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  1. #1
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    Catamount MFS thread



    New here to this forum.

    Thought I start a thread for any Catamount MFS riders out there, myself included. I know some may say it's not quite vintage yet, but it's way to ancient to post in any other forum

    I recently rebuilt mine with some updated parts and will post pics as soon as I am done.

    Sweet Spot bikes tended to nose dive when applying the only the front brake. I installed a spare Manitou Minute 100 I had laying around and found that the SPV platform helps out tremendously with reducing the nose dive. I recommend it to any one out there on a Cat or similar (Szazbo, Schwinn S10, Mantra, etc).
    EDIT: Jeff clarified that the Catamount is not a Sweet Spot bike.

    Mine has been relegated to hanging in the attic for years. Then recently I saw that John Castellano has released an updated Sweet Spot bike called the Zorro. This gave me the idea to rebuild my Cat.

    With SPV fork, the Cat now rides very well I think. Mind you, it's best for just fireroads, slick rock and smoother single track.

    Let's see those Catamounts for the few of us still riding one.

    Last edited by Catamount Rider; 01-21-2010 at 09:26 PM.

  2. #2
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    Some pics I found on search:

    Jeff's old Cat


    Posted by AZJeff


    Posted by Stans4Bikes


    ItsDoable's Rohloff rig.

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    Geometry & Fit Chart

    Geometry & Fit Chart from original Catamount site.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Catamount MFS thread-catamount_geometry_fit.gif  


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    Frame Specs & Description



    More text from the old Catamount site.

    FRAME SPECS

    Catamount Cycles manufactures a unified rear triangle full suspension mountain bike, called the MFS (for mid-frame suspension). The frameset is divided into an upper frame and a lower swingarm assembly. The upper frame is handcrafted out of True Temper OX Gold steel to provide unsurpassed strength and fatigue life, and the lower swingarm is handcrafted out of a custom drawn Alcoa 6061 T6 alumninum to provide superior strength and rigidity with a very low weight. They are joined "in the middle", by a single pivot. The drivetrain is integrated into the swingarm, making biopacing impossible.

    The Catamount is designed to be ridden as a pure cross country bike with front fork travel of 3-4 inches. Only use single clamp/crown forks with no more than 100mm of travel to achieve the best ride performance. The use of double or triple clamp/crown forks, or forks with more than 100mm of travel are not recommended. This is because, the longer travel forks will change the geometry of the bike, so to make the handling slower, and increase the chance to damage the frame, due to the longer fork legs acting as a long lever applying torque to the headtube.

    The Catamount MFS has the following outstanding features:

    RIGID BOTTOM BRACKET. As stiff as a traditional frame

    RIGID REAR TRIANGLE. No rear wheel wash

    SINGLE PIVOT. This provides less maintenance, wear, flex, and slop

    NO BIOPACING. There is absolutely none in any gear or riding condition

    NORMAL SHIFTING. No extra chain is needed, no derailleur stress, and no flex from chain loads.

    EFFICIENT POWER TRANSFER. Due to the pivot's location.

    ACTIVE SUSPENSION. Pedaling and braking do not lock out the suspension.

    LONG TRAVEL. A very plush 4.5 inches of travel.

    BALANCED WEIGHT DISTRIBUTION. The bike is not "tail heavy".

    LIGHT WEIGHT. The frame without the shock weighs 5.0 pounds.

    SUPERIOR GROUND CLEARANCE. The pedals are part of the swingarm.

    SUSPENSION STIFFENS when riding out of the saddle with 2.25 inches of active travel.

    AMERICAN MADE. Catamounts are manufactured in Fort Collins, Colorado.

    FRAME GEOMETRY is built to use forks with 63 to 100mm of travel. Use only single crown/clamp forks.

    The bike handles effortlessly, holding a line on climbs and descents. The rear suspension provides incredible traction, allowing for climbing in a higher gear than usual. Control on descents in fantastic, made more so by the suspension being immune from brake lockout. Unlike other suspension systems, the Catamount handles both small bumps and big hits with equal assurance.

    Simply put, the Catamount MFS provides the fastest, safest, and most comfortable ride of any full suspension bike.
    Last edited by Catamount Rider; 01-21-2010 at 10:50 PM.

  5. #5
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    I remember finding it a simpler design compared to the Szazbo and liked that about it. Never got a chance to ride one but I still own a h2o cage from the company.

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    Old Newsletter

    Copy of an old newsletter sent out from Catamount back in the day...



    GREETINGS FROM CATAMOUNT CYCLES

    Thanks for expressing an interest in purchasing a Catamount. You can buy directly from Catamount Cycles. When you purchase a Catamount, detailed instructions are provided to help you set up your suspension to get the maximum performance from your bike.

    There are many differences between a Catamount and other full suspension bikes you may be interested in. The following information will help you to become a better informed and educated cyclist.

    How rigid is the Catamount frame?

    Remember, you want as rigid a frame as possible. One of the most important aspects of a bicycle frame is the lateral (side to side) flex. If there is lateral flex at the bottom bracket and the rear triangle, the riding performance will decrease. The more movement there is the more problems. Your chain will rub against the front derailleur, your gears will ghost shift, and the rear wheel will not track straight causing you to lose traction. The Catamount has one of the stiffest bottom bracket there is on full suspension bicycles. In fact, the bottom bracket of a Catamount is stiffer than many rigid hard tail bikes. The rear triangle has NO LATERAL FLEX, so the rear wheel will track directly under you in all riding conditions. A Catamount combines the plushness of 4.5 inches of rear wheel travel with the rigidity of a hard tail to produce the best climbing full suspension bike. You will climb faster with less effort riding a Catamount. Usually you will find yourself riding in one or two gears higher due to the tremendous traction you have from the rear wheel digging into the trail.

    Zap Espinoza of Mountain Bike Magazine writes, "... we came away thinking that the Catamount had a tighter rear end/one bike feel...This is no doubt due to the wider pivot, the bottom bracket's triangulation, and the massive 7/8 inch-square tubing used throughout the rear triangle. The result is a nice, unified ride".

    How many pivots does the frame have?

    All the multi-pivot bikes have problems with the pivots loosening up, and this will cause serious performance problems. The Catamount uses a unique bushing and pivot pin system. There is only one large pivot. A Catamount will not have loose pivot problems. The bushings are self lubricating and are designed to operate in a wet and dirty environment, so there is never a need to do any maintenance.

    Mountain Bike Magazine writes, "Another selling point with the Catamount is the single pivot, which... needs zero maintenance".

    How light is the frame?

    The 18" Catamount SL frame without a rear shock weighs 5 pounds. Mountain Bike Magazine writes, "The Catamount offers real race-worthy performance".

    How plush is the ride?

    One of the great advantages of Catamount's unified rear triangle design is the incredible plushness of the ride. The Catamount will make wash board roads feel like smooth pavement, and it will allow you to ride over rocks the size of bowling balls without having to get out of the saddle. The plush ride of a Catamount will allow you to remain seated during steep, rocky, and technical climbs. When out of the saddle there is still 2.25 inches of travel, so the suspension can absorb the impact energy of an unweighted hit.

    On descents you just slide backwards on your saddle and stay seated. This provides excellent traction to the rear wheel, and with 4.5 inches of travel you can ride through steep, rocky, and technical sections in complete control. All this without any bob or biopace problems * the Catamount will never do either in any gear or riding condition. Catamount owners tell us that they are able to clean sections on climbs and descents on their Catamounts that they were unable to do on other bikes.

    Mountain Bike Magazine says, "With a high-pivot URT, you always expect Barcalounger comfort when seated. But the Catamount goes beyond that, also providing high-speed pedaling efficiency".

    How does the bike handle single track?

    The Catamount was designed to be a very neutral handling bike in all types of terrain and at all speeds. The front end will track directly where you point it with very little effort. A Catamount will not fight you to start a turn or to hold a line. In very tight single track, at low or high speeds, it maneuvers with great precision. During high speed descents the bike is very smooth and accurate with perfect control. A Catamount works unlike any other bike on the market. It is built to be ridden hard over the most extreme terrain and still provide the plushest, most controlled, comfortable, and high performance ride of any bike you can buy.

    "It made Moab rock garden descents fun, and its stable handling saved my skin on the Slickrock trail". Fred Matheny Bicycling Magazine February 1995.

    Are you paying too much for another frame?

    Catamount has 2 framesets with 2 price options. All Catamounts are handcrafted.

    A Catamount is built at the highest standards of precision and quality. Catamount Cycles can build custom frame sizes. Please refer to the order form for information.

    "This is one SWEET bike. . .". raves Fred Matheny of Bicycling Magazine.

    • Four sizes/150 colors to choose from.
    • Catamount framesets fit people from 5'4" to 6'3".
    • We offer complete bike groups.
    • There are three Shimano groups.
    • Add to your Catamount frameset a Marzocchi fork to make the perfect balance of comfort, control, and performance.


    Zap Espinoza of Mountain Bike Magazine raves "... the (Catamount) MFS went from being a *****in' touring bike to a super-efficient racer." "... all I could talk about was how damn efficient this bike felt." "In the end, I still prefer bikes that provide good handling and comfortable rides,... The great thing about the Catamount MFS is that it seems to be both".

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    Mountain Bike Magazine Review by Zap Espinoza

    Mountain Bike (1996)

    COMFORT OR EFFICIENCY? CATAMOUNT SAYS TAKE BOTH.

    by Zapata Espinoza

    A funny thing happened during my first ride of the Catamount MFS (Mid Frame Suspension). But before we get into discussing Zippy's latest revelations, let's look at the bike. The Catamount is made by a two-person company in Fort Collins, Colorado. Larry Pastor and Scott Still are the two guys, and prior to starting up production last year, they did exhaustive research into rear-suspension designs. "Our goal wasn't as much to come up with something new as it was to develop something that worked well," says Pastor. "The first patent for a unified rear end was back in 1888, so its not like this is an altogether new technology."

    Catamount's one-bike line is based on an updated version of that old unified-rear-triangle (URT) design, and it's available in six sizes. Our 19-inch test bike weighed 26.75 pounds, featuring 6061 aluminum, top-quality welds, a top tube that's ovalized at the seat tube, CNC-machined and pocketed dropouts, bridgeless and crimped chainstays (for increased tire and crank clearance), and massive triangulation of the bottom bracket. The price for a Catamount frameset, complete with a Fox Alps 4R shock and pump, is $1,350. Catamount also offers the bike with three different component groups, with prices from $2,200 to $2,850. The company designed its frame around forks with 2.5 to 3 inches of travel. When mated to the rear end's 3.5 inches of travel, this makes for the ideal cross-country set-up.

    But what about that revelation?

    THE RECKONING

    Okay, I just came back from test-riding the Catamount and before I say anything else, I'd like to apologize directly to all my bike-geek, race-oriented friends who are always obsessing over how "efficient" a bike is. I've been known to malign you guys for this (urging you to instead obsess on something real, like how pretty the trail surroundings are). But to Mark, Chris, Cindy, Reece, Wick and anyone else I've dissed, I now say I'm sorry. I've seen the light.

    It happened after pumping the Catamount's Fox Alps 4R air shock to a higher-than-prescribed pressure. this gave me a ride quality unlike any I've ever had on a URT bike.

    Before I got to that point, thought, I experimented with different air pressures. Since I rode my first URT bike two years ago, I had generally set my shock settings on the soft side, especially on the high-pivot URTs (Schwinn, IBis), The reason was that their design encourages a seated position at all times, so I sought spring rates or air settings that complemented that style. But Catamount suggests that you set up its bike at about 40 psi over your body weights, with 1/8 inch to 1/4 inch of sag. I did that (at 185 psi) and it rode just fine. Next, I tried going softer, to 135 psi, and rode through the same rock-strewn creek bed. With the rear end bobbin all over the place I realized that it's wise to stay near the recommended set-up procedure. Or is it?

    When I pumped up the shock to 200 psi, even pushing down on the saddle with my hands would barely get the shock to compress. Given my experience on standard suspension bikes, I figured this one would ride too harshly if the shock were this stiff. Wrong! With the increased seated leverage of the Catamount's high pivot, the MFS went from being a *****in' touring bike to a super-efficient racer. Screw the scenery--all I could talk about was how damn efficient this bike felt.

    This IS a revelation: With a high-pivot URT, you always expect Barcalounger comfort when seated. But the Catamount goes beyond that, also providing high-speed pedaling efficiency. The only drawback. Well, as with all URT's, you lose the bump-eating capacity when you stand on the pedals, but if you're into seated comfort and speed, it's a price you might not mind paying.

    Other handling notes? The front end was a tad on the light side, as evidenced by the front wheel's wavering on slow-speed climbs. Another surprise was that the bridgeless chainstays don't hurt the rear-end's rigidity at all. In fact, we came away thinking that the Catamount had a tighter rear-end/one-bike feel than the Trek Y-bike. This is no doubt due to the wider pivot, the bottom bracket's triangulation and the massive 7/8-inch-square tubing used throughout the rear triangle. The result is a nice, unified ride. the 23.375-inch top tube was on the long side for an 18-inch frame. Most of our test riders who are used to an 18-inch frame felt stretched out (the 19-inch riders were comfy cozy). Catamount is spot on when it suggests that riders in the 5-foot-10 to 6-foot range should ride the 18-inch frame.

    WELCOME TO GEEKDOM

    Unified bikes still have a unique ride to them. This is their virtue, but also their curse. Many riders who are used to more traditional rear-suspension designs have yet to embrace URTs. They don't like the active/less-active quality, depending on whether you're seated or standing. And they're bothered by the rear-end rise that happens under hard braking. There was also a noticeable bob in the suspension on steep seated climbs, which cause the more anal-retentive among our testers (the static-leg-extension-is-next-to godliness-types) to have a fit.

    If you're making the move to full suspension from a hardtail, though, you won't be hampered by these preconceived notions and biases. Just be aware that the suspension ends as soon as you stand on the pedals. That may be no big deal to you. After all, not many bikes out there with multi-pivot designs offer the ideal, fully active, plush, smooth ride that everyone seems to be chasing. Nothing is perfect. Not yet.

    But some things are surprising. I had always considered URTs mostly touring bikes (because they work best when you're seated). Now I'm not so sure. The Catamount offers real race-worthy performance. A bonus: URTs have a penchant for wheelies, which can help you in rough race terrain as you try to move up in the pack (you can literally wheelie past the other bikes in the rough spots).

    As unfashionable as the air shock has become, this is a bike where is makes good sense, due to the URT's high leverage ratio. The same air shock that would offer a ton of stiction on a non-unified bike becomes super plush with a unified design. Another selling point with the Catamount is the single pivot, which uses the Gerlock bushing. Catamount says it needs zero maintenance.

    In the end, I still prefer bikes that provide good handling and comfortable rides, rather than some bike-geek inspired, praying-on-the-altar-of-efficiency race bike. The great thing about the Catamount MFS is that it seems to be both. It gave me brief entry into the work of geekdom--a place that my underpowered, skinny legs seldom experiences--and I have to admit, I kind of liked being there.

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    Bike Magazine Review (1995)

    BIKE

    UNIFIED REAR TRIANGLE

    by John Kukoda

    June 1995


    Like an alien injection of otherworldly DNA into the earthbound gene pool, a species of previously unknown, or more accurately, long-forgotten full-suspension bikes is accelerating the evolution of the species. These newcomers share an elegant, simple innovation that in one fell swoop transcends other designs' incremental improvements in pivot rigidity and shock function.

    The innovation is dubbed the "unified rear triangle" or URT. They share a common design that incorporates the entire drivetrain into one rigid structure, which is connected to the main frame at a single pivot point. This eliminates the problem many suspension designs have with the tensioned chain activating the suspension, which wastes the rider's energy.

    Multiple-pivot designs, typified by the "Horst link" style of the Mongoose Amp and Specialized FSR (See BIKE, March '94) cancel out this chain torque with additional pivots at the rear dropouts. But multiple pivots add complexity, wear out, and introduce unwanted flex. More bouncing results from the swinging mass of rider's legs. URT designs address all these concerns, and also eliminate drivetrain problems like ghost shifting, not uncommon with other suspension designs. Best of all, URTs deliver an average four inches of plush rear wheel travel.

    The URT bikes' most unique trait is their dual suspension function. Because the saddles is relatively far from the pivot point and the crank relatively close, standing on the pedals reduces the leverage on the system, which stiffens the suspension compare to the plushness it delivers when seated. Thus, without any rider-activated lockouts or mechanical gizmos, the plush-riding URT becomes more like a hardtail when standing for a climb or sprint.

    The tradeoff is that URTs that stiffen for a standing sprint also stiffen for a rough, standing descent. Again, the resulting harshness varied quite a bit among our test bikes.

    On paper, another tradeoff is the change in saddle-to-pedal distance as the shock compresses. I said "on paper," because, while I'm picky enough about perfect saddle height to get stressed over cycling socks of various thicknesses, I was seldom bothered by the bikes' dynamic crank-to-saddle relationship.

    The location of a unified rear triangle's single pivot has everything to do with the amount of change between sitting and standing shock action and the amount of inseam change. Among our test stable, comprising of s Schwinn Homegrown, Catamount MFS, Klein Mantra, and Trek Y-22, the difference between standing and sitting compression ranged from subtle in the Trek and Klein to dramatic for the Schwinn and Catamount, while bottom bracket movement varied from a quarter-inch with the Trek, to well over an inch with the others.

    A very real compromise is the lack of convenient water bottle locations on all the bikes. Either they were carried horizontally and leaked or they were stuck far from the rider's reach. A CamelBak is the obvious solution.

    CATAMOUNT MFS

    GENERAL COMMENTS

    Catamounts rendering of the URT concept rides a lot like the Schwinn, with which it shares a frame construction of welded aluminum and a Fox Alps 4 shock with adjustable damping. However, Catamount's leverage on the shock is higher than Schwinn's, which means it requires more pressure to deliver a similarly plush ride through its 3.5 inches of travel. Body weight plus 40 pounds is recommended, and while the shock can handle that pressure, some of the pumps Fox supplies cannot. Mine leaked before the pressure was reached.

    While a kissing cousin to the Homegrown, the Catamount is no clone. The frame design is cleaner and looks more "traditional"--if that word can apply to such a novel design. The triangular swingarm (versus Schwinn's busier four-sided affair) is constructed out of rigid 7/8-inch square tubing. Geometry, while still cross-country appropriate, is also a bit more speed-oriented, with an inch longer wheelbase, a more rangy top tube, and a less steep 71-degree head tube angle designed around a 2.5-inch travel suspension fork.

    Catamount sells only frames, for a reasonable $1,350. For $50 more, you can specify virtually any powdercoat combination.

    Catamount's Larry Pastor views his creation as the "ultimate cross-country racer" for rough courses, but acknowledges the bulk of his market is noncompetitors interested in comfort without sacrificing efficiency. No problemo, this bike has both bases covered.

    RIDE EVALUATION

    While offering the dual rider characteristics of other URTs, the Catamount retains a modicum more shock plushness out of the saddle. The difference is the slightly more rearward pivot, which provides a more forgiving 3.4-to-1 ration between seated and standing suspension action. that;s still not enough give to make the MFS a mindless climber on choppy, loose trails, however. The rider, not the bike, is still the controlling factor.

    Our test bike came equipped with a Halson Inversion fork, which worked OK for elastomers, but won't cause the folks at Rock Shox to lose much sleep. On rough descents, the front-end plushness didn't come close to matching the rear's. Singletracking rigidity was great however, with both ends of the bike responding as a single entity.

    A whoop-de-do'ed singletrack highlighted the bike's only flaw. Forced to stand by the closely spaced jumps, it felt like the pedals were lifting me skyward over every hump. Adjusting the shock to its hard-damped "4" setting reduced but didn't eliminate the pitching and bucking. On this undulating but otherwise fairly buffed trail, I think a hardtail is the rig of choice.

    COMPONENT EVALUATION

    From the White Industries hubs and Sampson crankset to the compact Joe's brake levers and titanium American Classic seatpost, this Cat was a veritable swagfest of High-end doodads. Most excellent was the Marinovative "Cheap Trick" sidepull brake, which offered one-finger lockups and good modulation. It's a $50 option with the frame and one I'd recommend, since the Catamount has no provision for normal cantilever routing.

    No tire is perfect everywhere, but the bike's Onza Aggro front tread didn't cut it anywhere I rode. It became a fat brown slick in Colorado mud and washed out at the slightest provocation in New Mexico sand. But I've hear it's awesome on some fabled, possibly mythical surface called "hardpack," whatever that is.

  9. #9
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    Bicycling Magazine Review (1995)

    Bicycling

    Smooth Speed!

    by Geoff Drake, Jim Langley, Scott Martin, and Fred Matheny

    February 1995

    Catamount: MFS

    A fine example of the unified art.


    I'm the resident full-suspension curmudgeon on the BICYCLING staff. If double-barrel bounce is so great, why don't racers use it? When Henrik Djernis bags his 4th world championship this season on a Pro-Flex, I'll reconsider.

    The complexity of many designs offends my sense of aesthetics and practicality. Full-suspension rear triangles, replete with linkages and shock absorbers, often look built from an Erector Set. And in the Colorado mountains and Utah canyons where I normally ride, complexity breeds potentially life-threatening breakdowns far from civilization.

    But I have to admit that my fears where assuaged, if not completely laid to rest, by the Catamount MFS. It made Moab rock-garden descents fun, and its stable handling saved my skin on the Slickrock Trail. This is one-sweet bike--and it's American-made (heck, Colorado-made) right here in out-of-the-way Fort Collins.

    The Catamount's genesis demonstrates parallel evolution at work. Designer Scott Still independently conceived the unified rear triangle and kept written logs of its development for more than 2 years, not discovering until 1993 that John Castellano had a similar idea. Big surprise. (At this date Schwinn, Ibis, and Wilderness Trail Bikes have elected to follow Castellano's patent. Catamount, Trek, and Klein are producing unified designs independently.)

    Catamount president Larry Pastor says he's hoping his company can stay clear of the patent wars, maintaining that his design differs significantly from the Schwinn Homegrown. For starters, the Catamount's pivot is higher and more forward. Aesthetically, the frame has the most pleasing lines in our test group, comprising 2 simple triangles connected in the middle. It uses 6 tubes in the rear end while Schwinn uses 8. The Catamount--available as a frame only for $1,549--is minimalist. As a bonus, it avoids the chain slap that plagues the Schwinn.

    It isn't just a pretty face, either. This Cat purrs. In the 18-inch size, the top tube stretches to 23.3 inches, so on the ledged dropoffs of Moab's famed Flat Pass I didn't feel like I was going over the handlebar. And the front end stayed down while climbing on the Slickrock Trail at the limits of traction. Most Moab climbing requires a subtle front/rear balance to prevent unsightly bike flips (and hospitalization). The Catamount's long cockpit and 73-degree seat-tube angle made weight shifts a simple reflex. While descending brutal stairsteps and sand traps, the front end went right where I aimed it.

    Overall, the bike exhibited many of the same good traits as the Schwinn. Climbing was a treat because the design eliminates biopacing. When I rode seated on smooth California fire roads, the Catamount climbed like, well, a scared cat. When I stood, the rear end resembled that a hardtail. And I ceased to notice the constantly varying saddle height. The 2 bikes were also close in weight, with the Schwinn just a fraction of a pound lighter.

    One key difference is the Catamount's use of a Risse Elroy air-oil shock (rather than a Fox). While suspension action was good, we noticed an annoying top-out clunk. Rebound damping adjustments made a difference, but required as much as 30 turns of a small and almost inaccessible knob. Lastly, inflation was difficult, resulting in several bent needles. (The Fox uses a standard Schrader valve.)

    Our test bike included an Amp fork (picture), which we found too stiff and replaced with Halson. Catamount says the consumer frame/fork combo will probably include a Rock Shox Judy, Manitou 4, or a Halson.

    Several testers reported that the Paul's Crosstop 11 sidepull rear brake rubbed their right calves. Pastor promises that new frames will accommodate low-profile cantis to prevent this. And the single water bottle mount didn't cut it in Utah desert country. A CamelBak was mandatory.

    The bike has only one pivot, so theoretically there's less to go wrong. But in a graphic example of Murphy's Law, the through-pin slid sideways. Pastor says the solution is simple: They'll apply LocTite at the factory.

    Like its namesake, the Catamount loves to lead then land on its feet, thanks to the plush suspension. But you don't need to get big air to appreciate this bike's agility. For fast cruising in the rough stuff--plus occasional strategic hops over rocks and porcupines--the Catamount has just about the smoothest ride in the animal kingdom.

    --F.M.

  10. #10
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    Cats are great bikes and I sure rode piss out of mine. A little clarification is due though. They changed to steel sometime around 98 or so. It is my understanding that at that point that all fab was sourced overseas with painting and assembly happening here. The site was never updated to reflect that they were in fact no longer "handcrafted in Colorado". Though the steel versions were nice bikes the bike that Zap rode is not the bike that the majority of people are riding today. Mine was a second generation SL from 95". Frame and shock came in at just over 5 lbs for a large. Also note that the Cats were not considered Sweet Spot bikes. According to the designer, with a different pivot location they did not fall under the Sweet Spot patent. From my experience they handled better than any SS I rode. Less inch worm effect was the biggest improvement I found.

    Jeff
    Zip ties? Not on my bike!

    Want:
    650B rims or wheel set. 80's vintage 32 or 36 x 135mm

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    Quote Originally Posted by jeff
    Cats are great bikes and I sure rode piss out of mine. A little clarification is due though. They changed to steel sometime around 98 or so. It is my understanding that at that point that all fab was sourced overseas with painting and assembly happening here. The site was never updated to reflect that they were in fact no longer "handcrafted in Colorado". Though the steel versions were nice bikes the bike that Zap rode is not the bike that the majority of people are riding today. Mine was a second generation SL from 95". Frame and shock came in at just over 5 lbs for a large. Also note that the Cats were not considered Sweet Spot bikes. According to the designer, with a different pivot location they did not fall under the Sweet Spot patent. From my experience they handled better than any SS I rode. Less inch worm effect was the biggest improvement I found.

    Jeff
    Jeff,

    Thanks for adding and clarifying based on your first hand experience.
    I edited the original post to make note that the Cat is not a Sweet Spot bike.

    The newer Manitou Minute I have on my current Cat helps neutralize the inch worm effect significantly to the point where I don't really notice it anymore. I used to run a coil Marzocchi and that used to dive very easily.
    Last edited by Catamount Rider; 01-21-2010 at 09:29 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by chefmiguel
    I remember finding it a simpler design compared to the Szazbo and liked that about it. Never got a chance to ride one but I still own a h2o cage from the company.
    I still see those water bottle cages up on eBay.
    I should pick one up, would appropriately complete the bike.

    Photos Courtesy of eBay seller New Old Stock Bicycle Shop.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Catamount MFS thread-catcage_single_gray_01.jpg  

    Catamount MFS thread-catcage_packaging_01.jpg  

    Catamount MFS thread-catcage_packaging_02.jpg  


  13. #13
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    They came up with those as a way to solve the tight triangle problem. They work quite well. I was one of the original test dummies for the prototypes.
    Zip ties? Not on my bike!

    Want:
    650B rims or wheel set. 80's vintage 32 or 36 x 135mm

  14. #14
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    Rear disc brake adapter?

    Jeff,

    Since you know a bit about these Cats, do you remember what and how the rear disc brake adapter was mounted?

    I remember back then, the disc brake adapter mount was offered but I never actually saw one. For some reason I recall it fit a 140mm rotor only.

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    Sorry. No clue. I never saw one used. Hell the last time I rode mine was 2001.
    Zip ties? Not on my bike!

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    I didn't ride mine all last year though its also setup as a singlespeed. I never had a brake dive problem as I used a Noleen Crosslink fork and they've always resisted diving well, even without a platform valve.

    <img src="https://yoda.densan.ca/kmr/bikes/catss1.jpg">
    <img src="https://yoda.densan.ca/kmr/bikes/catss2.jpg">
    <img src="https://yoda.densan.ca/kmr/bikes/catss3.jpg">
    <img src="https://yoda.densan.ca/kmr/bikes/catss4.jpg">

    I was thinking about seliing it (either frame or setup as a geared bike) next season since I've ridden it maybe 10 times in four years, but more recently I've considered the possibility of setting it up as a travel bike since one the advantage to urt's is of course, you unbolt the shock and the whole drivetrain and swingarm can fold under the bike.
    I don't post to generate business for myself or make like I'm better than sliced bread

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    Quote Originally Posted by DeeEight
    I didn't ride mine all last year though its also setup as a singlespeed. I never had a brake dive problem as I used a Noleen Crosslink fork and they've always resisted diving well, even without a platform valve.

    ...more recently I've considered the possibility of setting it up as a travel bike since one the advantage to urt's is of course, you unbolt the shock and the whole drivetrain and swingarm can fold under the bike.
    Me too, my Cat has seen little dirt time in recent years, been store away since 2004/05. I remember those Noleen forks, I wanted one at the time because of their anti-dive design. Nice setup.

    Good idea for the Cat as semi folding traveling bike. I tried folding it today and it's not too bad. Not as compact as the La Pierre Passport bike, but definitely a viable option for a travel bike. My cable as they are run, need more housing slack to accommodate a fold. Or running detachable cables like the Ritchey Breakaways is a solution too.

    Taking out my Cat to the trails has been fun with the newer parts. Given new life into it, biggest difference being the SPV fork and riser bars with more sweep. My old setup was an Marzocchi coil 80mm fork and straight flat bars.

  18. #18
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    I'm not sure if I'd run the ritchey breakaways to do it or just use a rear brake with a barrel cable anchor that slips out of the arms (like Avid Tri-Align cantilevers do). Then I'd simply need slightly more SIS cable housing and that's not really gonna hurt the shifting performance like extra long brake housing would affect the rear brake.
    I don't post to generate business for myself or make like I'm better than sliced bread

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    Did Catamount License out design?

    Does anyone know if Catamount licensed out their frame design to Barracuda?

    This 1998 Barracuda Cudacat looks like a licensed Catamount frame to me.

    Photos courtesy of Retrobike member Slow6.
    He posted a thread about the bike on Retrobike here.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Catamount MFS thread-4255604331_809425f511_o.jpg  

    Catamount MFS thread-4255604333_2bef2b7fa6_o.jpg  


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    Built by Cat. for Barracuda. I think they built for a few others also.
    Zip ties? Not on my bike!

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    Old Catamount homepage

    Here is a screenshot of the old Catamount website homepage.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Catamount MFS thread-catamounthomepage.jpg  


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    MTB Magazine Review 1995

    MTB

    Catamount builds a bike for the bell curve

    by Jackson M. Lynch

    September 1995


    The bright yellow Catamount with its cougar's-paw head tube logo stared down at the trail as I glided through some bumpy tree-lined singletrack. The Batman fight scene "oofs," "biffs" and "zowies" which usually flow freely from my gob on rough trail rides were replaced by the subtle squish, squish sounds of the Fox Alps4R rear shock soaking up bumps and cosseting me from the terra assault I'd chosen for my first day aboard the Cat.

    Scott Still, the 29-year-old Catamount designer, had told me his Mid-Frame Suspension design was meant to be a comfortable all-around cross-country bike with plenty of moderately active rear travel (4 inches) and stable handling characteristics, the Catamount is meant to fall into the center of the rear-activity spectrum in most riding conditions.

    The Catamount story is so simple it almost seems unreal. Designer Still, a cyclist and liberal arts graduate of Colorado State University, wanted to get a job in the bike industry and had an idea for a suspension bike. After sending out numerous resumes and unsuccessfully trying to break into the business, Still decided to build the bike himself. "I'd always been real intrigued by the Slingshot (with it's hinged top tube and sprung down cable) and the first stuff I played around with was real similar to that, but I realized I didn't want my frame to splay like the Slingshot when it takes a hard downward pedal force, " Still related. "I thought moving the pivot to the middle of the frame would reduce the splaying action." Working through numerous scale models, a few aborted rideable prototypes and mounting credit card bills, Still ultimately arrived at the final design in the summer of 1994 and formed Catamount with partner Larry Pastor in August of that year.

    CAT CONSTRUCTION

    Catamount doesn't try any smoke and mirrors routine; the frame is straightforward, straight-gauge Alcoa 6061-T6 aluminum alloy with 7/8 inch square rear stays. Still claims the square stays make for a very rigid rear triangle, and to a degree, we couldn't argue with that. Although the Catamount felt more flexible in the rear than the Klein Mantra and Schwinn Homegrown XT.

    The pivot assembly also reflects Still's desire for simplicity. It combines two Garlock bushings, two plastic washers and the pivot pin. "I tried a few bearing assemblies, but it just didn't seem like a heavy bearing was the way to go since there is such a limited range of motion. And the Garlock bushings are great because they're very thin, they have got steel backing, don't need lubrication, they're light and durable," alleged Still. The large-diameter swing arm mounts attach to the pivot pin via four pinch bolts and look like the weak link in the system, but we haven't had any trouble with them so far.

    Unlike the rest of the URT crowd reviewed in this issue, the Catamount isn't meant to hang out on the fringes of the suspension spectrum. It isn't an exotic, boldless, finicky race steed, or an "excuse me, was that a rut,?" plushmobile. The Cat's middle of the road and, whether we're willing to admit it, that means it will probably please a lot of regular Joes who just want to go out for a pleasant trail excursion on a bike that's a happy medium between the juiced-up hyper-performance rig he craves and the comfortable machine that his body begs him to ride.

    Dan Wildhirt

    Six foot. Four inch, 190 lb. Sport racer.

    A great effort from a small builder that lacks the research and marketing budgets behind some of the others in this test. The Catamount's straightforward design struck me with it's competence in practically every area, with no particular vices to speak of. Handling, climbing and descending were all accomplished with aplomb. I didn't even mind the RST elastomer fork, unique to this group of bikes. The Chronometro hubs, though, seem like an answer to a question nobody asked. Sure they're clever, but truing the spokes means keeping yet another single-purpose wrench in my toolbox.

    Jackson M. Lynch

    Five foot. Eleven inch, 165 lb. Expert racer.

    This bike's performance was admirable. It didn't outshine the others in any category, but the Catamount did journeyman's work under all conditions. The mid frame pivot is a compromise between the always active VooDoo Canzo and somewhat active Schwinn Homegrown. The Cat slipped through single track sections gracefully, climbed well, with moderate rear wheel activity. The Marinovative rear brake was the most powerful of the bunch, facilitating easy one-finger rear wheel lockups. The straightforward and straight gauge 6061 alloy frame exhibited excellent lateral rigidity both front and rear.

    Eric Hagerman

    Six foot. Four inch, 175 lb. Sport racer.

  23. #23
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    I know it's a completely different frame design, but the new Energy Return Bike (ERB), is reminiscent the Catamount frame shape. Unlike the old Slingshots, the new ERB has it's "pivot" flex board in the mid section of the frame.

    Last edited by Catamount Rider; 01-25-2010 at 07:37 PM.

  24. #24
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    Couple more pics...

    A couple more pics of Cats found online...
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Catamount MFS thread-danmitchell-2-1.jpg  

    Catamount MFS thread-stellaridge-002.jpg  


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    Interesting eBay auction desc.

    Here's a rather strange eBay description of a Catamount MFS frame.

    Read the description from the screen shot below.

    I wonder what they meant by saying that the frame bosses needed to be moved to work with modern V-brakes? My Cat has been able to mount everything from Avids, Shimanos, to FMF bmx v-brakes.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Catamount MFS thread-overheated.jpg  


  26. #26
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    The ERB Bike is actually the latest slingshot if you consider its the new brand for the inventor of Slingshot bikes. He sold slingshot a few years ago (remember we had threads here at the time from the new owners announcing the updates to the slingshots, like easily replaceable fiber boards, and the new farmboy 29er model) and I guess he just couldn't stay out of bikes and came out with this new design which does more than just inchworm with a half inch of wheel travel as slingshots did. He probably had a non-compete clause with the original model design (the patent has long since expired) which explains why the fiber board on the new model is placed where it is.

    As to that ebay cat's description, the seller is apparently a moron. The cable routing and housing stop braze-ons go down the right downtube and the seller was apparently too stupid to just loop the housing for the V-brake from the right cable stop AROUND to the left. See the 1st, 3rd and 4th pics above of my catamount. The V-brake cable housing is the shimano XTR Grey SLR housing, and it stands out clearly going around the blue frame and shock to the left.
    Last edited by DeeEight; 01-26-2010 at 09:50 AM.
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    My rebuild...

    Here's my resurrected Catamount from the attic. Hasn't seen the light of day since 2004. Took down the frame and put it together with parts I had laying around and presto, a fun retro/modern rig.

    That's an 04 Manitou Minute set to 100mm, which is the tallest fork the old Catamount site recommended on the frame. It rides much better and less twitchy with the taller fork compared to the old 80mm I had on it. With the SPV platform up front, the bike has less inchworming when applying the front brake and I like that.

    I know the tires are bit too much flair, but those are the only 26" tires I had laying around (been riding 29er and cross bikes for the past 5 years). Got them free during some event years ago. They are actually good performing tires I have to say, great for my fireroad and hardpack trails in the desert, ride very similar to the WTB Nanoraptors 2.1. Plus, the add a bit of fun to the bike. Personally I think bikes should be fun.

    I originally retired the Cat back in 04 because I was getting into more aggressive riding and trails and eventually ended up with a Horst Link Turner Burner setup. Times have changed and I am now more mellow and ride just fireroads and sold the Burner. The Cat is actually now the idea bike for my fireroads and hardpack trails.

    I went with Sunrace thumbies for hassle-free shifting match up with an old XTR 952 rear der. The crankset is a newer RaceFace external cup bottom bracket setup. Basic Avid BB5 up front (take-offs from LBS). Rear shock is a Rock Shox Deluxe coil.

    Overall, I am happy with rediscovering my Cat in 2010. I never would have given much thought to it unless I saw that photo of John Castellano's new Zorro URT bike.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Catamount MFS thread-camo_cat10001.jpg  

    Catamount MFS thread-camo_cat10002.jpg  

    Last edited by Catamount Rider; 01-27-2010 at 06:11 PM.

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    Heatube Sticker Detail

    Headtube Cat...
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  29. #29
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    Same model year cat frame as mine, except you appear to have applied your decals (I left mine off), and you kept the stock rockshox coupe deluxe rear shock. I swapped mine out and replaced it with a SID XC shock which being an air shock is lighter and it also lets you adjust the negative spring pressure seperate from the main spring. I'll probably put the stock shock back if I sell it (which is looking likely now as I'm trying to raise my share of the startup capital to open a retail bike shop, and this is gonna requiring shrinking my bike fleet a bit).

  30. #30
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    I think my brother still has his. I'll see if he can post up some info or images.
    Authorities speculate that speed may have been a factor. They are also holding gravity and inertia for questioning.

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    Yeah, I still have mine. Trying to find pics of it now.

    I'm fairly sure I got mine in '94. It's full aluminum. I bought it as a complete bike from Catamount, with mostly Deore LX parts (cranks, hubs, FR, DR, BB). They put XT V-brakes on it, and I spec'd GripShift X-Rays (I detest RapidFire shifters). I chose a red main triangle and green rear triangle to kinda match the color scheme of my 7-Eleven Eddy Merckx. The colors aren't even close, but the idea is there. I'm considering having it repainted/powdercoated a different color.

    I've since modified it into a 1x8, with old 105 RD, Cronometro wheels (thanks, bro), Deore 7s thumbshifter, & a gaudy purple Rock Ring to keep the chain from dropping to the outside. Still have the original Rock Shox Judy fork in it, but I need to replace it. I should also send off the Fox Alps 4 rear shock to be rebuilt. I've also installed Specialized Fatboy 1.25s on it for street riding. I rarely go off road anymore, so they work great.

    In fact, I rarely ride it at all anymore, as I've been spending most of my time on my SS MTB. I think the last time I rode it was this past summer, when the cranks for the SS MTB were at the powder coater.

    I think this is the only pic I have of it in its current configuration:


    Here's the only pic I have of it prior to the 1x8 conversion:

    It has the Cronometro wheels on it. The stock Deore LX/Mavic wheels are on my SS MTB. I'm considering swapping freehub bodies between the two wheels and putting the Cronos on the SS, & the original wheels back on the Cat.

    I really liked how it rides. I just remembered that I once took it up to Wichita Falls and rode the full Century at the Hotter 'n Hell Hundred. I had slicks on it, of course, and the suspension sure helped on the rough roads. I think the second time I tried to ride it up there, I forgot my seatbag in the car and flatted at the 80 mile mark. I had to sag in because no one had a presta tube in a 26x1, and even the Boy Scout I saw didn't have a patch kit.
    M1: El Chupacabra full-rigid SS
    M2: Catamount MFS 1x8
    R1: Team 7-11 EddyMerckx
    R2: Colnago Super

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    Monogodo,

    Thanks for posting your Cat!

    Good to see a Cat still rolling 16 years later. You have one of the early all aluminum ones. +1 on the thumbies, I also detest trigger shifters.

    I put 1.5 slicks on mine last week and started riding it as a commuter too. Planning on doing a 50 mile road ride on it as soon as the rain clears out.

    Have you replaced the bushings any time in the 16 years you've ridden your Cat?

    My pivots are just fine and I bought a spare set of bushings that have been in my parts bin for years, never had the need yet.

    Nice profile photo btw. I have to get pic of my cat when he sits on the saddle.

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    I forgot all about my profile pic while I was posting earlier.

    And nope, never replaced the bushings. I've never had it apart.
    M1: El Chupacabra full-rigid SS
    M2: Catamount MFS 1x8
    R1: Team 7-11 EddyMerckx
    R2: Colnago Super

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    Quote Originally Posted by monogodo
    I forgot all about my profile pic while I was posting earlier.

    And nope, never replaced the bushings. I've never had it apart.
    Good to know the bushings are still doing their job 16 years later. One of my first impressions about the Cat when unboxing it was it's workmanship and sturdy build.

    I ride in here in dry S. California, so my bushings have been fine. No worries about water and mud bits getting in there to break them down.

  35. #35
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    Hey bro, what's it weigh? Pedal it up to RBM and see.
    Authorities speculate that speed may have been a factor. They are also holding gravity and inertia for questioning.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeff
    Sorry. No clue. I never saw one used. Hell the last time I rode mine was 2001.
    There has been a Cat showing up regularly on our local Craigslist for several weeks. Yours, Jeff?

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    This one has been in the Boulder Craigslist too.
    http://boulder.craigslist.org/bik/1546519347.html

  38. #38
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    OP's posts and PM's reminded me of my old Catamount, I last rode it a few months ago, where I endo'ed spectacularly trying to avoid a not-quite-in-control rider on a particularly steep technical skaff strewn decent.

    It's no longer Rohloff equiped like the picture posted by the OP, it's had a Sram Dual-Drive 3-speed IGH for a while now (and a 1999 SID - picture's old).

    Took it out on yesterday's night ride, had to get use to the tall BB again. Had a great near-perfect ride - but the others didn't do that well, several mechanicals, endos, crashes due to hidden ice, etc... just another typical winter night-ride!

  39. #39
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    Nope, not mine.

    Quote Originally Posted by sgltrak
    There has been a Cat showing up regularly on our local Craigslist for several weeks. Yours, Jeff?
    Mine was the black and Judy yellow one posted above,rear facing drops ect. Actually sold it, frame and fork, to Jaz's ex BF. Not the last ex but the one before.
    Zip ties? Not on my bike!

    Want:
    650B rims or wheel set. 80's vintage 32 or 36 x 135mm

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    Itsdoable,

    I like that setup. Very clever running that SRAM Dual Drive as strictly an internal hub with a clean chain line. Which rear fender is that?

    Also, thanks for your tips on installing a rear disc brake.

    Good to see some of these Cats still hitting the trails.

  41. #41
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    MTB cover

    Here's the cover photo of the above issue of MTB with the Cat as part of the URT write up.

    Photo courtesy of eBay seller "olligopoly"
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Catamount Rider
    I like that setup. Very clever running that SRAM Dual Drive as strictly an internal hub with a clean chain line. Which rear fender is that?
    At the time, it was the only 3-speed hub that came with disc mounts.

    The rear fender is from Woodman, had to use the canti posts for something.

  43. #43
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    Topeak used to have a rear fender called the Mud Defender, which mounted to a brake booster it came with. I have one in my collection and will probably stock some in my shop this spring. One of my distributor still has a hundred of them in stock. The plastic fender looks a lot like the Woodman one. They're a handy and simple way to mount them to bikes which still run brake posts.

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    I am going to try to track down one of these fenders that mount to the brake post. Great for keeping crude from the shock.

  45. #45
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    Since the wife and I moved last weekend, I get to pull all of my bikes out of storage and hang them on the wall. The last one to move is the Cat, which I'll be moving in 10-15 minutes. I'll have to take new pics very soon of it.
    M1: El Chupacabra full-rigid SS
    M2: Catamount MFS 1x8
    R1: Team 7-11 EddyMerckx
    R2: Colnago Super

  46. #46
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    It's not the best pic, but I do have a one that I took of it today:

    M1: El Chupacabra full-rigid SS
    M2: Catamount MFS 1x8
    R1: Team 7-11 EddyMerckx
    R2: Colnago Super

  47. #47
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    Nice rockring on the catamount... purple?

  48. #48
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    Yeah, it's purple. I needed something to keep the chain from dropping to the outside. It was the only one I could find that didn't cost an outrageous amount.
    M1: El Chupacabra full-rigid SS
    M2: Catamount MFS 1x8
    R1: Team 7-11 EddyMerckx
    R2: Colnago Super

  49. #49
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    Here's a better pic of the Catamount. A friend with a very nice camera came over and took the photo:


    Here's a link to the original size pic.
    M1: El Chupacabra full-rigid SS
    M2: Catamount MFS 1x8
    R1: Team 7-11 EddyMerckx
    R2: Colnago Super

  50. #50
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    Found an old pic of me riding the Catamount at the Hotter 'n Hell Hundred. Not sure what year it was.

    M1: El Chupacabra full-rigid SS
    M2: Catamount MFS 1x8
    R1: Team 7-11 EddyMerckx
    R2: Colnago Super

  51. #51
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    I used to own the yellow Catamount frame that Larry used in his adverts/website. I built it up in '98 & rode it until 2001 when I purchased a "powder blue" MFS frame from Larry, likely one of his last (?) which I still own but sadly have hardly used..it's like a brand new bike! See my members gallery for photos....The blue MFS is mostly XTR except for the BB, Chris King headset, retro Ringle hubs, Raceface crank set etc....

    Kind regards,

    Paul.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Catamount MFS thread-bike_1.jpg  

    Catamount MFS thread-bike_2.jpg  

    Attached Images Attached Images    

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    Just getting the hang of posting images, will post some directly to the thread tomorrow...

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    Anyone looking for a frame?

    Hi,

    I have a MFS frame that I bought from Cambria and built up a number of years ago. I have ridden it very infrequently. If anyone is interested in buying a frame - I'm willing to sell. I just don't use it enough.

  54. #54
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    Sorry to dig up an old thread but I've been thinking quite a bit about my catamount recently and found this thread while searching for pics.

    Quote Originally Posted by jeff
    Mine was the black and Judy yellow one posted above,rear facing drops ect. Actually sold it, frame and fork, to Jaz's ex BF. Not the last ex but the one before.
    It's still in good hands. I'll be converting it into a fixed gear, drop bar, winter commuter this fall. I'm pretty excited about it.

  55. #55
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    Great to hear Matt. Show it the love.
    Zip ties? Not on my bike!

    Want:
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    just bourght a cat frame on ebay, wanted to know what type and size of bottom bracket I will need. also any type of bb you would recommend, will post pictures of the build.

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    Oh how wonderful, I also rebuilt my older Catamount and tricked it out with the latest and greatest everything. I won many great CC races on her and then put her to pasture for ten years, finally getting her out and repainting and rebuilding her to perfection. Mine is purple and yellow, the colors of my old race team with Northwest cycling club in Houston. ( I was team captain back in the day! )



    Quote Originally Posted by Catamount Rider View Post


    New here to this forum.

    Thought I start a thread for any Catamount MFS riders out there, myself included. I know some may say it's not quite vintage yet, but it's way to ancient to post in any other forum

    I recently rebuilt mine with some updated parts and will post pics as soon as I am done.

    Sweet Spot bikes tended to nose dive when applying the only the front brake. I installed a spare Manitou Minute 100 I had laying around and found that the SPV platform helps out tremendously with reducing the nose dive. I recommend it to any one out there on a Cat or similar (Szazbo, Schwinn S10, Mantra, etc).
    EDIT: Jeff clarified that the Catamount is not a Sweet Spot bike.

    Mine has been relegated to hanging in the attic for years. Then recently I saw that John Castellano has released an updated Sweet Spot bike called the Zorro. This gave me the idea to rebuild my Cat.

    With SPV fork, the Cat now rides very well I think. Mind you, it's best for just fireroads, slick rock and smoother single track.

    Let's see those Catamounts for the few of us still riding one.


  58. #58
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    Gail Spann's Catamount, rebuilt.

    Love this bike, it helped me to win many a race!
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Catamount MFS thread-dsc_0083.jpg  


  59. #59
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    I ride a ControlTech bike and it's geometry is very similar. Very comfy bikes- these sweet spot/URT bikes are.

  60. #60
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    Catamount MFS thread-mms_picture-3-.jpg Scott Still's personal bike.
    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee
    Better suited to non-aggressive 125# gals named Russell.
    I ride so slow, your Garmin will shut off.

  61. #61
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    Scott from Catamount?
    Zip ties? Not on my bike!

    Want:
    650B rims or wheel set. 80's vintage 32 or 36 x 135mm

  62. #62
    Schipperkes are cool.
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    Quote Originally Posted by jeff View Post
    Scott from Catamount?
    Scott Still, the guy that invented the Cat cage. That frame is a '94
    Quote Originally Posted by mikesee
    Better suited to non-aggressive 125# gals named Russell.
    I ride so slow, your Garmin will shut off.

  63. #63
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    Yep. I knew him and was around when the protos were going out for test. My frame was a 94 also. Great riding bike.
    Zip ties? Not on my bike!

    Want:
    650B rims or wheel set. 80's vintage 32 or 36 x 135mm

  64. #64
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    1998? Catamount

    I just revived one. I live in Boulder and found a frame on ebay and thought it would be fun to put it together considering it came from here (well Fort Collins is up the street). It is surprisingly good! It is a bit big for me and I put a small stem on it. I took it on my favorite loop and I didn't die. https://

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