Do you miss having just one bike?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Do you miss having just one bike?

    SEriously.. i do. It's like having sex w/ 3 girls in bed every night x being in love.
    One bike that you ride all the time till every gear is worn. The one w/ battle scars but true to every millimeter. That you customized along the time at the lbs swapping for lighter and handmade parts..
    WTB: Bomber Z2 1 1/8 steerer, in good to excellent shape OR bomber rebuild kit.

  2. #2
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    I absolutely enjoy having a variety of bikes and even a few of the same frame with different builds.
    Wanted: more of the same ... but different

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by colker1 View Post
    SEriously.. i do. It's like having sex w/ 3 girls in bed every night x being in love.
    One bike that you ride all the time till every gear is worn. The one w/ battle scars but true to every millimeter. That you customized along the time at the lbs swapping for lighter and handmade parts..
    I totally know what you're saying and do feel the same to some extent, but there's no denying that I love the options and choices of several bikes. Besides the fun of riding different stuff, it also motivates me to ride sometimes.

  4. #4
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    Have you ever gotten dressed for a ride and then spent too much time in the garage staring at all of the options and trying to decide which bike to ride? It takes away riding time.

    That said, it is nice to have spares for when your go-to bike is down.

  5. #5
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    It's nice to have at least 2 good trail worthy do-it-all bikes, as stated above, 1 always needs maintenance. Broken spokes, broken hubs, suspension re-builds, deep cleaning.

  6. #6
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    I have a lot of bikes that I want to put some ride time on before they find new homes. I do this so I can understand better how the ride characteristics of these bikes vary. Is a Bontrager really a great climber and a terrible descender? Does a Yeti get more stable the faster you go? Is a Klein Attitude really as painfully rigid as people say? Is the East Coast geometry of a Yo Eddy really that unique? Are URT suspension bikes as bad as people say?

    This led to the question "how many rides does one need on a bike to really know the characteristics?" I decided that two rides was too few, because you might get the tire pressure wrong or not have it set up right. Six or more rides and I'm never going to get through this process. So I settled on 4 rides.

    With a dozen bikes needing this treatment, that something like 48 rides on bikes I'm going to get rid of. In the mean time bikes that I know are great riding bikes are collecting dust. Too many bikes. I should pick a few and ride them for years and form a tight bond.

  7. #7
    The Crazy Cat Lady of VRC
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    In the early 90's my 830 Trek was the only bike I owned, I rode it EVERYWHERE.

    I had a set of skinny Specialized Fatboys that I would swap out for the Ground Controls when I switched from dirt to pavement, (daily, and sometimes more than once a day depending on my mood). I was single and the women were a revolving door (not swapped as regularly as the tires, but close to it, lol).


    Fast forward to today, I've been faithfully married 20+ years....but now I have a garage full of every version of two, (and one), wheel rides imaginable...go figure.



    Steve

  8. #8
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    DC, If you need help testing the characteristics of your bikes, let me know and I'll swing down and ride your bikes with you. That way you can have two bikes out at the same time and test them side by side in identical conditions. Should allow you to get through them twice as fast.

    ECS, I was a 1-bike guy for many years, but with 2 sets of wheels (1 road/commuter and 1 off-road). I did have the same lady the whole time, though and still do 24+ years later.

  9. #9
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    Re: Do you miss having just one bike?

    I do, I do! I'm glad your started this thread. We need a support group to help us sort through the odd feelings we get.

    The maintenance, the staring so long and making a choice on which bike (and then it gets too late to ride etc.), the cost, the jealousy between bikes (I swear they knock each other over in the garage sometimes) .... It can be rough.

    The thought of selling all but one, comes to mind many, many times.

    And then I stop thinking such horrible thoughts and buy yet another bike.

  10. #10
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    "DC, If you need help testing the characteristics of your bikes, let me know and I'll swing down and ride your bikes with you. That way you can have two bikes out at the same time and test them side by side in identical conditions. Should allow you to get through them twice as fast."

    Deal! Come to the vintage ride here in Aug. 31 and we will line them up for laps.

  11. #11
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    No, I love having different bikes for different types of rides. If I am doing a trail ride, I grab my mtn bike with front suspension. If I am riding downtown for a couple beers and a bite to eat, it's my light, rigid aluminum mtn bike with road tires and lights. A long training ride on the road, it's my carbon road bike. A trip to the beach brings out the vintage beach cruiser to putt along the strand. Keeps it fun. I have a couple cars too. Today, I am driving my truck because I have a bunch of projects but I can't wait for the next Sunday drive in the convertible waiting in the garage.

  12. #12
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    Anyone who feels this way should consider moving to NYC. I can only keep 2, maybe 3 built bikes in my apartment.

    I do however miss the "1 bike stage" of my life. Things were a lot simpler.
    Don't call it a gooseneck.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by DoubleCentury View Post
    I have a lot of bikes that I want to put some ride time on before they find new homes. I do this so I can understand better how the ride characteristics of these bikes vary. Is a Bontrager really a great climber and a terrible descender? Does a Yeti get more stable the faster you go? Is a Klein Attitude really as painfully rigid as people say? Is the East Coast geometry of a Yo Eddy really that unique? Are URT suspension bikes as bad as people say?

    This led to the question "how many rides does one need on a bike to really know the characteristics?" I decided that two rides was too few, because you might get the tire pressure wrong or not have it set up right. Six or more rides and I'm never going to get through this process. So I settled on 4 rides.

    With a dozen bikes needing this treatment, that something like 48 rides on bikes I'm going to get rid of. In the mean time bikes that I know are great riding bikes are collecting dust. Too many bikes. I should pick a few and ride them for years and form a tight bond.
    Oh my gawd. Or get less bikes!

    AND

    I commend everybody on their long marriages. More rare than a well ridden Adroit!

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by girlonbike View Post
    Or get less bikes!
    That's the plan. A lot less.

  15. #15
    Axe
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    Do you miss having just one bike?

    I have never had just one bike, maybe for a few months as a kid, so I have no idea.

    I am with the same girl for 15 years now, and it is as many women in my life as I can handle...

  16. #16
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    I look at my collection every year and say "gotta get it down to 12" I figure that's a good number, a solid number a number you could stand behind and believe in. Then as my gaze enters the next minute "okay maybe a bakers dozen, that's doable". Then someone goes and puts a good deal on CL and undermines the whole internal dialogue.

    One bike? That's crazy talk.
    Technology dragass

  17. #17
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    Damn craigslist.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shane5001 View Post
    Damn craigslist.
    I know - you can buy a lot of wives there!

    I've been with the same woman since April 6, 1981
    As she will point out, I was almost correct once - January 17, 1996. Almost
    But she never questions me about my bikes.
    Wanted: more of the same ... but different

  19. #19
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    I have 3 rides and one wife. The wife agrees.

  20. #20
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    After spending an hour looking for some TA chainring bolts I know I have, I was just thinking one bike project at a time might be good. Where did I put them?

    I am with the Chef. 12 is a good number.
    Seek: Koski Trailmaster. Breezer Series 2 or 3. Cunningham Racer.

  21. #21
    Axe
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    Quote Originally Posted by longfinkillie View Post
    I have 3 rides and one wife. The wife agrees.
    They stop counting after 5. If you can make her agree with 5, next dozen will go unnoticed. Buying bikes part by part helps.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by tductape View Post
    Where did I put them?
    Your second spare parts Rubbermaid 24 gallon bin on the top shelf.

  23. #23
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    Single now for 18 years with 18 bikes. Coincidence?
    Zip ties? Not on my bike!

    Want:
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  24. #24
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    You guys are so funny. I'd much rather have a spouse super happy with a hobby that involves exercising than one that involves dice, slots and cards.

    You also probably lose a lot less having a few dozen bikes than a few weekend binges in Vegas.

  25. #25
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    Do you miss having just one bike?

    I feel you on this one.
    I bought my first mtb in october, and a couple of months later i bought my fatbike. My 29'er was just left in the bedroom with my wife.
    Besides taking too much space in my small apartment and the mrs Not being happy with two bikes in the bedroom, i really felt like it was a waste of a Nice and almost brand new bike.
    So i sold it and made my friend really happy



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  26. #26
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    Well, since this has morphed into a discussion as much about wives as bikes, I'll toss this in.

    I don't know when she really stopped paying attention, but it was rough going for many years. You bought another bike? Why? I just don't understand, and you need to get rid of some of these. What a waste of money.....

    I think that likely between finally getting her into riding, (she now has at least a half dozen rides in the barn) and me moving my collection from the very visible barn, to work, where she spends little time, and is filled with other bikes that aren't mine, she finally just realized I have a problem, and at least yes, I don't spend $ on hookers and blow, and still manage to pay all the bills on time.

    A buddy has a funny story about this. They are very comfortable financially, so it wasn't that. His wife was just beside herself when he mentioned he was buying another bike. He has, maybe 3? So this was 4. They went round and round, her just wanting to understand, him explaining why this one was different, did stuff the others didn't, but since she didn't ride, those made little sense to her way of thinking. It's a bike, you ride it on trails, what could be different?

    Finally, it hit her. Oh, so wait, I get it, this is kind of like shoes, right?

    Yes dear, exactly.



    My collection consists of a large number of bikes that I've never even ridden. They represent points in time, things I'd always thought were cool, something I saw, and just really liked the form of, stuff like that. I guess I'm part hoarder, part artist, part long time cyclist with enough room and money to pursue those convergent desires.

    I do have a bunch of stuff that actually gets ridden, a lot.

    But as I've said before, I've been ruined by modern suspension, disc brakes, 29ers, fat bikes, etc. I ride a rigid 26" with cantis every now and then, and think, okay, I survived that ride, had a little bit of fun, and can now hang this back up and enjoy talking about the era that it represents, technology, builder stories, etc, with a customer who asks about it.

    Would I sell them? Some, sure, some, maybe, some, man, it would really hurt. But, we're talking about moving into a different house, one where I can work from home, and that may well involve thinning the herd a bit, as well as getting rid of a frightening amount of accumulated parts and such. Not looking forward to it, but the cash generated would allow me to have a nice little purse to pursue some grail bike or another!
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

    - FrostyStruthers



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  27. #27
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    There's an old joke, which can be repurposed for any hobby, fishing, surfing, bikes etc.

    "My wife said if I buy another vintage mountain bike she'll leave me.

    ...I'm gonna miss her."

    My wife knew about my condition before we were married. In fact, I bought her disc brakes for one birthday and presented them to her before we went out to dinner. She wasn't thrilled but was appreciative. Then over dinner I dragged out the ring and proposed. The disc brakes were just a ruse. Anyway, she gets it, and I'm lucky to have her for more than just that reason. I don't drink to excess, I smoke 2 or 3 cigars per year and I don't gamble. I pay for everything in cash and my change gets saved up and that's why pays for a lot of my bike parts.

    As for the question, do I miss having just one bike? Yes. My first real MTB was a GT LTS (also the only complete bike I ever bought new). It went from original spec to a XC race spec to a do-it-all play bike spec over time. The bike went everywhere and when something broke, I didn't ride it until it got replaced, so I got onto it pretty quickly. If it was an all day epic ride, I took the LTS, if it was a technical ride with butt clenching descents, I took the LTS. If I rode past a skate park or a BMX track, I'd hit it up on the LTS. I still have that LTS and it's in the queue for a makeover.

    Now that I have an embarrassing number of MTB, road and BMX bikes, life is no less fulfilling, and I do have a Santa Cruz Superlight that sees the most trail time but it's nice to have the choice of weapons. Although with a bike out of action it tends to stay out of action for a while until I get around to sorting it out.

    I miss the simplicity of single bike ownership but I don't regret my hobby and passion for bikes.

    Grumps

  28. #28
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    Re: Do you miss having just one bike?

    I miss how I felt about my fourth bike. It was my first mountain bike, and the first bike I rode for sport. It wasn't a great bike, though I think it was reasonably par for its time. But it's not like I'd been on a bunch of different bikes. At that time, just the BMX I'd been on as a kid, the crappy road bike conversion I rode to high school for a while, and the hybrid I rode for a while and took to college.

    I think what I was really feeling was the excitement of getting into a sport that has become the main thing I do for myself over the years. I actually kind of regret having sold my first mountain bike. Riding it would be pretty pure nostalgia, I think.

    I don't miss having only one bike. I love that I can hop on a bike and go for a ride and have it be the right bike.

    I already had four bikes when I met my wife. It was never going to be a discussion. At that time, I had my hardtail, a nice road bike, a cyclocross bike I kept in off-road trim full-time, and a beater road bike set up to ride around town. So there wasn't a ton of overlap in their jobs. Funny enough, I find pedal systems to be one of the big drivers of keeping more than one bike.

    I'm up to five now. I gave my brother the road bike - it was always too big, but it was also my first nice bike and I had some sentiment to get over. And I broke the commuter. But I added a different road bike for commuting, a track bike for the velodrome, and I bought myself a shiny new full-suspension 29er when I finished my Master's.

    The hardtail was looking redundant but there's an awesome trail within riding distance from work, so now I keep it by my desk. The more recent commuter was looking redundant but I put some road pedals on it and when I put the 'cross bike back in off-road race trim after having it in road trim for a while, it became my only skinny-tired road bike. And the discs and fenders are really nice when the roads are wet.

    So at the moment, multiple bikes don't make it hard for me to choose at all. I just grab the one that matches the ride I'm heading out on, and go.
    "Don't buy upgrades; ride up grades." -Eddy Merckx

  29. #29
    Retro on Steroids
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    When I had just one bike, it 1973 and the bike was a Colnago. Great for getting somewhere quickly, but expensive, a maintenance and theft problem. Not the bike you want to use to go grocery shopping. So my roommate and I put together a couple of balloon tire one-speeds for town bikes, which eventually took us off road, and led to many adventures that are still going on today. I have never been confined to one bike since that day.

  30. #30
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    I have 5 bikes and have been married for 33 years. My wife has 2 bikes and she knows that if there is anything she doesn't like about one of here bikes I'm all over it. As I have gotten older, I am less of a collector, just for sake of having something, and more finding a purpose for each one. FWIW on the collecting side I also have around 25 surfboards, most of which I haven't ridden.

    For my bikes I have 2 80's Cannondales. I am converting my original one that was my fat boy bike until I lost 60 lbs to a triple and 32mm tires, if I can get them to fit, so I can ride with my younger brother who is into the triple multi-pupose stuff.

    My other Cannondale is an '88 criterium that I have setup with Dura Ace and Superbe Pro when it wasn't vintage. I stopped riding that when I put on the weight. Will be back on the road with it soon, but not sure of the steep geometry after all these years.

    I have 3 mountain bikes. The Trek 970 is the bike I take if I will be doing anything technical or anticipate pushing my ability on a ride. It is stable, predictable and handles everything well... rock solid.

    The Serotta is my ride with the wife, fitness, and go have fun mtb. It is a blast to ride, but even with the 70mm fork it is a handlful in some situations. If I had skills I would appreciate it more as it is like my criterium road bike.

    The GT was given to me and was my first experience riding a mountain bike. It is my loaner bike. Right now a friend of my son has it and when he is done I'll go through it and make sure it is good to go and someone else will ride it for a while.

    John
    1995 Trek 970 - 80mm Atom Race
    1992 Serotta T-Max - 70mm Z3 Light
    1993 GT All Terra - 46mm Mag 21
    (STOLEN)

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by chefmiguel View Post
    I look at my collection every year and say "gotta get it down to 12" I figure that's a good number, a solid number a number you could stand behind and believe in. Then as my gaze enters the next minute "okay maybe a bakers dozen, that's doable". Then someone goes and puts a good deal on CL and undermines the whole internal dialogue.

    One bike? That's crazy talk.
    I have a similar conversation myself. If I had to....absolutely had to, I could get down to 12 bikes. Maybe even 6. But I wouldn't like it. I love the options.
    -eric-

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  32. #32
    meh... whatever
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    Quote Originally Posted by chefmiguel View Post
    One bike? That's crazy talk.


    /thread
    "Knowledge is good." ~ Emil Faber

  33. #33
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    I could do just about everything i need to do on a bike and have a blast doing it with my Salsa Spearfish with two wheelsets. I've got 5 bikes, but the Spearfish is the only one that I could be happy with if I had to whittle it down to one. Would be very hard to give up my Kona Major Jake cross bike, though. The others I wouldn't miss that much.
    Are you really sure about that?

  34. #34
    Axe
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    Quote Originally Posted by MSLKauai View Post
    with two wheelsets.
    That's cheating. It is like 1.5 bikes, not 1.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by Axe View Post
    That's cheating. It is like 1.5 bikes, not 1.
    Can I keep an extra set of tires in the garage, or is that a rule breaker?
    Are you really sure about that?

  36. #36
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    Do you miss having just one bike?

    Quote Originally Posted by MSLKauai View Post
    Can I keep an extra set of tires in the garage, or is that a rule breaker?
    I go by the average value in spare parts, and count bikes by frame sets (frame and fork). Wheelset could be about third of a frame set? Plus tires and rotors.

    Accounting.

  37. #37
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    My ex wife and I are wonderful friends and when ever she comes over she wants to see the latest project, borrows bikes for boyfriends often and is always hitting me up for repair work. With that said, if we were still married there is no way I'd have the number of toys that I do now.
    Quote Originally Posted by girlonbike View Post
    You guys are so funny. I'd much rather have a spouse super happy with a hobby that involves exercising than one that involves dice, slots and cards.

    You also probably lose a lot less having a few dozen bikes than a few weekend binges in Vegas.
    Zip ties? Not on my bike!

    Want:
    650B rims or wheel set. 80's vintage 32 or 36 x 135mm

  38. #38
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    But to answer the question...Yes. I do miss the simplicity. Two wheel/tire sets was all needed and that was only to save time in changing out to slicks for my commutes.
    For me it gets to the point of too many projects, too many choices and never being completely happy with a build. The pile of incomplete projects is deep.
    Zip ties? Not on my bike!

    Want:
    650B rims or wheel set. 80's vintage 32 or 36 x 135mm

  39. #39
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    I'm glad to be down to two mountain bikes, one a 29er hardtail that I ride 90% of the time, and my trusty old 26" rigid Kona that I've owned for 20 years as a backup. When I had more bikes none of them really worked 100% the way I wanted- too few funds to maintain too many bikes. The other thing I noticed was that my handling skills seemed somewhat mediocre and I think it was partially because I rode several bikes with different setups and geometries and I never felt totally confident on any of them. Now that I've been riding pretty much one bike for the last 6 months I feel much better in tune with it and have been clearing obstacles that have stumped me for years.

    I think you could substitute girls for bikes in the above paragraph and it would also all be true

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by always_last View Post
    I'm glad to be down to two mountain bikes, one a 29er hardtail that I ride 90% of the time, and my trusty old 26" rigid Kona that I've owned for 20 years as a backup. When I had more bikes none of them really worked 100% the way I wanted- too few funds to maintain too many bikes. The other thing I noticed was that my handling skills seemed somewhat mediocre and I think it was partially because I rode several bikes with different setups and geometries and I never felt totally confident on any of them. Now that I've been riding pretty much one bike for the last 6 months I feel much better in tune with it and have been clearing obstacles that have stumped me for years.

    I think you could substitute girls for bikes in the above paragraph and it would also all be true
    I agree, switching between bikes never lets you get 100% in tune with one bike's handling traits.

  41. #41
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    Not only the handling but also the mechanics of the bike.
    Quote Originally Posted by Fillet-brazed View Post
    I agree, switching between bikes never lets you get 100% in tune with one bike's handling traits.
    Zip ties? Not on my bike!

    Want:
    650B rims or wheel set. 80's vintage 32 or 36 x 135mm

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeff View Post
    Not only the handling but also the mechanics of the bike.
    I deal with this because one of my two main bikes has a rapid-rise rear derailleur and the other is a standard spring. I usually miss 40% of my downshifts in the first half hour of my ride when I switch bikes.

  43. #43
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    Yes.

  44. #44
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    Not only that Mike but I've seemed to loose trust in my bikes also. Some is the caution I ride with now due to age and lack of saddle time but it's also that I'm just not dialed in with the bikes. Off road I split my time between 4 very different set ups. Maybe i should just quit whining and ride more.
    Zip ties? Not on my bike!

    Want:
    650B rims or wheel set. 80's vintage 32 or 36 x 135mm

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeff View Post
    Maybe i should just quit whining and ride more.
    This!


    See you on the trail!

  46. #46
    mtbr member
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    I have 7 bikes now after picking up a couple steals on Craigslist recently. When I proudly showed my wife the last bike (1988 Stumpjumper) she started giving me some resistance, you know, "what, not another bike?". The good news is, yesterday, she pointed to a bike that I have owned since 1987 and said "not another one"; bingo, I realized that she can't tell one from the others and wouldn't know it if I brought another one home. It's good to know, just in case I come across another vintage beauty that I can't resist. I'll just have to keep it to myself.

  47. #47
    Phobia of petting zoos.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Konasun View Post
    bingo, I realized that she can't tell one from the others and wouldn't know it if I brought another one home. It's good to know, just in case I come across another vintage beauty that I can't resist. I'll just have to keep it to myself.
    A friend of mine had a Giant hardtail. He bought a Giant Anthem which was the same colour scheme. Both bikes were silver and blue, both downtubes said "Giant". His wife never picked up on the fact that the bike somehow grew rear suspension.

    As much as I do not condone deceit, it must be said that it is easier to beg forgiveness than to seek permission.

    Grumps

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Uncle Grumpy View Post
    A friend of mine had a Giant hardtail. He bought a Giant Anthem which was the same colour scheme. Both bikes were silver and blue, both downtubes said "Giant". His wife never picked up on the fact that the bike somehow grew rear suspension.

    As much as I do not condone deceit, it must be said that it is easier to beg forgiveness than to seek permission.

    Grumps
    Yes, Grumps, we have a good relationship and I wouldn't lie to her. Fortunately, this hobby is just chump change to me so it's not the money. She just thinks that I'm bringing home old junk bikes and would rather I buy one $4,0000 bike. I tell her, I like working on them, they are nostalgic to me and their fun to ride. Im sure she gets it but likes to give me a hard time now and then.

  49. #49
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    Two different ways to ride for me. Night and day. I have my long travel trail bike which I keep updating to stay current and I have my retro rides.

    In my case I ride the hell outta my new bikes and old bikes but in completely different ways. The newer stuff gets ridden hard on the best trails around Washington. The older bikes are for leg pumping road and to a lesser extent trail rides. The nostalgia is there in bucket loads on the old bikes. But the trail ripping speed and confidence of the new stuff is alluring in it's own sense.

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