American Steeplejack; old-school brakes- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    American Steeplejack; old-school brakes

    hey all,
    does anyone out there remember american steeplejack, with the 26-24 setup? if anyone knows where to find any pics online, that would be really cool. any pics of other late 80's early 90's tight-geometry woods bikes like EWR would be great, too.
    anyway, here's something to check out: http://www.blackbirdsf.org/brake_obscura/
    a site i had some involvement in. the only thing i miss on this page is the cannondale force 40 cable hanger.
    tim

  2. #2
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    More old brakes

    Plus a bit of remembrance of tight geo bikes from back in the day.

    No memory here of the American Steeplejack but I did own a Cannondale SM 400 which had a 26/24 setup. PITA bike though, no 24" tire availability other than the stock center tread issue which I remember hacking into chunks with a razor blade...ripped the rear derailleur off twice and the hanger along with it the second time and got a replacement frame from C and got rid of it. No real advantage to that system then or now IMHO.

    Of course you have to add Gary Fishers 15.5 chainstay bike of which I can't remember the moniker of, Montare or something like that and the all time cool "Shorty" hand made and ridden all over and back again by Don McClung among others. Featured the early a"head"set top pipe too....

    Here are a few brakes of note to gaze upon. Deore canti's that came with braze-ons included in the box and a set of Campy Euclid monoplaners with elephantine levers. The Deores came from the final storage box sale of Murdoch and the Campys from a long ago pink sheet from a wholesaler in the Chicago area.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  3. #3
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    hey bigwheel,
    what's this don mcclung bike, and the special headset? educate me.
    i have heard the name montare before, can't place it though.
    as for tight geometries in general, let's not forget what was probably the best-known of them all: the american M16.
    when i was studying in florida there was a guy in town who made frames with 24" wheels front and rear, he made a few of his own suspension forks, but most people just ran manitou 1s modified for 24" usage (tap the brake lugs off, saw the leg down an inch, reglue the lug back on). he also had some cool manitou mods- long, cnc'd and internally tapered sleeves to stick down the stanchions, which reinforced the crown area a lot. cool bikes, just too quirky. i was actually in gainesville, not far from newberry (an even shabbier little town than gainesville itself, if that is possible) where arrow racing was located. before gus from arrow moved out west this other guy started building his own bikes.
    check out this link:
    www.geocities.com/pinchflatdotcom
    go and check out the article on the warlock 26-24 bike, it has some decent pics and the story of the frames.
    tim

  4. #4
    paintbucket
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    Quote Originally Posted by uphiller
    i was actually in gainesville
    I was in gradual school at UF from 84-92. I wonder if that's why your name sounds familiar. I was almost entirely a roadie though.
    When the going gets weird its bedtime.

  5. #5
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    hey wooglin,
    i was in gainesville from 1998 to 2003, studied history and german. when did you leave? my brother studied there, too- from i guess 1994 to 1999.
    my real name is tim sexton, when i was there i rode a butt-ugly pink and navy blue khs team, then a litespeed obed.
    i assume you know the framebuilder character i am referring to, and that you saw some of the stuff he could do on a bike? crazy stuff, man, no-handed manuals across heavily-trafficked streets while opening a can of yoohoo, no-handed manuals cruising down the street, letting the parking meters smack the bar, then him backhanding the bar back into place just before the next parking meter came up, etc.
    tim

  6. #6

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    Nope. No overlap at all. I left a good 5 years before you showed up. I was in anthropology. Don't remember seeing the framebuilder guy either, and I'd definitely remember that.

    Kinda miss that place sometimes, but not often.

  7. #7
    Shreddin the Cul de Sac
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    C'dale

    [QUOTENo memory here of the American Steeplejack but I did own a Cannondale SM 400 which had a 26/24 setup. PITA bike though, no 24" tire availability other than the stock center tread issue which I remember hacking into chunks with a razor blade...ripped the rear derailleur off twice and the hanger along with it the second time and got a replacement frame from C and got rid of it. No real advantage to that system then or now IMHO[/QUOTE]

    And didn't C'dale continue with a 26/26 "Beast of the East"? High BB, shorter stays?
    I remember wanting one of those so bad!
    keep moving

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Burpee
    [QUOTENo memory here of the American Steeplejack but I did own a Cannondale SM 400 which had a 26/24 setup. PITA bike though, no 24" tire availability other than the stock center tread issue which I remember hacking into chunks with a razor blade...ripped the rear derailleur off twice and the hanger along with it the second time and got a replacement frame from C and got rid of it. No real advantage to that system then or now IMHO
    And didn't C'dale continue with a 26/26 "Beast of the East"? High BB, shorter stays?
    I remember wanting one of those so bad![/QUOTE]

    actually, the beast of the east 26-26 had a 13" bb height, well above the normal 11.75", but its stays were the standard 16.75", maybe longer, but definitely not shorter. the bike was advertised as being suitable for trials, but i guess trials back then was not half as abusive as what gets done today. still a fun backwoods bike with good tire clearance.
    oh- and i have seen one of the old cannondale 26-24s in person, the rear end seemed to be abnormally long, possibly just an optical illusion caused by the small wheel.
    tim

  9. #9

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    AMERICAN STEEPLEJACK
    I came across this bike about 4 years ago. I delieve this frame is #16 made.
    I can email pics
    thanks
    buckwild

  10. #10

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    American steeplejack

    Pic's

  11. #11

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    American Steeplejack

    pic's again

  12. #12
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    Where???????????

  13. #13

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    american steeplejack

    I tried to post pics. I can email them to you.

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