80's Rockhopper vs Stumpjumper frames- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    80's Rockhopper vs Stumpjumper frames

    88 Rockhopper Comp and the base 88 Stumpjumper have almost identical components. I'm curious about the differences between the frames and forks. They are both listed as Cro-Mo DB. I can't see much difference between my blue/white Rockhopper and the red/white stumpjumper.

    Does anyone have additional info?

  2. #2
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    Here's a scan from the early mountain bike bible, Mountain Bike Specialist, 1988 catalog describing the frames you mention. The descriptions & specs are the same, but it doesn't say they are, in fact, the same frame.

    Hope this helps.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 80's Rockhopper vs Stumpjumper frames-mbs_88_spec.jpg  

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  3. #3
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    Nice info Dude! Thanks.

    I bet it's the same exact frame and fork on both bikes. Am I right? Just more sizes avalible in the stumpy.

    I'm going to powder coat my umm.... stumphopper err... rockjumper. Now I wonder if I should go red/white, make it worth at least $50? more on CL.

    Are the original stumpy decals available anywhere?

  4. #4
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    I was wrenching in a Specialized dealer that year, for what it's worth they always seemed like the same frame to me. (Not exactly conclusive I know ...)

    It was comical at times watching people decide between the better parts on the Stumpy, and the not-unacceptable color combination on the Rockhopper. More often than not aesthetics won out, and several potential Stumpjumper buyers rode out on Rockhoppers because they didn't like the "easter basket" color palette.
    Don't call it a gooseneck.

  5. #5
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    pink and green now that is pimp

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jak0zilla
    I was wrenching in a Specialized dealer that year, for what it's worth they always seemed like the same frame to me. (Not exactly conclusive I know ...)

    It was comical at times watching people decide between the better parts on the Stumpy, and the not-unacceptable color combination on the Rockhopper. More often than not aesthetics won out, and several potential Stumpjumper buyers rode out on Rockhoppers because they didn't like the "easter basket" color palette.
    Jak0zilla,

    How do those frames rate in your opinion? Is it worth the $150 for new paint or should I leave it alone and spend my money for a upgrade frame/fork. I like the rigid frame and fork. Any recomendations?

  7. #7
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    IMHO, they're ok. It's certainly a nice sturdy rideable frame. Nothing to sneeze at. I'm not sure I'd spend that much to paint one unless I was sure that I like the ride.

    If it was me, I'd give it a rattle-can job and let it earn a nice paint job by proving itself for a couple of hundred miles.

    That said, it's not unreasonable to fix it up if you like it.
    Don't call it a gooseneck.

  8. #8
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    Lame to plaster some stumpjumper decals on a rockhopper.

  9. #9
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    Was that the plan? I agree if so. If it was me, i'd just have it decalled to say "Specialized", if even that, were I to pay for a pro respray.

    But, it is not my bike ... so who cares what I say?

    If you want an 80's Stumpjumper, just watch your local CL. There were a lot of those made, I'd bet you can pick one up (eventually) for what you're willing to pay to repaint this one. If you're obsessive-compulsive enough about searching you will find what you want for what you're willing to pay.
    Don't call it a gooseneck.

  10. #10
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    Very true, I got my blue/white 88 rockhopper comp on CL. I'm in the Bay Area and I was negotiating with a guy for a red/white 88 stumpy. It was in mint condition and like you pointed out, I just prefered the red and white color.

    I was lucky. No offense intended, but some people can't negotiate. I offered the guy full price and he had to think about it before he gave me an answer. This was a seller in the northeast part of the country. In the mean time I continue shopping and find a bike locally for 1/3 what I offered on the stumpy. Now I find out that the bikes are identical except for the color and name?

    Priceless!

  11. #11
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    My first MTB was the red/white 88 Stumpy. Other than the evil chainstay mounted u-break and the too short for me top tube, it was OK.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by dundundata
    pink and green now that is pimp
    We called them 'pepto and prell' back then. Actually not all of them, just the one belonging to a friend of ours.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by outside!
    My first MTB was the red/white 88 Stumpy. Other than the evil chainstay mounted u-break and the too short for me top tube, it was OK.
    I seem to have avoided both those problems. The stem on my bike has at least 130 reach, not like those shown in the catalog pics, and no chainstay brake. I always wondered how well those worked.

    Curious, would you want an old 80's stumpy if you got one sized right and w/o the bad brake setup?

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by El Sapo Rojo
    I seem to have avoided both those problems. The stem on my bike has at least 130 reach, not like those shown in the catalog pics, and no chainstay brake. I always wondered how well those worked.

    Curious, would you want an old 80's stumpy if you got one sized right and w/o the bad brake setup?
    I was referring to the top tube length, not the stem length. The later bikes have a longer top tube. The u-brake worked great, but was difficult too adjust and hard to keep clean. You also had to be careful not to skin your knuckles on the chainrings when opening the brake to remove the rear wheel.

    The old stumpies are fine bikes, but my tastes in hardtails generally involves titanium now. My rider is full squish now that I am old and fat.

  15. #15
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    U Brakes

    Quote Originally Posted by El Sapo Rojo View Post
    I seem to have avoided both those problems. The stem on my bike has at least 130 reach, not like those shown in the catalog pics, and no chainstay brake. I always wondered how well those worked.

    Curious, would you want an old 80's stumpy if you got one sized right and w/o the bad brake setup?
    The U brake under the chain stay works awesome. Much more powerful than cantis. If you rode in thick mud, they could clog up but you shouldn't be riding when the trails are wet and muddy, it ruins the trails.

  16. #16
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    I paid attention to the Rockhopper Comps and Stumpjumpers from 1988 to 1992, and those two bikes always looked to have identical frames to me. The difference was the components. Stumpjumpers got a wheel upgrade, like GX26 double wall rims instead of GX28 single wall on the R'Hopper one year. Also the Stumps got more branded parts, seatpost, saddle, stem, etc.

  17. #17
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    So, to extend this discussion to it's logical conclusion, is there similarities with the Hardrock frame too? Were Specialized models really just trim levels?
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  18. #18
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    In the 90's I thought the Stumpjumper steel used Tange Prestige tubing, while the Rockhopper used the Tange Cro-Mo DB tube set. I also thought some of the Stumpies were made in Japan, versus Taiwan for the Rockhopper.
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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vespasianus View Post
    In the 90's I thought the Stumpjumper steel used Tange Prestige tubing, while the Rockhopper used the Tange Cro-Mo DB tube set. I also thought some of the Stumpies were made in Japan, versus Taiwan for the Rockhopper.
    Stumpjumper Comp got the Prestige tubing, IIRC, plus the XT group. Stump' Team models had some relationship to Ibis around '87-'88, lugged, maybe that was the JP connection.

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