Results 1 to 24 of 24
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    241

    I got this ole girl for a steal..(Proflex Porn)

    Watched this 1995 Proflex 855 World Cup Design for a couple weeks on CL. I was in need for some decent v-brakes, shifters, tires, etc for my Rockhopper. I was having a tough time finding anything used on the interwebz so I started looking for whole bikes I could dismantle and like the components this bike had to offer. After seeing it in person it would break my heart to do so and decided to keep it and eventually find some shocks to get it functional again. And wouldn't you know its my second Proflex, and also second "Way Big" sized Proflex. Can anybody tell me how the World Cup Design was different from the regular 855? Anywho, enough rambling, onto said pics...



  2. #2
    All Lefty's, all the time Moderator
    Reputation: MendonCycleSmith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    15,684
    Suspensionforkparts.com has the elastomers you need to make it go boing boing boing again....

    Nice pick up, have fun with it!
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

    - FrostyStruthers



    www.mendoncyclesmith.com

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    241
    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith View Post
    Suspensionforkparts.com has the elastomers you need to make it go boing boing boing again....

    Nice pick up, have fun with it!
    Thanks! I plan too eventually or retrofit a new air shock in there. It was a good grab at $70. Anybody have any clue about the World Cup Design aspect of the bike?

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    77
    Quote Originally Posted by TheHolc View Post
    Thanks! I plan too eventually or retrofit a new air shock in there. It was a good grab at $70. Anybody have any clue about the World Cup Design aspect of the bike?
    $70 for a good ol' bike like that? That's hardly more than couch cushion change. Nice work there.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Posts
    701
    Quote Originally Posted by TheHolc View Post
    Can anybody tell me how the World Cup Design was different from the regular 855?
    My guess is that all '95 855 frames say "world cup design" Find one that doesn't then compare them. P.S. what's going on with the front tire?

  6. #6
    artistic...
    Reputation: colker1's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    7,314
    Quote Originally Posted by TheHolc View Post
    Thanks! I plan too eventually or retrofit a new air shock in there. It was a good grab at $70. Anybody have any clue about the World Cup Design aspect of the bike?
    They paid Bob Roll to ride for them around that time. Probably w/ susp. locked down so he could go faster.
    WTB: Bomber Z2 1 1/8 steerer, in good to excellent shape OR bomber rebuild kit.

  7. #7
    All Lefty's, all the time Moderator
    Reputation: MendonCycleSmith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    15,684
    They sponsored Hank Djernis, pretty sure he won Worlds on a Proflex.

    I'm not aware of design changes related to that, but I think they just started using that as a marketing call out.

    I cold be way off, too.
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

    - FrostyStruthers



    www.mendoncyclesmith.com

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Sep 2004
    Posts
    975
    Man that brings back memories of an 856 I had back in the day, that 855 is in great shape and a nice deal for sure. I still have an early Proflex serotta built frame w/original rigid fork I hope to restore someday. Stuck seatpost is my big challenge. Good reference on the elastomer source in this thread, thanks for that info!

  9. #9
    Bipolar roller
    Reputation: singletrackmack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    978
    That is a great deal for $70 and a fun retro classic as well. I love these old pro flex bikes because they are so unique. The rear suspension is so simple while the fork is so complicated. Such a dramatic difference to modern bikes all with their simple telescopic forks and overly complicated rear suspension designs.

    Another reason I love them is because they are fun to work on. Along with the elastomers called out, you can still get bushing kits to rebuild the pivot and the linkage fork on eBay. Just search profile or K2.

    The vector forks are pretty cool too. You can change the axle path by turning the top front link. This will either make the fork more plush and responsive to small bumps, or will act similar to a low speed compression on a modern fork, stiffening the fork to better resist pedal bob and fork dive as well as handle bigger hits vs the other setting. I don't think you could adjust the axle path on the later cross-link forks.

    Also, the 855 was named Dual Suspension Bike of the year in 1995 from Mountain Biking Magazine. I have the actual mag somewhere in my den.

    As far as the 855 "world cup" goes, that is the only 855 model. There is no non-WC 855 (if you didn't know, the first digit is the model number, the second digit is always "5", don't know why, and the last digit is the year). However, in 1995, the 955, Animal and 855 all had the pivot moved to behind the seat tube vs the previous years with it in front. In 1996 the 956 had it moved back to in front of the seat tube with a carbon swing arm, while the 856 had it in the same spot as the 855.

    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith View Post
    They sponsored Hank Djernis, pretty sure he won Worlds on a Proflex.

    I'm not aware of design changes related to that, but I think they just started using that as a marketing call out.

    I cold be way off, too.
    I don't think Djerins ever won the WC on a proflex. I am pretty sure all of his WC wins were with Ritchey. I think Proflex called it the world cup when they signed Djerins expecting that he would win. Maybe they jinxed themselves.
    Last edited by singletrackmack; 09-19-2016 at 01:29 PM.
    Get out of the gutter and onto the mountain top.
    .

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    241
    Quote Originally Posted by klasse View Post
    My guess is that all '95 855 frames say "world cup design" Find one that doesn't then compare them. P.S. what's going on with the front tire?
    I knew eventually somebody would ask lol, neither front nor back tire had tubes in it so I made the run to the LBS and got a few tubes yesterday although I have to swap one out as the wheel hole is too small for a Schrader valve to fit through. Bike is in great shape with Shimano XT all throughout the bike. The Grip Shifts look newer and in perfect condition and the brake levers are a brand or model i've never heard of. They look to read "Real" in white lettering. Also, the rear tire has a really clean TNT Performance Hub although I know nothing about them, I'm going to have to do a bit of research. Thanks for all the feedback guys.


  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: phattruth's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    473
    Quote Originally Posted by TheHolc View Post
    I knew eventually somebody would ask lol, neither front nor back tire had tubes in it so I made the run to the LBS and got a few tubes yesterday although I have to swap one out as the wheel hole is too small for a Schrader valve to fit through. Bike is in great shape with Shimano XT all throughout the bike. The Grip Shifts look newer and in perfect condition and the brake levers are a brand or model i've never heard of. They look to read "Real" in white lettering. Also, the rear tire has a really clean TNT Performance Hub although I know nothing about them, I'm going to have to do a bit of research. Thanks for all the feedback guys.

    Real Levers are very nice. I have a set of their chainrings. They were high end aftermarket back in the 1990's. The TNT hub is another nice gem. They also made high end parts in the 1990's. You could likely sell those parts on ebay for what you paid for the bike.
    The Truth will set you free.

    ....but it might offend you first!

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    14
    Proflex?!?!?! I remember them! I never owned one of their builds, but as a kid I dreamed of it. If I remember correctly, they were reviewed quite well my Mountain Bike Action at the time. Your pictures bring back a rush of memories.

    As was mentioned above, those TNT hubs are top-shelf premium hubs from the time. I remember looking at those and including in my fantasy dream bike build. If you have a Mountain Bike Action from around '95 you'll see a nice full page ad for them.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2014
    Posts
    77
    If you can get used to Presta valve tubes, they have several advantages:

    -smaller hole in the rim means greater strength there, especially with narrower rims
    -air pressure holds the valve closed, rather than the spring in the Schrader valve. This may help make inflation with a hand pump easier
    -easy to deflate with a simple tap on the valve end
    -your friends with the other cool bikes likely use Presta tubes, so when they need to toss you spare, you know what to do with it
    -most good pumps fit Presta, and you can carry a $1 Schrader adapter in your patch kit, just in case

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    241
    Quote Originally Posted by Victor_c3 View Post
    Proflex?!?!?! I remember them! I never owned one of their builds, but as a kid I dreamed of it. If I remember correctly, they were reviewed quite well my Mountain Bike Action at the time. Your pictures bring back a rush of memories.

    As was mentioned above, those TNT hubs are top-shelf premium hubs from the time. I remember looking at those and including in my fantasy dream bike build. If you have a Mountain Bike Action from around '95 you'll see a nice full page ad for them.
    Thanks for all that info! From what it sounds like I found a pretty nice bike(for the 90's) for a hell of a deal! And in great shape!

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Posts
    14
    Stupid question, but are you actually riding it? I personally would love to own a mid-upper end bike from that era to ride. That was the sort of bike I dreamed of.

    I personally own a 1991 or '92 GT Talera (I think it was a $350-400 bike at the time) and a fully tricked-out 2001 GT Zaskar Team (at the time I dumped about $5k into the build). I got back into mountain biking about 2 months ago after taking off more than a decade from the sport and I've been riding the crap out of my Zaskar. At the end of the current season or early next spring I plan on getting a 2017 bike, provided that I'm still into mountain biking.

    I don't ever plan to get rid of my old rides. My early 90s GT Talera feels repulsive to ride after using riding my 2001 Zaskar. However my 2001 Zaskar feels nearly as archaic after test riding a couple of upper-end trail bikes from Trek and Yeti.

    To me, the juxtaposition of riding bikes from different eras is fun. It is amazing how far things have progressed on mountain bikes over the last couple of decades.

  16. #16
    Bipolar roller
    Reputation: singletrackmack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Posts
    978
    Quote Originally Posted by Victor_c3 View Post
    Stupid question, but are you actually riding it? I personally would love to own a mid-upper end bike from that era to ride. That was the sort of bike I dreamed of.

    I don't ever plan to get rid of my old rides. My early 90s GT Talera feels repulsive to ride after using riding my 2001 Zaskar. However my 2001 Zaskar feels nearly as archaic after test riding a couple of upper-end trail bikes from Trek and Yeti.

    To me, the juxtaposition of riding bikes from different eras is fun. It is amazing how far things have progressed on mountain bikes over the last couple of decades.
    About 6 years ago I saw a Proflex 555 at a thrift shop for $75ish bucks. Like new condition with whiskers still on the original tires. I also had/have a mordern mtb, 130m to 150mm full squish, modern geo with a super long top tube, short stem, very wide bars, plus size tires and so on.

    I picked up the Proflex, 1 because I always wanted one back in the day and, 2 because I needed another bike that I could just take the dogs out with everyday and I was tired of doing the 20-30 hour maintenance every other week that modern suspension bikes require. I also had a rigid, but at the time was under the impression it would have been way to harsh to ride in Tahoe.

    My first ride on the Proflex I was shocked at how bad the riding position felt and it seemed like my face was way too close to the front wheel and the ground. However, I was just taking this bike out with the dogs on some oldschool Tahoe singletracks, and nothing gnarly so it I wasn't concerned. But then, I started to like the aggressive riding position again, I was getting used to the super quick cornering the short wheel base, steep HTA and low stack provided and next thing I knew, I was railing the old singletracks on this bike in ways I could not with a modern mtb. It was crazy fun!

    So then I decided to get my first mtb (1991 trek 970) tuned back up just to see if I still likes the rigid ride. Holy sh!t did that bike jam! I couldn't beleive it. And now, my preferred type of mtb to ride is an old school geo early to mid 90's bike. I only use my mordern full squish when hitting the more gnarly black diamond singletracks when the mordern geo and suspension is actually needed.

    Now, to me, mordern Mtbs are like lifted 4x4 trucks with their hugs wheels, tires and suspension that can pretty much smash over anything, while old school Mtbs are more like rally cars.
    Last edited by singletrackmack; 09-24-2016 at 12:13 PM.
    Get out of the gutter and onto the mountain top.
    .

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    241
    Quote Originally Posted by Victor_c3 View Post
    Stupid question, but are you actually riding it? I personally would love to own a mid-upper end bike from that era to ride. That was the sort of bike I dreamed of.

    I personally own a 1991 or '92 GT Talera (I think it was a $350-400 bike at the time) and a fully tricked-out 2001 GT Zaskar Team (at the time I dumped about $5k into the build). I got back into mountain biking about 2 months ago after taking off more than a decade from the sport and I've been riding the crap out of my Zaskar. At the end of the current season or early next spring I plan on getting a 2017 bike, provided that I'm still into mountain biking.

    I don't ever plan to get rid of my old rides. My early 90s GT Talera feels repulsive to ride after using riding my 2001 Zaskar. However my 2001 Zaskar feels nearly as archaic after test riding a couple of upper-end trail bikes from Trek and Yeti.

    To me, the juxtaposition of riding bikes from different eras is fun. It is amazing how far things have progressed on mountain bikes over the last couple of decades.
    There's no stupid questions, but yes I plan on riding it eventually. If you look closely in the pic you will notice the elastomers have melted out so I need to either get new ones from the link provided above or get a coil spring to fit both front and rear suspensions. So currently it is unridable. I am also getting my 1992 RockHopper up and running as well, but being a HT it will be much easier, just have to replace a cable in my grip shift and she will be ready to ride. But I am really anxious to ride the 855.

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    4
    Old thread but I've recently become enchanted by the Proflex bikes. I bought a small 856 new in '96 for my wife and we still have it. I replaced the elastomers with those from Jim at suspensionforkparts dot net and am happy with the results. These elastomers are transparent urethane, not opaque yellow like the originals. They may have a little less travel than the OEM parts, but I think they are as close as you can get and the transparent appearance is kinda cool.

    Somewhat like a crazy old lady accumulating cats, I've recently bought a few more Proflex bikes on ebay and craigs list. I'm finishing a resto-mod on an 855. Working with Ryan at nulifecycles dot com, I've updated to Noleen front and rear coil-over shocks, piggy back at the rear. Ryan was also able to provide a bunch of used Proflex parts at a reasonable price, it was a pleasure working with him. Also I installed some modern Magura hydraulic rim brakes which were standard on the contemporary Proflex Animal in 1995. On my first ride I was really impressed with how well the bike climbed, maybe better than my modern Trek Fuel EX! However, down steep hills was positively frightening! After being used to a modern slack head tube angle together with a short stem and wide bars, the 1995 riding position is very scary down hill. I fitted a shorter stem (90 mm) and wider bars (680 mm). I didn't go all the way to modern stem and handle bar dims to somewhat preserve the look of the bike. Anyway, to install a standard stem on the 855 required the exchange to a longer 856 steering tube and upper link for the fork. After these changes, the bike was much more comfortable to me, still climbed amazingly but descended a bit twitchy and nervous.

    Then I saw a large '98 Proflex/K2 4000 on Craig's list. I don't think the carbon-fiber swing arm looks as good as the aluminum on the 855/856, but this bike came with the Noleen suspension standard and was in good shape. I also changed it to a shorter stem and wider bars and found this bike to have a very different personality. The head tube angle on the large 4000 is much slacker than the medium 855 and it actually feels quite good on the down hills. Suspension travel is a bit more than the 855/856 but still quite small by modern Trail bike standards. Descends much better, but the climbing and XC jamming is more numb than the 855.

    So anyway, I've been having quite a bit of fun running these old bikes even on some slightly challenging trail rides. And the cost of these vintage bikes is so low that you can enjoy the hobby/sport without blowing through way too much money!
    Last edited by Try2bFast; 03-14-2018 at 10:07 AM.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    241
    Quote Originally Posted by Try2bFast View Post
    Old thread but I've recently become enchanted by the Proflex bikes. I bought a small 856 new for my wife and we still have it. I replaced the elastomers with those from Jim at suspensionforkparts dot net and am happy with the results. These elastomers are transparent urethane, not opaque yellow like the originals. They may have a little less travel than the OEM parts, but I think they are as close as you can get and the transparent appearance is kinda cool.

    Somewhat like a crazy old lady accumulating cats, I've recently bought a few more Proflex bikes on ebay and craigs list. I'm finishing a resto-mod on an 855. Working with Ryan at nulifecycles dot com, I've updated to Noleen front and rear coil-over shocks, piggy back at the rear. Ryan was also able to provide a bunch of used Proflex parts at a reasonable price, it was a pleasure working with him. Also I installed some modern Magura hydraulic rim brakes which were standard on the contemporary Proflex Animal in 1995. On my first ride I was really impressed with how well the bike climbed, maybe better than my modern Trek Fuel EX! However, down steep hills was positively frightening! After being used to a modern slack head tube angle together with a short stem and wide bars, the 1995 riding position is very scary down hill. I fitted a shorter stem (90 mm) and wider bars (680 mm). I didn't go all the way to modern stem and handle bar dims to somewhat preserve the look of the bike. Anyway, to install a standard stem on the 855 required the exchange to a longer 856 steering tube and upper link for the fork. After these changes, the bike was much more comfortable to me, still climbed amazingly but descended a bit twitchy and nervous.

    Then I saw a large '98 Proflex/K2 4000 on Craig's list. I don't think the carbon-fiber swing arm looks as good as the aluminum on the 855/856, but this bike came with the Noleen suspension standard and was in good shape. I also changed it to a shorter stem and wider bars and found this bike to have a very different personality. The head tube angle on the large 4000 is much slacker than the medium 855 and it actually feels quite good on the down hills. Suspension travel is a bit more than the 855/856 but still quite small by modern Trail bike standards. Descends much better, but the climbing and XC jamming is more numb than the 855.

    So anyway, I've been having quite a bit of fun running these old bikes even on some slightly challenging trail rides. And the cost of these vintage bikes is so low that you can enjoy the hobby/sport without blowing through way too much money!
    Glad to hear these old bikes are still getting some love, I feel like old full suspension bikes are much more costly to keep up and maintain due to the scarcity of the parts these days. You should look into Risse Shocks for a better, more longterm option to elastomers if you get a chance. From what I hear they are amazing to work with and have several options for the Proflex.

    https://www.risseracing.com/index.shtml

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by TheHolc View Post
    Glad to hear these old bikes are still getting some love, I feel like old full suspension bikes are much more costly to keep up and maintain due to the scarcity of the parts these days. You should look into Risse Shocks for a better, more longterm option to elastomers if you get a chance. From what I hear they are amazing to work with and have several options for the Proflex.

    https://www.risseracing.com/index.shtml
    I'm sure that some old full-suspension bikes now need custom parts to keep them going and that could get very expensive. But there were a lot of Proflex bikes made so there are a lot of used spare parts out there and the three companies mentioned above are supporting Proflex bikes with new suspension parts at reasonable prices.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
    Reputation: jimbowho's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Posts
    857
    Good score OP if you're still out there. I use (fasstflex) bars on my moto's. They come with 4 elastomers each a different stiffness. Color coded. I use the red (medium) on my 91-stumpy's suspension stem. Works well. You can just buy the bumper kit separate.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mr_manny's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    241
    Look forward to years of service...I've owned my 954 for 20+ years.

    It's evolved over the years:
    Narrow bars
    Thumb shifters
    Cantilever brakes
    V-brakes
    Sachs grip shift
    Raiser bars

    Currently she's a single-speed...that's still fun to ride
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails I got this ole girl for a steal..(Proflex Porn)-proflex02.png  

    I got this ole girl for a steal..(Proflex Porn)-proflex03.jpg  

    I got this ole girl for a steal..(Proflex Porn)-proflex01.jpg  

    I got this ole girl for a steal..(Proflex Porn)-proflex06.jpg  

    Last edited by mr_manny; 10-23-2018 at 06:57 PM.

  23. #23
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Posts
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by mr_manny View Post
    Narrow bars
    ...that's still fun to ride
    Nice pics! The action shot in the air with the narrow bars is classic!!

  24. #24
    mtbr member
    Reputation: mr_manny's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Posts
    241
    Thanks!!
    I still have that classic etto helmet...probably older then many mountain bikes here on mtbr :P

Similar Threads

  1. Is this a steal?
    By J Hartman in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 12-19-2013, 03:53 PM
  2. Bikes no one would steal
    By HelmutHerr in forum General Discussion
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 07-16-2013, 02:31 PM
  3. CPS - They steal Children
    By highdelll in forum Off Camber (off topic)
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: 04-30-2013, 01:15 PM
  4. Don't steal my ride!!!
    By eatdrinkride in forum Riding Passion and Stories
    Replies: 32
    Last Post: 07-27-2011, 10:33 AM
  5. Girly-girl vs out door girl
    By oldbroad in forum Women's Lounge
    Replies: 72
    Last Post: 09-04-2005, 06:42 PM

Members who have read this thread: 57

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2018 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.