100,000 Mile Mountaineer- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    100,000 Mile Mountaineer

    Maybe just on the edge of vintage...either way, you might enjoy. Haven't seen too many Curtlos on this board...

    After six computers, three forks, five sets of wheels and countless other replacements - the ODO on computer number six rolled over to 10,000. This brings the total number of miles on this frame to 100,018.

    Purchased in April, 1995. Mechanic pro-deal, frame and Answer Accu-Trac fork: $750. Replaced an AMP Research B-2

    Over ten years as a mechanic and after riding and racing thousands of bikes - this is still the nicest bike I've ever ridden.

    The set-up:

    1995 Curtlo Advanced Mountaineer. Tru-Temper Double Butted OX3. Fillet brazed, 17.5" w/ 1 1/4 steerer tube.

    1996 Rock Shox Judy XC - White Industries body and springs + LT kit. Ti hardware throughout.

    Chris King headset. Threaded.

    1993 Cook Bros. Racing. RSR Custom Cut 177.5mm - Synchros Sealed Ti BB. Cook Bros. Chainrings.

    Sun Zero Degree XC 32h - Phil Wood Hi-Flange w/ Control Tech Ti Skewers. Radial front, three cross rear.

    1996 XTR Rear D. LX front. Sealed Ti Pulleys.

    1996 XTR Cantilevers. XTR shoes in front, Ritchey pads in rear.

    Custom, one-off Alpinestars Titanium 1 1/4" quilled stem. Custom cut oversized DIA alpinestars bars. Control Tech bar ends.

    1997 Grip-Shift X-Ray 800, Dia Compe 7's.

    DX downhill/737 pedals.

    American Classic 750mm Single Bolt post w/ ultra-rare kevlar/vinyl 'Crate' Schwinn seat with Ti rails.

    Weight as is: 21.3 pounds.

    Weight with Answer fork: A shade over 19 pounds.

    It's going back up to Winthrop for a re-spray, meanwhile I'll be placing an order for his FS version - same color, same specs. Currently restoring my old Amp B-2 to ride in the meantime.







    Last edited by mountaineer_2112; 05-04-2010 at 08:52 PM.

  2. #2
    gobsmacked Moderator
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    Love It!! Thanks For Posting!

  3. #3
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    You realize how lucky you are to have found a bike that you enjoy like this.

    Thanks for sharing. Good stuff!
    -eric-

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    Wanted: NDS Suntour XC Pro Microdrive 175mm Crank Arm.

  4. #4
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    Great looking bike......like the rear drop out.
    Too many bikes, and just enough time to ride them.

  5. #5
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    Agreed---super sweet. I really dig Curtlos. Did those Cooks last you all 100,000 miles?
    Somec is like the digital Zunow
    And this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JD5h3y0a9AU

  6. #6
    used to be uno-speedo....
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    that bike is far to nice to post on vrc ;-)

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by yo-Nate-y
    Agreed---super sweet. I really dig Curtlos. Did those Cooks last you all 100,000 miles?
    Those came on the scene in about 1999. I pulled them off my B-2 after the original Syncros cranks were mysteriously cross-threaded beyond repair.

    They have zero taper wear and aside from one of the inner chainring threads being stripped, they are mint.

  8. #8
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    Nice bike and great story. Out of curiosity, which (if any) of the parts on the bike lasted the whole 100k?... as that would be quite a reliability testament.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by halaburt
    Nice bike and great story. Out of curiosity, which (if any) of the parts on the bike lasted the whole 100k?... as that would be quite a reliability testament.
    The frame, the seat post, the bar and the stem. Everything else has been replaced. The wheel set that lasted the longest was the ceramic 217's with nuke proof hubs. Although I suspect these Phil Woods are the last hubs I'll ever buy.

    The frame decals are the third set. Doug Curtis, well known for legendary frames, provides notoriously thin decals that scratch if you look at them wrong.

  10. #10
    gobsmacked Moderator
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    Why the repaint? The frame looks to be in pretty good shape.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by sfgirlonbike
    Why the repaint? The frame looks to be in pretty good shape.
    The chainstay has been nibbled on at the BB by the chain and the downtube has a few pits from various fire road pack descents. Plus, powdercoat tends to get this weird haze after a few years and it fades; the tops of the tubes are slightly lighter than the bottoms.

    Also, Curtlo does more than respray - it's glass blasted and the brazes are thoroughly inspected - then dipped and recoated. Before it's packed up, it's put on a frame table and re-aligned if need be.

    The problem, is the wait. One man - in the woods in Washington. Respray is around 2 months, door to door. The estimate for my Curtlo FS is close to 7 months for the build AFTER I get fitted for it....

  12. #12
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    Cool story and a cool bike. You're right Curtlos don't turn up here often, but when they do they seem to be highly regarded. Just curious, with the 1-1/4" head tube, was it set up to run the Action-Tec fork?
    Need: McMahon brake for roller cam mounts, Mountain Goat fork.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by muddybuddy
    Cool story and a cool bike. You're right Curtlos don't turn up here often, but when they do they seem to be highly regarded. Just curious, with the 1-1/4" head tube, was it set up to run the Action-Tec fork?
    Thanks! Actually, the bike was built initially with an Answer Accu-Trax straight blade unicorn fork. But with that fork, with radial front and a 1/25 steerer - it's a bit brutal.

    The Judy on there now is set to sag at the designed head tube angle with weight on the bike...between 175-190.

  14. #14
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    very cool to see another person that loves his Curtlo as much as i do. i would never get rid of my 1992 model. mine was raced for two hard seasons and then used quite a bit ever since retiring it from racing. i have no idea who many miles are on it but i too have replaced a lot of my original parts. i will say though that im still on the original wheels. i avoid mud so the Mavic M231 rims have lasted although the aluminum nipples have been seized for 15 years now. the first generation Nuke Proof hubs have been flawless too so far. anyway, cool bike and consider yourself lucky for finding a bike so special early on. most mountain bikers never find that one special bike.

  15. #15
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    "Weight as is: 21.3 pounds.

    Weight with Answer fork: A shade over 19 pounds."

    Steel is too heavy, you need carbon fiber......

    Nice ride, and yeah, those drop outs are pretty cool
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

    - FrostyStruthers



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  16. #16
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    Great bike, great story, I wish I wasn't so fickle that I can't hold onto a bike for more that 18 months..........

  17. #17
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    Beautiful. Got to love worn out parts AND parts that refuse to be worn out!

    The '95 and up to '99 vintage is quickly becoming my favorite. Maybe my recent purchase of a '95 I.F. Deluxe with all mid-90's part (still mint) has something do with it?

    Steel will always be real.

  18. #18
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    Makes me want an Action-Tec Curtlo.
    -eric-

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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith
    "Weight as is: 21.3 pounds.

    Weight with Answer fork: A shade over 19 pounds."

    Steel is too heavy, you need carbon fiber......

    Nice ride, and yeah, those drop outs are pretty cool
    I know a guy with a 17" OX Platinum Mountaineer with a SID fork and nearly a full Paul's set-up (brakes, hubs, der) - his bike is just a hair over 17.5 pounds.

    I could easily drop a pound if I got rid of those Phil Wood's (Little Bricks)...but really, what is the upgrade from a Phil Wood hub?

    Nothing. Although, perhaps if the cassette didn't sound like an AK-47....

  20. #20
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    Great looking bike. Not a huge fan of red, but this one pulls it off nicely.

    And you must have weighed it w/out those pedals because I think those alone are 13.2 lbs.

    Pretty light numbers you're getting with those parts and frame. I'm guessing your frame is 4.25+ lbs so that would be a 17lb build kit which is not easy to do even with modern stuff. Yes, I had a bit of the weight weenie bug back when I was racing.

  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fillet-brazed
    Great looking bike. Not a huge fan of red, but this one pulls it off nicely.

    And you must have weighed it w/out those pedals because I think those alone are 13.2 lbs.

    Pretty light numbers you're getting with those parts and frame. I'm guessing your frame is 4.25+ lbs so that would be a 17lb build kit which is not easy to do even with modern stuff. Yes, I had a bit of the weight weenie bug back when I was racing.
    A 17.5" Mountaineer with OX3 is 3.4 pounds (or 1556 grams). I specified a very long top tube and a 1 1/4 steerer, so that put me over a bit as well. The new OX Platinum frames, in 17.5, are just a hair over 3.2.

    When I was at UBI in like '96, I built a Reynolds HT with the same dimensions, as far as I remember, it was a sub 4 lb frame - it was brazed. I also snapped off the head tube about 100 miles into the frame life because brazing is apparently harder than it seems.

  22. #22
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    Cool bike and great story. Doesn't the 100,000+ miles on the same set of handlebars make you a little nervous though?

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by mountaineer_2112
    A 17.5" Mountaineer with OX3 is 3.4 pounds (or 1556 grams). I specified a very long top tube and a 1 1/4 steerer, so that put me over a bit as well. The new OX Platinum frames, in 17.5, are just a hair over 3.2.

    When I was at UBI in like '96, I built a Reynolds HT with the same dimensions, as far as I remember, it was a sub 4 lb frame - it was brazed. I also snapped off the head tube about 100 miles into the frame life because brazing is apparently harder than it seems.

    Pretty darn light for steel, especially to last that long. That's lighter than ti and lots of aluminum frames of the same vintage. But it certainly can be done with ultra thin tubes and smaller diameters. The paint though gets you since it's worth about a quarter pound, whereas ti needs no paint and aluminum can be anodized.

    The Phoenix with OS Logic Prestige is 4.3lbs just as a reference. Is the OX stuff that much thinner than Prestige to take a whole pound off the frame?
    Last edited by Fillet-brazed; 05-04-2010 at 11:19 AM.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by sho220
    Cool bike and great story. Doesn't the 100,000+ miles on the same set of handlebars make you a little nervous though?
    Not as much as the stem! That stem is one of five Titanium 1 1/4" quilled stems from A-stars - but built by some offshoot in Colorado in about 1994. Three of them broke and two were recalled - this is one of the two. The other one resides (or did) in Ashland, Oregon.

    The reason I went with this stem, is that it is EXACTLY the size stem that was fit-kitted for me on this bike - also I was a poor college student and mechanic - so I raided the "DO NOT USE THESE PARTS" drawer.

    There is a highly suspicious line along the bead of the bar clamp - but these were known to snap at the steerer junction. Who knows.

    Keeping my eyes peeled for an Answer A-Tac in white or black.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fillet-brazed
    Pretty darn light for steel, especially to last that long. That's lighter than ti and lots of aluminum frames of the same vintage. But it certainly can be done with ultra thin tubes and smaller diameters. The paint though gets you since it's worth about a quarter pound.

    The Phoenix with OS Logic Prestige is 4.3lbs just as a reference. Is the OX stuff that much thinner than Prestige to take a whole pound off the frame?
    I'm not familiar with that bike - but if I could guess, I would venture that it's tig-welded. With that being said, brazing a frame allows not only for much thinner tubesets (less wall thickness needed to build a bead) but the brazing makes for a lighter and stronger joint - and about half the heat required than to actually weld. These tubes never got above 800-1000 degrees in the build process, where as TIG bikes get closer to around 1600-1800. If you look at the head tube, you can see additional support at the top and bottom; this is because the tube is so thin, pressing a cup in would likely split the tube.

    Same with lugs - you can use exceptionally thin tubing because you don't need the meat for a big ugly weld - but the lug sets weigh a bit. TIG is the dominant build method because it's cheap - not because it's good.

    Another plus side to brazing - no vent holes at the junctions. Zero internal corrosion concerns.

    Without a doubt, this is a "Do Not Clamp The Seat Tube" bike. I learned this valuable lesson with a customers Masi my first week as a wrench.

    And you're right about paint - early to mid nineties Curtlos are powder-coated with what appears to be house paint - it's VERY thick. I would not doubt for a second this is nearly a 1/4 pound weight gain.
    Last edited by mountaineer_2112; 05-04-2010 at 02:43 PM.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by mountaineer_2112
    I'm not familiar with that bike - but if I could guess, I would venture that it's tig-welded. With that being said, brazing a frame allows not only for much thinner tubesets (less wall thickness needed to build a bead) but the brazing makes for a lighter and stronger joint - and about half the heat required than to actually weld. These tubes never got above 800-1000 degrees in the build process, where as TIG bikes get closer to around 1600-1800. If you look at the head tube, you can see additional support at the top and bottom; this is because the tube is so thin, pressing a cup in would likely split the tube.

    Same with lugs - you can use exceptionally thin tubing because you don't need the meat for a big ugly weld - but the lug sets weigh a bit. TIG is the dominant build method because it's cheap - not because it's good.

    Another plus side to brazing - no vent holes at the junctions. Zero internal corrosion concerns.

    Without a doubt, this is a "Do Not Clamp The Seat Tube" bike. I learned this valuable lesson with a customers Masi my first week as a wrench.

    And you're right about paint - early to mid nineties Curtlos are powder-coated with what appears to be house paint - it's VERY thick. I would not doubt for a second this is nearly a 1/4 pound weight gain.
    There's been a lot of talk about TIG vs brazing and I think the latest is that TIG is in fact a stronger junction even with the extra heat. I don't know for sure if your statements would hold up in the frame building forum. Ritchey developed Logic tubing specifically for TIG welding and made for an even lighter frame than the same version of his fillet-brazed bikes. But you are right about fillet brazing being much more time consuming.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fillet-brazed
    There's been a lot of talk about TIG vs brazing and I think the latest is that TIG is in fact a stronger junction even with the extra heat. I don't know for sure if your statements would hold up in the frame building forum. Ritchey developed Logic tubing specifically for TIG welding and made for an even lighter frame than the same version of his fillet-brazed bikes. But you are right about fillet brazing being much more time consuming.
    It's kind of a shady area. A braze unquestionably creates a less pinpointed stress point when properly done - versus a weld, were talking about 5-8 millimeters against a TIG beads 2-4. This is what makes it stronger. Since there is no point in creating a joint stronger that the actual material being joined, this in turn makes "brazing" a more structurally sound joint.

    Real world tests done by Columbus tubing showed TIG'ed steel tubes beginning to tear at stress points under the same load that a properly brazed joint held up to just fine. It's a matter of force distribution more than strength really.

    Logically yes, melting two similar metals together to form a bond is stronger than a using a filler metal - but not in all circumstances - and especially not in the presence of thin walled metals. Would I ask for a roll bar to be brazed? No, because wall thickness is plenty - but when it's about as thick as credit card, I'd like low heat and extremely high tolerances under the eye of an expert craftsman. A machine cant see the flux bubble it left under your head tube...but you might. Later. On the trail.

    I have a hint of experience here, perhaps the frame building forum calls:

    96' Lugged/Brazing Cert @ UBI
    96' TIG Cert @ UBI
    97' Ti/TIG @ UBI

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by mountaineer_2112
    It's kind of a shady area. A braze unquestionably creates a less pinpointed stress point when properly done - versus a weld, were talking about 5-8 millimeters against a TIG beads 2-4. This is what makes it stronger. Since there is no point in creating a joint stronger that the actual material being joined, this in turn makes "brazing" a more structurally sound joint.

    Real world tests done by Columbus tubing showed TIG'ed steel tubes beginning to tear at stress points under the same load that a properly brazed joint held up to just fine. It's a matter of force distribution more than strength really.

    Logically yes, melting two similar metals together to form a bond is stronger than a using a filler metal - but not in all circumstances - and especially not in the presence of thin walled metals. Would I ask for a roll bar to be brazed? No, because wall thickness is plenty - but when it's about as thick as credit card, I'd like low heat and extremely high tolerances under the eye of an expert craftsman. A machine cant see the flux bubble it left under your head tube...but you might. Later. On the trail.

    I have a hint of experience here, perhaps the frame building forum calls:

    96' Lugged/Brazing Cert @ UBI
    96' TIG Cert @ UBI
    97' Ti/TIG @ UBI
    Those UBI classes would probably be fun. There is lots of debate it seems. Here's the first thing I pulled up in a search stating that a fillet brazed frame has a quarter pound hit over the same TIG'd frame... but doesn't mention anything about a brazed frame allowing thinner tubes. I think that was the whole point of Logic Prestige tubing - a really short butt, just enough for a TIG weld. But I'm no metal joinery expert.

    http://www.gtgtandems.com/tech/brazing.html

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fillet-brazed
    Those UBI classes would probably be fun. There is lots of debate it seems. Here's the first thing I pulled up in a search stating that a fillet brazed frame has a quarter pound hit over the same TIG'd frame... but doesn't mention anything about a brazed frame allowing thinner tubes. I think that was the whole point of Logic Prestige tubing - a really short butt, just enough for a TIG weld. But I'm no metal joinery expert.

    http://www.gtgtandems.com/tech/brazing.html
    Yeah I had a blast. I came home with two frames; A cyclocross and a MTB. I broke the MTB but the Cyclo is still hanging in the garage. The Ti class I failed miserably at - it required a level of patience that I simply didn't have back then.

    I took both of the mechanics classes as well - very cool stuff.

    As far as the brazing/welding debate goes, I think it's like religion. Does it work for you? Great, stick with it - but I have my own God over here. And it is brazed.

    Plus I think it's just nice to look at.

    There was an issue of either Bicycle Guide or Mountain Bike Action, maybe around 1992 or 1993. On the cover was a bike made to appear as if held aloft by balloons. It was a steel bike, fillet brazed and clear coated - so it was raw with brass joints. I wish to hell I could remember what the bike was, but the damn thing weighed 15 pounds.

    Secretly, I wish there was a very nice, lugged hard tail available somewhere.

  30. #30
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    This is a little clearer than my explanation:

    “Custom frames are joined either by using fillet brazing, by using lugs or by tig welding. Simply put with a lugged frame, the tubes are joined by being brazed in a sleeve (the lug), while with a fillet brazed frame, the tubes are joined by the brazing alone.

    The big advantage of fillet brazing is versatility. Any tube size or angle, is possible. Lugs confine the maker to the exact diameter and angles of the lugs. The fillet also allows to raised (extended) headtube that enables the rider to get a higher hand position. Strengthwise the fillets produce the smallest stress riser because they taper out to nothing.

    Stress risers are a problem with some lugged frames, and these are more likely to develop cracks near the joint, usually next to the lug. To avoid this problem, we use silver solder with lugged frames, which has a lower temperature liquidus state (1200 degrees F) and puts less stress on the tube. We also taper the lugs.

    TIG joints also create more of a stress riser because of the short transition from the highly heated joint to the tube. Fillet brazing is done with brass, but at a lower temperature than when brass is used with lugged brazing, where the brass has to hit an 1800 degress F to capilate through the lug. Fillet brazing is done closer to the melting point, 150 degrees cooler.”

    OX3 and OX GOLD/PLATINUM are vastly different tube sets than Logic. I may have the chemistry off a bit here but, I believe there is a far higher percentage of chromium and it's O2 bathed during the heat treatment, which is a several step process in OX series tubes and a single step process in most others.

    OX3 is known as a very stiff tube set, more brittle but considerably stronger. Very thin walled....

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by mountaineer_2112
    Secretly, I wish there was a very nice, lugged hard tail available somewhere.
    These are trail worthy, though probably too fancy for what you're looking for.....

    Gotta love Rivendells dedication.
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    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith
    These are trail worthy, though probably too fancy for what you're looking for.....

    Gotta love Rivendells dedication.
    That bottom one is really nice.

    Steve Rex will do a mountain hard tail (Series FL) but I think it approaches $2500 for the frame alone...seriously nice work though....

    http://www.rexcycles.com/frames-parts/

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    a few more pictures...










  34. #34
    I picked two too many
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    mmm

    that's a tasty meat a ball

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by mountaineer_2112
    As far as the brazing/welding debate goes, I think it's like religion. Does it work for you? Great, stick with it - but I have my own God over here. And it is brazed.

    Secretly, I wish there was a very nice, lugged hard tail available somewhere.
    If brazed is your god, I believe there are many here that will kneel at the alter with you.

    As for a lugged hard tail, Singular makes a nice one at a reasonable price. Its a niner though. I have yet to hear any actual ride reports on it, but it looks good.
    Need: McMahon brake for roller cam mounts, Mountain Goat fork.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by mountaineer_2112
    That bottom one is really nice.
    Yeah, the Bombadil's are the higher end offerings. The paint on the top two is Taiwanese quickie (relatively speaking). To my knowledge all of their off road offerings are 650B. The top end Riv's get really nice paint, and more lug love. Joe Bell painted them for years, I think they've spun that off to someone else though....

    http://www.rivbike.com/products/list/bicycle_models
    This is a Pugs not some carbon wannabee pretzel wagon!!

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  37. #37
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    thats original paint? mine looks like it went though a war compared to yours. there's so much history with this bike and the Shades paint job that im not so motivated to re-paint it. i am however restored another Curtlo Action Tec at the moment and adding disc brakes to it as well. i'll likely send that one to Groovy for paint.

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    21.3 pounds with 636 spd's?!!?
    drop those pedals and the bar ends and you could see 18 with the rigid fork for sure!
    If steel is real then aluminium is supercallafragiliniun!

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by MendonCycleSmith
    Yeah, the Bombadil's are the higher end offerings. The paint on the top two is Taiwanese quickie (relatively speaking). To my knowledge all of their off road offerings are 650B. The top end Riv's get really nice paint, and more lug love. Joe Bell painted them for years, I think they've spun that off to someone else though....

    http://www.rivbike.com/products/list/bicycle_models

    D&D does them now. Much closer.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Veloculture
    thats original paint? mine looks like it went though a war compared to yours. there's so much history with this bike and the Shades paint job that im not so motivated to re-paint it. i am however restored another Curtlo Action Tec at the moment and adding disc brakes to it as well. i'll likely send that one to Groovy for paint.
    What's your plan for the rear disc mount?

  41. #41
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    Tig vs fillet.. meh.

    What really matters is Curtlo has been at the same joining method for 3 decades. Way before most if not all of the names you hear dropped now. He's in the good company of Potts, Sadof, etc.

    This thread is great. Every wrench and shop owner should read it.


    -Schmitty-

  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schmitty
    Tig vs fillet.. meh.

    What really matters is Curtlo has been at the same joining method for 3 decades. Way before most if not all of the names you hear dropped now. He's in the good company of Potts, Sadof, etc.

    This thread is great. Every wrench and shop owner should read it.


    -Schmitty-

    two decades according to Doug.

    But still an impressively long run of fillet brazing frames. Probably only a couple that have brazed more frames than him, maybe none.
    Last edited by Fillet-brazed; 05-08-2010 at 04:55 PM.

  43. #43
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    *Over* two decades.
    Somec is like the digital Zunow
    And this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JD5h3y0a9AU

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by yo-Nate-y
    *Over* two decades.
    sure. can't say I remember them before 88 or 89, but maybe he was crankin them out locally.

    I wonder how Tom R's output from just 78 to 90 would compare to Doug's decade longer run.

  45. #45
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    It's way closer to 3 decades if not over.

    "Bicycle Guide magazine summed up Doug's experience: “Technically, Curtlo Cycles came into being around 18 years ago..."

    Bicycle Guide was gone in the mid to late 90's right? 2010 now by my watch.

    It's here nor there... the dude can braze. Add Land Shark to that list.

    -Schmitty-

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by Schmitty

    It's here nor there... the dude can braze.

    yep. anyone ever seen an early one?

  47. #47
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    I finished fillets and worked on a ton of different frames back in the day including Curtlo's and Land Sharks (both are artists to be sure.). I've seen 'em all naked and some aren't so pretty.

    At that time Doug was only doing full finished fillet brazed stuff. Doug was playing around with some mini-fillets one day. They were so damn pretty and the heat used was almost nothing. I asked him to build me a frame using the mini's. Actually I think that I was just tired of finishing fillets! That was sometime in early . 1990. I went through a ton of frames (by choice...hey they were free!) I raced that original mini-fillet brazed frame, fork and stem in 1990 and then repainted it and turned it into a drop bar ride.

    In 1996 I repainted the frame once again, turned it into a flat bar bike again and road the heck out of it.

    A couple days ago I took the bike down from the rafters in the barn. Its sitting with me here in the living room now, covered with dust and hay, and waiting for me to get off my duff and fix it up. On the shelf is a photo of me on the bike at the 1990 Snow Summit National Point Series that I also found in the barn.

    Cool stuff!

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by SHADES
    I finished fillets and worked on a ton of different frames back in the day including Curtlo's and Land Sharks (both are artists to be sure.). I've seen 'em all naked and some aren't so pretty.

    At that time Doug was only doing full finished fillet brazed stuff. Doug was playing around with some mini-fillets one day. They were so damn pretty and the heat used was almost nothing. I asked him to build me a frame using the mini's. Actually I think that I was just tired of finishing fillets! That was sometime in early . 1990. I went through a ton of frames (by choice...hey they were free!) I raced that original mini-fillet brazed frame, fork and stem in 1990 and then repainted it and turned it into a drop bar ride.

    In 1996 I repainted the frame once again, turned it into a flat bar bike again and road the heck out of it.

    A couple days ago I took the bike down from the rafters in the barn. Its sitting with me here in the living room now, covered with dust and hay, and waiting for me to get off my duff and fix it up. On the shelf is a photo of me on the bike at the 1990 Snow Summit National Point Series that I also found in the barn.

    Cool stuff!

    Pictures!
    -eric-

    http://www.rumpfy.com
    Wanted: NDS Suntour XC Pro Microdrive 175mm Crank Arm.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rumpfy
    Pictures!
    Yeah, the ex got the camera, but I gotta get one. I'm waiting on a Manitou rebuild kit. Texas heat melted the old bumpers. I've got the original fork too, and the full drop bar setup, so you never know. Don't fret, I'm not going to touch it until I get a camera. Hay sticking out of the rims, Flight seat worked to death....

  50. #50
    artistic...
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    Quote Originally Posted by mountaineer_2112
    That bottom one is really nice.

    Steve Rex will do a mountain hard tail (Series FL) but I think it approaches $2500 for the frame alone...seriously nice work though....

    http://www.rexcycles.com/frames-parts/

    man... his work is stunning! i want something like that. one day.
    WTB: Bomber Z2 1 1/8 steerer, in good to excellent shape OR bomber rebuild kit.

  51. #51
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    This thread keeps reminding me why Curtlo is on the shorl list of builders, should I ever get around to ordering a custom frame.
    Need: McMahon brake for roller cam mounts, Mountain Goat fork.

  52. #52
    Relax. I'm a pro.
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    I wish we could still see the photos. The bike is way cool.
    Instagram: @antoine1000
    http://tfwo.tumblr.com

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