-9025-00e4760b82f2.jpg
    Quote Originally Posted by daytonadogie View Post
    Click image for larger version. 

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    I'm having problems uploading pictures, but this is the finished product.
    Disk brakes, 1st gen XTR crankset, 29'r conversion by removing the seat stay and chain stay bridges, Salsa fork, Biopace chainring. I had everything for this build just sitting around in my garage except for the Kenda Small Block 8 tires and the riser bar. I love that there are folks out there that appreciate these old Trek Singletrack bikes. I would like to think of this as sort of a restomod, combining old and new, for a one of a kind ride.
    I know this thread is old, so hopefully daytonadogie is still following this post. Im thinking of building a 69er, so I will need a fork that has a similar axle to crown length as the stock suspension fork that was an option on the 990s. I might want a slightly shorter A-C length to allow for fork sag and the extra radius size of the 29 wheel. What Salsa fork did you end-up using? A 26 or 29 fork? Anyone know the A-C length of the stock forks for these bikes?

    BTW, I did this same thing on a Trek 7000 several years ago and it worked beautifully, but I used an aluminum cyclocross fork from a Schwinn Fastback (see attached photo).

  168. #368
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    I have been following this thread for several years or so, and every now and then read the entire thing over again. My interest in these Treks came from wanting an American-made steel frame as the starting foundation for a commuter build. Custom frame builders abound, but I wanted to do more of a budget build (though a US custom made frame would still be incredible). These Treks hit a sweet spot with their availability, price, and quality.

    Here is my '96 Trek 990, which I purchased as a neglected old mtb a couple of years ago, and built it up into a reliable, no frills flatbar 700c commuter:










    Bike is in a 'rough build' stage, meaning that it is together and I'm still trying various components and parts to fine tune the ride. Once the fine tuning is done, it will be stripped down and completely rebuilt.

    The Rock Shox Judy that came with the bike was toast, so I replaced it with a steel 700c cross fork.

    Here is the rest of the build:

    Dura Ace 7410 cranks
    UN-54 BB
    ACE ti spindle pedals
    XT long cage read derailleur
    basic Shimano friction shifter
    Dura Ace 8 speed cassette
    Velocity wheelset
    alloy riser bars
    ergo grips
    Tekro cross levers
    Avid Single Digit 7 v-brakes in front
    Campy Chorus dual pivot brake in back
    XTR seatpost
    Random Orbea saddle
    cheap steel headset

    It is a bit of a mixmaster at this point, but what a fun bike! The light-ish build and 700c wheels have brought out the qualities of the frame, which I would describe as lively, nimble and smooth. I can ride no handed, but not for long, because it has very quick steering.

    Regarding the 700c conversion, I have road bikes and mountain bikes. I don't really notice the BB being higher. If it is, it doesn't present any problems. The biggest issue is the rear brake. Not an issue if you have a custom builder remove rear bosses and braze on new ones, but trying to build it on the cheap means finding a different solution. I drilled out the seatstay bridge to accept a road caliper brake, and find that I get good pad placement right at the very end of the adjustment. However, rear braking is very weak, and I think those cross levers and old brake pads may have a lot to do with it. Obviously dual pivot brakes have proven their decency, so more to work out there.

    The bike feels light, but I know it can go a lot lighter. That headset is a brick!

    I've been trying to do some research on these older Trek 900 series bikes. It appears as though there were 3 generations:

    1989-1993, lugged construction
    1994-1997, tig welded, separate seat stays
    1998-1999, tig welded, wishbone seat stay design

    I couldn't find any Trek 900 series steel-framed bikes in their catalog from 2000. My best guess is that at that point, aluminum and carbon were the most competitive frame material choices and by that point, steel was old news. Feel like I've just begun the research...still so much to learn.

    I think the biggest challenge with these frame is the geometry/fit. Decently long top tubes when compared to seat tube length. The head tubes, starting in 1994, were really squished at 85mm for most of the small and medium sizes. It can make getting the handlebars up high enough a bit of work. But it is worth it.

    I may be picking up a 3rd gen Trek 930 tomorrow, which still has the triple butted OX tubing, in a different size and we'll see how they compare.
    Last edited by AdventureManCO; 03-16-2019 at 03:11 PM.

  169. #369
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    Quote Originally Posted by CBR_TOY View Post
    I put a few more purple parts on mine. Purple nips, sealed jockey wheels, skewer set, cable crimps, pads, pedals, and 680mmx25.4mm riser bars.



    I realize that this is a ridiculously old post, but what riser bar is that? After a decade away, I'm just getting back into riding, and have both a mid to late-nineties Trek Jetta and Gary Fisher Aquila that I need to put into service.

  170. #370
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    simply added hydraulic discs an a proper handlebar with a normal reach stem instead of obnoxiously forward...

    Now the bike is a good gravel, pub crawl, light duty road, etc... The rear brake frame adapter has been problem free in the duty I've put it to (IOW, no downhilling or bike parks). Yes, that's an adapter on the seat post for my little girl's trail-a-bike.



    -Peter
    Last edited by pcrussell50; 09-10-2019 at 12:33 PM.

  171. #371
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    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-48944717351_750886b6e6_k.jpg

    1989 Trek 970 on the Kokopelli Trail back in October of this year

  172. #372
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    It's an 850 but really wanted to share.

    I stumbled across this thread a while ago when I started my 1996 Trek 850 project. I was looking for a high functioning, high end commuter that will blend in at the bike rack and not attract attention to the untrained eye. Added disc tabs, cut off all the braze-ons and added zit-tie cable guides for hydro hoses / full shift housing (a totally fun process!) and outfitted it with bombproff modern parts.

    Drivetrain: Sram X9 1x10, 36t ring, 11-36t cassette
    Hubs: Rear - Chris King, Front - Phil Wood (BOTH BOLT ON)
    BB: Chris King
    Headset: Chris King
    Cranks: Shimano LX (used)
    Rims: Mavic 717
    Tires: Maxxis DTH 26 x 2.5
    Fork: (different from photos) Redline Monocog Cromo
    Brakes: Shimano LX hydro

    I put a clear coat over the metal work to show off the scars! didn't want it looking too fresh when it's locked up.

    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-unnamed.jpg

    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-unnamed-2-.jpg

    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-unnamed-1-.jpg

  173. #373
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    I finished up a couple of vintage Treks over the last month or so. Both came to me in relatively terrible condition, but they fixed up nicely.

    The first is a 1997ish Trek 930. Quite a nice bike, if I must say. Pretty light for a front suspension. It needed a new bottom bracket and headset. But I ended up changing out quite a few parts, and went with a nifty patriotic red/white/blue theme.

    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-jc8y4ybh.jpg
    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-wtvv9eph.jpg

    The second is a 1990 lugged steel Trek 950. I kept the wheels and derailleurs, but pretty much everything else was changed out. She was stripped down to the frame, had the paint touched up and frame saver sprayed inside, and completely build back up into what is is today. I freakin' love this bike. Weight is right around 25 pounds exactly.

    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-lc3zpmqh.jpg
    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-fj0gakbh.jpg

  174. #374
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    Northeast Cruiser

    Disclaimer: this is my first bike build. Found a full Trek 930 on Craigslist and loved the metallic paint and lugged steel. I've wanted a cruiser bike for awhile, but hate the look & feel of faux-retro box bikes and thought this frame had some real character. Luckily, I was able to find 1990's Trek catalogues and service manuals on Vintage-Trek.com and determine this was a 1993 - from there I was able to start sourcing parts. I tried to stick to eBay at first, but my vision for the bike won over and I started buying parts. $20 bucks here, $20 bucks there sure adds up quick haha. To be fair, I tried to only buy parts that were on sale... in fact, I found that Brooks B17 saddle on-sale for $78 on Backcountry.com... it was the most expensive piece aside from the tires, which I picked up slightly below retail. Moved to V brakes, which aren't installed this photo as I'm waiting on the silver paint job on brake levers and arms to dry. I'm still waiting on a few finishing pieces for the SS drivetrain and will upload again when complete. Net: this cost a bit more than I initially thought, but by going as far as to service my own free hubs, make a DIY headset press, and completely overhaul a bike I've learned a ton and had fun doing it - was well worth the money. Looking forward to finishing this and riding it when the weather is nicer.

    Work-in-progress, but almost done.Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-img_5141.jpg

  175. #375
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pielord View Post
    Disclaimer: this is my first bike build. Found a full Trek 930 on Craigslist and loved the metallic paint and lugged steel. I've wanted a cruiser bike for awhile, but hate the look & feel of faux-retro box bikes and thought this frame had some real character. Luckily, I was able to find 1990's Trek catalogues and service manuals on Vintage-Trek.com and determine this was a 1993 - from there I was able to start sourcing parts. I tried to stick to eBay at first, but my vision for the bike won over and I started buying parts. $20 bucks here, $20 bucks there sure adds up quick haha. To be fair, I tried to only buy parts that were on sale... in fact, I found that Brooks B17 saddle on-sale for $78 on Backcountry.com... it was the most expensive piece aside from the tires, which I picked up slightly below retail. Moved to V brakes, which aren't installed this photo as I'm waiting on the silver paint job on brake levers and arms to dry. I'm still waiting on a few finishing pieces for the SS drivetrain and will upload again when complete. Net: this cost a bit more than I initially thought, but by going as far as to service my own free hubs, make a DIY headset press, and completely overhaul a bike I've learned a ton and had fun doing it - was well worth the money. Looking forward to finishing this and riding it when the weather is nicer.

    Work-in-progress, but almost done.Click image for larger version. 

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    Sounds like you went the same route as I did, "the expensive learning experience". LOL. My 950, posted above, ended up being way more expensive than I'd planned. So many little bits and parts to be ordered, that added up so quickly. But I tore the whole bike down to the frame, made my own headset removal tool and headset press, and successfully replaced the headset without any screw-ups. I also replaced the vintage bottom bracket with a modern sealed bearing unit.

    It was definitely more expensive than I'd planned, and was a lot more work than the initial idea of cleaning and replacing only broken parts. But I ended up with exactly the bike that I envisioned, and I know EVERYTHING about this bike. I know how much grease was applied, which bolts are thread locked, which parts are brand new; all of that stuff. And I got to learn a ton about restoring vintage bikes. So much fun.

  176. #376
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    Took my 950 fishing yesterday... (Ignore the off-kilter pic)Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-fish-bike.jpg

  177. #377
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    95 Trek 930 SHX with Fox F100 RL fork

    Mid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-img_2639.jpgMid to late 90's Trek 9xx series (930,950,970,990).............-img_2640.jpg

    Here's my bike which I bought brand new in 95. I haven't ridden it lately until about a year ago. This old thread gave me the idea to replace the Quadra 5 with the 2006 Fox fork ($100 ebay). It is a 100 mm travel but I used internal spacers to keep it at 80 mm. I might try 90 mm travel on the next oil change. Also changed out the stem, wider bars and V brakes because of the fork. 11-32 cassette for easier hill climbs. Still using the 25 year old tires but alas, it is time for new rubber (Nobby Nic). I have to say, I'm very pleased, it is alot of fun riding trails in the SF bay area. About 300 miles so far in the last few months off road. The new fork is a significant improvement. Thanks for all the advice and tips from the forum.

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