Ultimate Moab Bike Question Thread- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Ultimate Moab Bike Question Thread

    So here it is again, if you could buy one bike for riding Moab what would it be?

    Me…
    ~160 lb ready to ride

    My style…
    Enjoy technical climbs with ledges and uber steep sections
    Love smooth jumps up to 10-15 feet of distance
    I’ll do most drops up to 6-8 feet if the landing is GOOD, if it’s to flat, 3 feet is about the most I enjoy
    I like to try things that sometime require quick dismounts, so it needs to be a bit thicker walled than a tin can.
    Slow trials type moves over large rocks and logs are fun too (not that I’m great at them)

    I already have a light 5+” XC bike and an 8” "climbable"DH bike, so this would be my one bike to bring to Moab. Currently, I have to bring both of these.

    What trails you ask…
    Porcupine (Hazard to Jackass) – must survive lots of fast paced rides down this taking every air
    Amasa Back and Rock Stacker (gotta clean the climb too)
    Sovereign (I clean 99.9% on my XC bike and would like to still do that)

    I try to ride in Moab about 10 weekends per year, but I would also use the bike some in Fruita/Grand Junction, Brianhead, Tahoe, Jackson, BC (I’m hoping next summer is the year)

  2. #2
    Err
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    Easy, Knolly Delirium-T. It will excel at everything you mentioned.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Err
    Easy, Knolly Delirium-T. It will excel at everything you mentioned.
    Very sweet looking bike, but I just don't feel like I need a 9.5 lb frame with my light weight. Also, I am a little worried that with only 160mm of travel in the rear I'd get rattled to death at 30mph on porcupine. While cost isn't a big deal cause I'm the kind that looks for a deal, I doubt I'd find that frame at any discount. I will say that when you are paying that much for a frame it's nice to know it's burly. The Knolly sure sounds tough. Keep the ideas coming.

    I rode my 6" Ells ID again today after spending most of my time lately riding my 8" Bighit. I had a blast flicking it around. So light. If it only had another inch of travel, another pound of aluminum, and a little lower BB I'd be in heaven. I figure I will turn that into a pure 5" XC bike once I find something in the middle.

    BTW- have you worked out your log ride on Moose yet? I've finally got the chute down, but the log, and that silly dry creek are my last two sections to clean. Then I need to do it all in one ride. Not sure that will ever happen

  4. #4
    JMH
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    IronHorse 6point series... my 7point was a bit more bike than necessary for Moab, the 6point appears to have 90% of the capability in a package that weighs five pounds less.

    Or, someone else is going to say it if I dont: A Nomad.

    Or... I have been loving my Covert. With big wheels and DH tires it would weigh 35lbs and confidently handle Porc at any speed short of full-on DH bike madness, but put some AM wheels on and cruise the Crest at 30-32lbs. It's not much more bike than your Ellsworth, but is built a little bit more ruggedly and won't break the bank.

    Or, a Turner Highline.

    JMH

  5. #5
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    Bonking ... not feelin' well

    Quote Originally Posted by JMH
    Or, a Turner Highline.
    I'd put the Highline in the same boat as the 7Point. I really wasn't a fan of mine on Porc., it's just more bike than you need.

    Square edge rocks are gonna be rough no matter what. The ticket is a bike that's light enough to pedal fast and keep your momentum up so that you can jump over the roughest sections. There are plenty of flat and "climby" sections and there aren't any really big moves, so I think a burly trail bike gets the job done, especially for smaller guys like us.

    I was once again convinced this weekend that the Heckler is about perfect for the job. So, something like a Covert, RFX (or even 5 Spot), Nomad, etc, etc. will get the job done.

    That just covers Porcupine, though. There are some rides that a freeride bike is nice, like Bartlett's and the DH trails in town. I haven't done Rockstacker, yet. Every time we're on Amasa, something prevents us from cutting right and heading out towards Billboard, usually time constraints. It sounds like a bigger bike might be nice for that, but we'll see. I definitely don't mind the big bike as much when it's consistent granny gear climbing (Amasa) vs. flat and pedally (Porcupine). Fortunately, you have options and a big bike rack.

  6. #6
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    it sounds like you want the perfect bike that will do all and handle all..... I think you are being a little to picky.

    you can't have a really light frame that can handle the abuse that you described.

    you can't have a 7 inch travel frame that will climb as good as your xc bike.

    you can't have the right angles to climb a really technical climb one minute and then fly down insanely rocky sections the next.

    ok enough of that, now here are my suggestions that might work somewhat as a medium between the two bikes you already have.
    Bottlerocket with a 66 sl ata on it. great for up hill cause you can crank it down, great for steeps cause you can crank the fork back up. and can jump better then most bikes.

    an interesting looking one that might be more what your looking for is a Banshee Wildcard. it is 6.5 travel and the frame only weights around 7 pounds. it could jump and handle the downhill. not sure on the pedaling but im sure it would be good with an airshock in the rear and an adjustable fork up front. either a roco piggy back air or a dhx air in the rear and a 66 sl ata in the front would be pretty sweet.

  7. #7
    goo
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    You should check out a vp-free, just set it up light with a totem. You'll probably laugh at me, but I saw some pics and read the specs of the new Trek Remedy and it looks pretty sick. My friend rode one at the Trek demo and said that the new pivot design it slick, it climbs better and he said it feels like you have more travel than you do.

    Or a 05 Blue Kona Coiler with 2 dents on the down tube.

  8. #8
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    I am way out of the loop, just curious how and spec. enduro and transition preston would fit into the mix here.

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    Quote Originally Posted by climbingbubba
    it sounds like you want the perfect bike that will do all and handle all..... I think you are being a little to picky.
    Not at all, I'm looking to fill a quiver, not do everything. I have a 8x8 bike for lift served, bigger hucks, and ultra steep and rough. I have a 5x5 (currently ultralight 6x6) for XC, endurance racing, and the uber long rides I enjoy. I'm looking to fill the middle - Good for long rides only if the group is "slower" or there is lots of down, "decent" for climbing but not going to win any hill climbs, fun as hell on the down as long as it's not too burly, and great for tech stuff.

    Quote Originally Posted by climbingbubba
    you can't have a really light frame that can handle the abuse that you described.
    Sure I can, I'm light, 160 lbs w/gear (I realize everything can break, I just don't want to get dented from a light drop or break from a lightly cased double)

    Quote Originally Posted by climbingbubba
    you can't have a 7 inch travel frame that will climb as good as your xc bike.
    Not looking for one, currently I do a lot of climbing on the 40lb 8x8 bike and I find it's more the flats that kill me. All that rolling resistance I think.

    Quote Originally Posted by climbingbubba
    you can't have the right angles to climb a really technical climb one minute and then fly down insanely rocky sections the next.
    Good point, but after climbing on the bighit I think I can adjust some for the angles. Cockpit length is more of a concern cause I hate doing a techie move on a climb and ramming my knee into the stem.

    Quote Originally Posted by climbingbubba
    ok enough of that, now here are my suggestions that might work somewhat as a medium between the two bikes you already have.
    Bottlerocket with a 66 sl ata on it. great for up hill cause you can crank it down, great for steeps cause you can crank the fork back up. and can jump better then most bikes.

    an interesting looking one that might be more what your looking for is a Banshee Wildcard. it is 6.5 travel and the frame only weights around 7 pounds. it could jump and handle the downhill. not sure on the pedaling but im sure it would be good with an airshock in the rear and an adjustable fork up front. either a roco piggy back air or a dhx air in the rear and a 66 sl ata in the front would be pretty sweet.
    Thanks, I thought about a Bottlerocket, but it's as heavy as the Dirtbag, something like 10lbs with a shock. You had me pretty stoked about the wildcard till I looked at the geo. I would need over a 400mm long Gravity Dropper to trail ride that bike.

    Bags - you may be right that I can get away with less than I think. There is a dude willing to sell me an Ells Moment chainstay which would eliminate the strength (and tire clearance) issue on my ID. It's temping, but I'd still need to do something to make it lighter/faster for 24 hr racing. My head hurts.
    Last edited by phatfreeheeler; 09-25-2007 at 07:20 PM.

  10. #10
    goo
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    Ok dude, I thought you were looking for a do it all bike. I'll try and make your decision even harder.
    -Specialized Trail SX.(Similiar suspsension to the Bighit, so it would be a good transition)
    -Titus Supermoto.
    -Ellsworth Rogue.(Similiar suspsension to the ID, so it would be a good transition, also adjustable travel so you have options)

    I would set up all of them with a DHX air, and lighter single crown shock(totem, lyric, domain, 36, 66 ata). Run them with a somewhat light wheelset and ghetto tubeless setup.

    Something I would consider is how similiar the suspension is to your other bike, when I am switching from my blur to my coiler, it takes me a while to get used to the different suspension setup and feel.

  11. #11
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    i guess i misunderstood you. you had said you wanted more then 160 in the rear so i assumed you wanted 7 inches.

    as for the bottlerocket, mine weights just over 9 pounds with a dhx air in the rear. my bike weights about 35.5 complete. and there are a few more things i could lighten. i don't have tubless and im running all x7 and i have a 66 up front. you could easily get it down to 33 with a fox 36 or the new 55 ata and x0 and tubless. just a thought. im only pushing it cause i like mine so much. although i think a wildcard will replace it in a few years.

    If a gravity dropper is all you would have to buy to make the wildcard work then go for it. my bottlerocket has the same size seat tube and i get away with a 400mm seattube. its a little annoying looking when its fully extended but when you slam it all the way down it rocks!!! you can jump and flick the bike around like crazy.

  12. #12
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    Don't get me wrong, the Bottlerocket seems like a killer bike, especially for slopestyle type riding. I'm just not yet convinced that I'd like 5.5" of travel. I'd need to ride something rough at high speeds with less than 6" of travel to see. Looks like I may get the opportunity in a few weeks to try both a Nomad and a Brodie Zealot on Porcupine. Maybe I'll know more after that. I might even spend one day on Porcupine on the Ells, just to see how it feels. I keep coming back to the thought that I should just suck it up and be happy with the two bikes I have. I'll have to do Amasa back on the Bighit and see how it goes. I just need to have my Ells lightened up for next years 24hrs of Moab cause I want to put in some sub 1:10 laps.

    Bags -my buddy who rides Rockstacker all the time says a solid 6" bike is plenty for it. He uses his VP-free just because he sold his Heckler. It was built kinda like yours.

    Gaugh - Yeah those are the bikes that keep going through my head for the reasons you state. The SX is the lightest frame of those. If I find one cheap I'll probably do it. Otherwise, I'll just wait and keep riding every bike I can. BTW - want to ride this week?

  13. #13
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    I am going to hijack this thread since it is dying...

    I think the bottlerocket looks badass, but probably overbuilt for my riding. The cdale prophet, specialized enduro and transition covert/prestons look nice. Possibly an older intense uzzi. I am totally out of the loop with bike technology - but would like to get a newish used FS bike.

    I know a couple of you guys. Eric - I'm Jason from the gym. James/Jordan - I've ridden moose with you a few times with a hardtail trek last year. I know you guys know your stuff and am open to suggestions. My bike has devolved into something I want to beat with a hammer and I'm riding it less and less.

  14. #14
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    hey jason,
    I would say go for the preston. you can find a ton of frames used on ebay. they pop up every week.
    if you can get an 07 cause they changed the shock mount and now it has a better leverage ratio. the 06 would still be good but im pretty sure if you go older than that they are only 4 inches of travel. get that frame with an all mountain sl 1 or a fox 36 and you will be set.

  15. #15
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    Hey Jason, got to agree with CB. A preston would probably suit your trials style better than something with tons of travel. And it's plenty strong for those rare getoffs where you put the bike into a tree or rock. Oh wait, that's me. A buddy rides one with a 5" fork and it's solid. He rides it for everything from XC to laps at Deer Valley. Other bikes like the preston are the c'dale prophet MX, Turner Spot, Santa Cruz Heckler, Titus Motolite, Chumba XCL, Kona Dawg, . They are all strong ~5" frames with lower BB's. I would seriously look at single pivots. Everyone I know with trials skills swears that they are easier to do precise moves with.

    I know what you mean about not wanting to ride your bike. That's one of my biggest excuses for my upgrade-itis. Having new stuff which works nice helps to motivate me to keep getting out there and riding.

    Forgot to say, go 20mm thru axle up front - really makes the front end more precise.

  16. #16
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    Cool, thanks for the advice guys. The preston looks really nice from everything I've seen online. Thanks for not just calling me out as lazy - I have been. I've got to get out with you guys and ride again.

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    Everybody's got one - an opinion, I mean. Here's mine:

    I'm a huge fan of the 5-6" travel bikes out these days. I ride an aging Enduro with 5x5, air sprung. I think it rules. The better I've gotten, the more I enjoy it (I try to imagine what it would be like to ride if I were actually any good ). I raced it in a Dual Slalom this year, and once I got over the fear of hitting gap jumps on it, it took on a whole new perspective. I've been on the less ancient version of this bike (which I think is 6x6) and I still think it's great. I'm with JMH on the size issue. Moab doesn't need too much. Most trails don't - just watch Err do his thing on that little air-sprung Nicolai. I've ridden Porcupine on my Enduro and my Yeti ASX, and it doesn't matter too much to me - the lighter bike seems to hold speed and allow me to flick it over things, while the bigger bike can just plow through. They're both fun. I think the bigger deal is geometry. If you like going downhill fast, find a bike with slack angles, good standover and low BB and you'll feel pretty good. If it has an adjustable fork, gravity dropper and killer tires - even better! And if you don't mind a little extra weight - coils rule!

  18. #18
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    Hold out for the new Yeti Seven?

    And yeah I think Nomad, 6.6, SX Trail would all be worth considering. The FSR suspension is gonna be a lot happier over all the square-edge hits than something single pivot, but it's not that big of a deal - just different riding style. I still can't believe I say this, but I'm still really impressed with my Prophet MX. Throw a leg over one and see what you think. Low BB, corners sick, low standover, tight, fast, confidence-inspiring. It's a good little bike. That said, I'd still rather have a bit more travel on Porc., my ASX was an ideal Moab ride IMO. Something with aggressive trail/freeride geometry (slack HA, lowish BB)and about 160-170mm travel.

  19. #19
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    I've got and SX trail with a Totem that I've built down to 34 pounds. It serves me unbelievably well for all kinds of riding from cross country to downhill. It can take unruly amounts of abuse but still pedals uphill incredibly well. It's not going to win you any cross country races and If It's full on lift or shuttle gnarliness with big stunts then I still pull out the 8x8 bike but I really don't need to. From the reviews the Nomad looks like it'd be a perfect bike that'd be even better for the climbing . . if I could just get over the way they look I might have checked out that route.

  20. #20
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    "From the reviews the Nomad looks like it'd be a perfect bike that'd be even better for the climbing . . if I could just get over the way they look I might have checked out that route."

    No doubt. I'm sure the "nut-wrecker" toptube serves some functional purpose, but come on . Looks even worse on a Jackal, where you know it's bound to happen one day. . .

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