Trail access from Downtown SLC?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    139

    Trail access from Downtown SLC?

    Are there many trails accessible from Downtown SLC (UofU area) without a vehicle or do you pretty much need to drive to get to the trailheads?

    Thanks

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: swift's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    590
    Access Bonneville Shoreline trail, and the many spurs that come off it, right below the big "U" on the mountain.

    From Popperton Park behind Shriner's, pedal up the road toward the "U" and onto the pedestrian path that circumvents the gates on the roadway. Follow until it turns to dirt and Bob's your uncle.

  3. #3
    JMH
    JMH is offline
    Sugary Exoskeleton
    Reputation: JMH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    4,659
    The only nearby trail is the shoreline network described by Swift. Anything else is either a long pedal or a drive.

    I love the riding around SLC but you need a car or friends who don't mind driving you.

    JMH

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    139
    Thanks for the feedback.
    As locals, how would describe the BST in terms of distance, difficulty, style etc...I have read a bit on it but would love some local views on it.
    I am here in NY, considering a move out to SLC sometime in May, and just trying to get an idea as to what I need to prepare for to reach the trails. Like, do I need a vehicle, for instance...
    Also, and i know this is MTBr.com, but are there any good road rides headed out of Downtown?

    Thanks again

  5. #5
    MTBR member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    798
    There are lots of nice canyons for road riding (Emmigration, Cottonwood canyons, Millcreek), but the drivers are bad in Utah. The BST is great for weekday/afterwork riding, but you'll want a vehicle to reach the good stuff (Park City, St George, Moab). I'm an East coast transplant myself (Connecticut native, moved to Utah from Spain) and the biggest adjustment for me was finding good food, especially seafood. Dont woory about the liquor laws, and check out utahmountainbiking.com. There are lots of road cycling groups in SLC also. Cheers!

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Posts
    92
    You already have some good feedback, so I guess I will just add my $0.02 for consensus. The BST has spurs that will basically get you from behind the Capitol Building which is at the north end of the Salt Lake valley to south end of the valley (probably around 30 miles of trail give or take). For an Easterner I think you will be impressed with the view, but it isn't really an adrenaline inducing ride. Park City, Mill Creek, and Big Cottonwood all have nice rides, but you will need a car. I really like the trail network in Draper, but again, for that you need a car (or if you are not in a time crunch you could take the train and bus).

    The downside is Salt Lake is full and there is no room for any more transplants

    Good luck with your move!

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: willymcd's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Posts
    420
    Quote Originally Posted by cskolnick
    Thanks for the feedback.
    As locals, how would describe the BST in terms of distance, difficulty, style etc...I have read a bit on it but would love some local views on it.
    I am here in NY, considering a move out to SLC sometime in May, and just trying to get an idea as to what I need to prepare for to reach the trails. Like, do I need a vehicle, for instance...
    Also, and i know this is MTBr.com, but are there any good road rides headed out of Downtown?

    Thanks again

    I think the BST is pretty awesome for a trail network so close to town, though they have *****fied it in the past few years, and they finished taking out the last of the semi technical rock gardens out of dry creek last fall, a-holes. From the U, I like heading up dry creek by the jew center, you can link that up to bobsled, which is awesome or keep going to city creek, to I street where the jumps are.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    1,135
    I live very close to the U campus and one of the best things about it is being able to ride through campus for 15 minutes and be on singletrack. AND live close to downtown. AND be 30 minutes from Snowbird. You can't beat SLC/Utah for outdoor access.

    Sure there are better trails that require a car, but IMO Salt Lake has some of the best non-driving accessed trails in the country.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    240
    Quote Originally Posted by cskolnick
    Thanks for the feedback.
    As locals, how would describe the BST in terms of distance, difficulty, style etc...I have read a bit on it but would love some local views on it.
    The BST is not really a 'technical' trail, but it's not a ride in the park, either. The section north of the city (between Dry Creek and City Creek Canyon) tops out at about 6000 feet. The valley floor is about 4300 feet and the main U of U campus is about 5000. When I lived in the Avenues, I rode a 9-mile loop every morning, from my apartment, up to the BST, and back. It took about an hour to complete, but I'm a slow climber.

    The BST is perfect for that kind of daily routine riding. You have a steady climb at the beginning, then some long stretches of relatively flat cruising, where you can look out at some of the best views of the valley and lake, then there is the descent back down to the city.

    My only complaints are that it can get extremely crowded at certain times and on certain days. You're constantly stopping to let pedestrians and other bikers pass. Also, I wasn't up there much last summer, but the dog situation was completely out of control back when I rode regularly. In a 5-mile segment of trail, I would sometimes pass 20 free-roaming off-leash dogs whose owners were nowhere in sight, and on a busy summer afternoon, you're dodging a pile of poop every few hundred feet at times.

    If you can ride in the early morning, or during the day when most people are in school or at work, you can have most of it to yourself. Also, there is a lesser used segment of the BST, in the Ensign Peak area, which offers some nice single-track, better views of the lake, and much smaller crowds. It's easily accessible from downtown SLC.

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Posts
    139
    Quote Originally Posted by authalic
    The BST is not really a 'technical' trail, but it's not a ride in the park, either. The section north of the city (between Dry Creek and City Creek Canyon) tops out at about 6000 feet. The valley floor is about 4300 feet and the main U of U campus is about 5000. When I lived in the Avenues, I rode a 9-mile loop every morning, from my apartment, up to the BST, and back. It took about an hour to complete, but I'm a slow climber.

    The BST is perfect for that kind of daily routine riding. You have a steady climb at the beginning, then some long stretches of relatively flat cruising, where you can look out at some of the best views of the valley and lake, then there is the descent back down to the city.

    My only complaints are that it can get extremely crowded at certain times and on certain days. You're constantly stopping to let pedestrians and other bikers pass. Also, I wasn't up there much last summer, but the dog situation was completely out of control back when I rode regularly. In a 5-mile segment of trail, I would sometimes pass 20 free-roaming off-leash dogs whose owners were nowhere in sight, and on a busy summer afternoon, you're dodging a pile of poop every few hundred feet at times.

    If you can ride in the early morning, or during the day when most people are in school or at work, you can have most of it to yourself. Also, there is a lesser used segment of the BST, in the Ensign Peak area, which offers some nice single-track, better views of the lake, and much smaller crowds. It's easily accessible from downtown SLC.
    Great info, thanks. Very familiar with the poop dodge myself.

    Moving out at the start of May and really looking forward to the riding.

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.