The Whole Enchilada info- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    LDC is ded,deth by trollz
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    The Whole Enchilada info

    Hello new to this site want to get some feedback on some trips I'm planning.

    When is the "season" open for the Whole Enchilada from top to bottom?

    What's the trail I would take to climb the backside to the top to start the descent?

    Can this be ridden on a rigid SS HT? 100mm FS Liv Lust for my gf? Or do we need 140 type bikes? What gearing is common for SS, I come from flat land where I push a 36 ring? 28/22 type stuff I'm thinking? No clue really.

    Has anyone done the Durango to Moab ride using the huts?


    Any locals who ride this regularly want to shred let me know.

    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Yeti SB95c
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    Season is mostly summer into October, although access to the top due to snow and end at any time in the fall.

    Most of us shuttle up with one of the shuttle services in Moab. They operate out of the bike shops such as Chile Pepper, Poison Spider, and Moab Cyclery. If you want to ride up then you have to climb something like 30 miles on paved and dirt roads. You would really struggle getting enough air into your lungs. The top is about 11,000 feet.

    Most riders use all mountain bikes, 150mm or so, I use a trail bike at 140mm, but I've seen hard tails on the lower sections that I ride. (Always snow on top when I'm in Moab.) I've rode Porky on an XC bike but not much fun. Lots of ledges and big rocks. It is a very bouncy ride.

    I can't help you with gears.

  3. #3
    LDC is ded,deth by trollz
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmpreston View Post
    Season is mostly summer into October, although access to the top due to snow and end at any time in the fall.

    Most of us shuttle up with one of the shuttle services in Moab. They operate out of the bike shops such as Chile Pepper, Poison Spider, and Moab Cyclery. If you want to ride up then you have to climb something like 30 miles on paved and dirt roads. You would really struggle getting enough air into your lungs. The top is about 11,000 feet.

    Most riders use all mountain bikes, 150mm or so, I use a trail bike at 140mm, but I've seen hard tails on the lower sections that I ride. (Always snow on top when I'm in Moab.) I've rode Porky on an XC bike but not much fun. Lots of ledges and big rocks. It is a very bouncy ride.

    I can't help you with gears.

    Thank you. I'm sure I can find plenty of climbing somewhere else then. I am not coming that far to shuttle everything though. Makes sense here need lots of energy on way down to stay precise. I hate suspension lol so to even imagine 150 is crazy. My friend has a canyon 150mm bike and it's funny how raked out it is. I ride 72* hta for the most part. Custom Ti, Karate Monkey, El mariachi, on one scandal, highball carbon, stumpy ht are all my bikes and not one of them will really work out there. Going to look into renting in this situation. Cheaper than buying one bike and let alone two. Thanks for info. Can't wait to just fly down this thing. Is there two way traffic? Is it possible to hit people head on?

  4. #4
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    I can't speak to the upper sections, but i rode lower porcupine single track and porcupine rim last spring on a rigid bike. If you're already used to rigid, you'll be fine. It's all down hill, so any gear will work at that point.

    There aren't any trees, so no concern with blind corners. I didn't see anyone riding up anyway. You'll love it.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by LaneDetroitCity View Post
    Is there two way traffic? Is it possible to hit people head on?
    Yes and yes.

  6. #6
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    Don't worry about your suspension. 100-150.... Who cares, ride it and have fun. I'd ride it on a hard tail of that was what I owned. It would force me to slow down and enjoy the scenery.


    Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by LaneDetroitCity View Post
    Thank you. I'm sure I can find plenty of climbing somewhere else then. I am not coming that far to shuttle everything though. Makes sense here need lots of energy on way down to stay precise. I hate suspension lol so to even imagine 150 is crazy. My friend has a canyon 150mm bike and it's funny how raked out it is. I ride 72* hta for the most part. Custom Ti, Karate Monkey, El mariachi, on one scandal, highball carbon, stumpy ht are all my bikes and not one of them will really work out there. Going to look into renting in this situation. Cheaper than buying one bike and let alone two. Thanks for info. Can't wait to just fly down this thing. Is there two way traffic? Is it possible to hit people head on?
    Ride whatever. What do you think we rode in the 80's-early 90's? Rigid forks on hardtails. I didn't even own a FS bike until 2000, so I probably rode Porcupine Rim 50 times on a hardtail, at least a dozen of those with rigid forks, and even when we did get suspension forks, they had 2.5" of travel at best.

    With that said, it is a *lot* more fun on a 150mm bike.

    Yes, there can be two way traffic on most of the trail, but for the most part everyone is going the same direction. Control your speed, specially the first time you ride there, not only because there could be someone else, but because if you crash, you can get really hurt. Enchilada and Porcupine have trees, cliffs, rocks. I know a lot of people who have gone from there directly to the hospital.

  8. #8
    Yeti SB95c
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    honkinunit is dead on correct.

    However, Moab has a new hospital so you would probably be rather comfortable there.

    Unless you really wiped out. Then expect a helicopter trip to the hospital in Grand Junction or Salt Lake City. Very expensive.

    Parts of the trail are 4WD accessible but first responders call in helicopters a lot now. As you ride think about your insurance deductible along with job and family. Ugly injuries happen out there.

    My YouTube MTB videos are trail analysis for intermediates but may be useful for you. Remember as you watch any videos that the cameras are wide angle and they flatten the scene. When you are on a bike the view ahead will be more challenging.

    Check my Porky video on my blog: Intermediate MTB | Bike and Trails Analysis for Intermediate Mountain Bikers. It covers the lower trail system part of TWE (The Whole Enchilada) including UPS, LPS, and Porky. I'm shooting a new TWE video and I'll make some improvements but need to shoot a few parts next year when my wife is with me to help.

    If you really want to climb then bomb check out my Thunder Mountain Trail video! Everyone I've talked to who rides it considers it one of their top ten trails. 4 hour drive west from Moab though, but then you are close to The Goose. If you want some technical mega-fun then the South Rim and Hidden Canyon Trails on Gooseberry Mesa are amazing!

  9. #9
    Yeti SB95c
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    J0hn, no trees on Porky? Please, there are "towering" junipers!

    :-)

    There are a few places on UPS and LPS with short sight lines that can get interesting.

  10. #10
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    OK, I shouldn't have said "no" trees, but if you've been mountain biking almost anywhere else, this area is going to feel very open by comparison.

  11. #11
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    I rode it with 130 travel and thought it was fine. I saw guys on fully rigid 29+ bikes (a few SS) when we did it this summer. That said, it is a long, rough trail. I would strongly consider treating yourself to a FS rental for the day. My whole body was worn out even on a full suspension.

    You can ride up, but it's a brute as mentioned. Hell, it took me almost 5 hours just to get DOWN. Don't under estimate the effects of altitude.

    Pack LOTS of water, bring first aid, make sure your bike is in tip top shape. You're gonna use a lot of brakes! Burro isn't the place you wanna find out you need new pads or a bleed.

    FYI, I haven't done the hut to hut but heard from others it is a good time.
    Last edited by cobi; 11-18-2015 at 03:54 PM.

  12. #12
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    ...and if you decide to rent a bike, CHECK IT OUT CAREFULLY. We failed to do that and rented a 160mm travel bike from one of the shops and we had a few issues with the bike once we got out on the trail. Nothing earth shattering but minor stuff that we had to deal with every few miles.

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