Thinking of moving to St George.- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Thinking of moving to St George.

    Can someone give me a heads-up on what part of St George is a good area to live for biking, night life etc?

    Besides biking, I like to shoot pool. Are there any good bars with tables?

    Are there areas around St George I should consider as well?

    Anyone know a good real estate agent?

    I'll be planning a trip for a week soon, so any info would be most appreciated...

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    I'd move to Santa Clara in two seconds if I could find a job in the area. The trails are close enough to ride to. Don't know what the night life is like there though, doubt it's very exciting.

    St George is small though. You could live just about anywhere and be a 15 minute or less drive from awesome trails.

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    Night life? You mean like a midnight run to Walmart? We have that.

    Also, there is a bar. Seedy if that's what you like. Or you can drink your beer at home. That's two options. Options are nice.

    For biking, I would say Bloomington or Santa Clara.

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    I think they might have a couple pool tables at fiesta fun lol.

  5. #5
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    For a nice place to have a glass of wine and food we like George's Corner on St. George Blvd. The next closest place we've found to hang out is Bit & Spur in Springdale. Locals may know somewhere else but they are keeping it very quiet. I don't recall seeing a pool table in the region but we haven't explored bars, just bars at fine dining restaurants.

    Santa Clara is a nice tidy little conservative town. It has a nice coffee shop and the trails are very close. However, no matter where you live in the area the trails are very close.

    Housing is dirt cheap. I've chatted with local retirees on the trails and that seems to be a main reason for moving there.

    Springdale is nice and cooler but like Sedona it is more expensive. Terrific views of Zion NP. That is the only town we could live in. The tourists create some kind of evening life.

  6. #6
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    Wow, I had no idea it was THAT dead.

    Thanks for the replies; I'll look more into Santa Clara and Springdale...

  7. #7
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    Well, if you want night life the only option is Las Vegas that I know of but maybe Cedar City has a little. Hurricane, Virgin, Laverkin, etc are all very quiet towns. Fine dining in Hurricane is at Dairy Queen and a Mexican restaurant.

    The riding is great in SW UT though! I was there for a week last March and we plan to be there for the week of the Red Bull Rampage. Their local MTB club has a $250k trail building budget so there will be a lot more trails.

    While this type of trail riding is also available around Moab the South Rim and Hidden Canyon trails on Gooseberry Mesa (The Goose) seem to be unique and certainly challenging.

    The Over The Edge Sports (OTE) guys in Hurricane are trying to find someone to invest in a pizza restaurant there if that suits you.

    There are several nice bike shops in St. George but my preference is Red Rock. Big place with lots of inventory and fast service. Hurricane has OTE and Springdale has Zion Bikes. I've been happy with them.

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    Cedar doesn't really have the night life I think the OP is looking for. It's probably worse than St. George. They do have a decent bar called Frogz. They do dancing and all that jazz. Mesquite might be more OPs style with all the casinos.

  9. #9
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    Remember you're moving to rural Utah! Mormons don't drink.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmpreston View Post
    There are several nice bike shops in St. George but my preference is Red Rock. Big place with lots of inventory and fast service. Hurricane has OTE and Springdale has Zion Bikes. I've been happy with them.
    Really? Unless you're looking for a Specialized product, the Red Rock shop is pretty much worthless but they do have Specialized shoes, helmets & tires for sure. Their demos that people in my group used (1 guy tried 3 separate bikes) were not up to par with OTE and had crappy builds. We had a a guy that was having an issue with his dropper post so we took it in since the guy with the demo was swapping bikes. The shop at Red Rock mis-diagnosed the problem and said "in any case, we can't fix it". We took it out to OTE and they contacted Rock Shox and they warrantied the entire dropper. OTE then installed a brand new post while we went for lunch.

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    Quote Originally Posted by k2rider1964 View Post
    Really? Unless you're looking for a Specialized product, the Red Rock shop is pretty much worthless but they do have Specialized shoes, helmets & tires for sure. Their demos that people in my group used (1 guy tried 3 separate bikes) were not up to par with OTE and had crappy builds. We had a a guy that was having an issue with his dropper post so we took it in since the guy with the demo was swapping bikes. The shop at Red Rock mis-diagnosed the problem and said "in any case, we can't fix it". We took it out to OTE and they contacted Rock Shox and they warrantied the entire dropper. OTE then installed a brand new post while we went for lunch.
    Agreed. I avoid those guys at all costs. I've never had a good experience there. If it ain't a Spec they don't want to sell it to you, even if it's in their store. It's worth it in my opinion to drive to hurricane and spend money at ote than to fart around with those bozos.

  12. #12
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    Mesquite Nevada (36 miles down the road) might fill your need for some night life, or 2 hours to Vegas for the weekend should do it. We just retired (age 56) and will be moving to Hurricane in a few months for the small town life, biking, hiking, canyons, scenic beauty, quick access to remote solitude, clean air and new adventures. Great place and good people.

  13. #13
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    Oh-oh. I along with a bunch of buddies are heading to Hurricane next month for some riding. We thought the night life (and dining) in Moab was dead (and horrible). Looks like we are going to have some challenges in Hurricane.

  14. #14
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    mtnbimike, Hurricane has zero night life :-) The Over The Edge Sports mtb shop in Hurricane asked me to invest in a pizza restaurant in Hurricane to give them a life there. Moab is vastly more interesting than any of the towns in SW Utah. The best evening hang outs are Georges Corner in St. George and Bit and Spur in Springdale. That's it. Ride hard during the day and sleep at night.

    However, Hurricane has "The Goose" to ride and there is nothing like that anywhere in the West. Probably unique in the world.

    Hint: Tickets for the Red Bull Rampage may be available Monday, tomorrow. We'll be there.

  15. #15
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    Doesn't St. George have more than 75,000 people there? How is it that it doesn't have more night life?

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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    Doesn't St. George have more than 75,000 people there? How is it that it doesn't have more night life?
    Mormons. We are a family oriented people.

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    Quote Originally Posted by PiousInquisitor View Post
    Mormons. We are a family oriented people.
    Ok. Thanks. So I take it then that St. George is quite different from Moab in terms of its demographics?

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    stand around the campfire taking turns telling tall tales.....

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by UtahJohn View Post
    stand around the campfire taking turns telling tall tales.....
    Sounds completely over the top. I guess time will tell if it's really as good as your make it out to be.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    Sounds completely over the top. I guess time will tell if it's really as good as your make it out to be.
    Yeah, is this good:
    https://youtu.be/VPIP9KXdmO0

  21. #21
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    Since I hang out in the Zion - St. George area with just myself or with wife in the evenings I've hunted for some sort of social gathering place. If you find something other than the bar at Bit & Spur in Springdale or George's Corner in St. George please post on this thread.

    The campfires in the tent section of Zion River RV Resort can be good at times. We're thinking of camping up on The Goose but if it rains the access road becomes a disaster for a few days. We don't want to have to ride to the camp from Apple Valley on our bikes, and in mud. At Rampage last year there was a rumor that a Hummer got stuck there.

  22. #22
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    Hopefully, you're not single or you may quickly regret moving to St George. Otherwise, the weather & riding is pretty great! If I ever buy another place there, I would look out by Sand Hollow or the Hurricane airport.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by deadbolt View Post
    Wow, I had no idea it was THAT dead.

    Thanks for the replies; I'll look more into Santa Clara and Springdale...
    Dead...it's not as lively as these posts suggest!

  24. #24
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    Guys meet girls at church and school. If like me you don't attend either, you might be screwed.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mtnbkrmike View Post
    Ok. Thanks. So I take it then that St. George is quite different from Moab in terms of its demographics?
    I know nothing about St. George but a lot about Moab. Moab is the least Mormon town in Utah, with the possible exception of Park City. I do know it has a younger demographic than St. George, also. St. George is a huge retirement haven, Moab has some retirees, but is mostly second homes and locals who work for outdoor companies, the federal government, or in town, mashed in with a little mining and oil/gas. Moab also has a much higher proportion of tourists than St. George.

    I wouldn't call Moab a nightlife hotspot, but there are several bars and a brewery. It is colder and more isolated than St. George though. Two hours from St. George gets you to Las Vegas, two hours from Moab gets you Blanding, Cortez, Grand Junction or Price. Three hours to Telluride, which is a great BMW town. BMW = Bring Money With.

  26. #26
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    Cedar City is an hour north of St. George. Roughly 20 miles of trail to ride at Three Peaks. Great trail system for those in-between months where other trails are snowed in or wet. CC also has plans for ~100 miles of trail in the immediate area. Another 45 minutes up the hill from Cedar City to Brian Head for biking in summer, skiing in winter (if you do that sort of thing). It could be 90 down in CC but only 60 up on the plateau. Nice alpine riding up there.

    If it were me, I would live in Cedar City. It has better access to a wide variety of riding. By better I mean a good central location to start from. An hour south to St. George, 45 minutes east to the plateau, 90 minutes to Bryce area (Thunder Mountain, Casto/Losee Canyon, etc), 45 minutes south to JEM trailhead (it takes 40 minutes to get to JEM from St. George!). When you really need a Moab fix it's a 4 hour drive from CC to Moab city proper.

    Also, CC is about 10-15 cooler on average than St. George in the summer. I suppose the only thing I could complain about are the inconsiderate coal-rolling rednecks but I swear that's a statewide epidemic so it's really a non-issue.
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  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by dgw2jr View Post

    If it were me, I would live in Cedar City. It has better access to a wide variety of riding. By better I mean a good central location to start from.
    A friend of mine has lived in Cedar for over 10 years. He likes the access to the outdoors, and the University does offer a little culture, but CC is pretty dominated by the church, and has almost no adult nightlife. He is not Mormon, and he ran into some blatant discrimination there when he needed a variance from the city to build a house. Basically, he had to hire Mormons to get his plan approved, or it wasn't going to happen.

    Given the OP's specific question about nightlife, I'm not sure Cedar City fits the bill, since it is definitely more traditional Utah than St. George or Moab.

  28. #28
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    don't do it. i moved here for the mountain biking and the life that comes with it blows. the people are all brain washed and night life and socializing doesn't exist. i'm currently looking to get the hell out of here. the trails actually aren't very good here either. none of them are maintained and the the ones that are built are designed like ancient xc trails

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by invol2ver View Post
    don't do it. i moved here for the mountain biking and the life that comes with it blows. the people are all brain washed and night life and socializing doesn't exist. i'm currently looking to get the hell out of here. the trails actually aren't very good here either. none of them are maintained and the the ones that are built are designed like ancient xc trails
    To where are referring, so I know to stay far away?

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    Quote Originally Posted by invol2ver View Post
    don't do it. i moved here for the mountain biking and the life that comes with it blows. the people are all brain washed and night life and socializing doesn't exist. i'm currently looking to get the hell out of here. the trails actually aren't very good here either. none of them are maintained and the the ones that are built are designed like ancient xc trails
    Good.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by invol2ver View Post
    the trails actually aren't very good here either. none of them are maintained and the the ones that are built are designed like ancient xc trails
    Wait a minute, this sounds like a selling point to me. I like rougher trails that don't "flow."
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  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mookie View Post
    Wait a minute, this sounds like a selling point to me. I like rougher trails that don't "flow."
    Except for the cow trails though, right?
    The leg bone's connected to the Cash Bone!

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by honkinunit View Post
    A friend of mine has lived in Cedar for over 10 years. He likes the access to the outdoors, and the University does offer a little culture, but CC is pretty dominated by the church, and has almost no adult nightlife. He is not Mormon, and he ran into some blatant discrimination there when he needed a variance from the city to build a house. Basically, he had to hire Mormons to get his plan approved, or it wasn't going to happen.

    Given the OP's specific question about nightlife, I'm not sure Cedar City fits the bill, since it is definitely more traditional Utah than St. George or Moab.
    St George is going to be pretty much the same scene. I live in a heavily Mormon dominated town up here in the north and so far no problem. And I like to drink a lot of beer.
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  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mookie View Post
    St George is going to be pretty much the same scene. I live in a heavily Mormon dominated town up here in the north and so far no problem. And I like to drink a lot of beer.
    I don't know, but having done some business there, Cedar City has always seemed a little backward to me. Coming from a non-Utah raised Mormon, it seems pretty dominated by a few families -- everyone kinda has to know someone. I don't think I would live in Cedar City.

    I think St. George would be a more diverse/interesting/integrated place to live, personally, at least compared to anywhere else in the area. Seems to me that you have more influx of out of state retirees and such in St. George.
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  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by PiousInquisitor View Post
    Agreed. I avoid those guys at all costs. I've never had a good experience there. If it ain't a Spec they don't want to sell it to you, even if it's in their store. It's worth it in my opinion to drive to hurricane and spend money at ote than to fart around with those bozos.
    Same here. Red Rock downgraded my carbon Bronson reservation to an aluminum Tallboy with 1.9 Slant six tires at the last minute, and didn't offer a rebate. OTE upgraded my Rocky Mt reservation to a Knolly and spent time making sure it fit before I left. Great people at OTE.

  36. #36
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    I have lived in So Utah for over 16 years. I personally find it the greatest place on the planet but I'm not myopic enough to not see why some folks don't like it.

    Never take advice on moving somewhere from people who have only visited for a short time on vacation. They essentially know nothing. Living in a place and vacationing in a place are completely different things.

    Do keep in mind that these are small towns, families have lived here since the late 1800's and some folks don't like change. I wish it would stay just like it is but that's an unreasonable request. Cities grow and change or wither and die.

    BTW, I work a lot with city governments and I'm calling BS on the story by Honkinunit. Sorry my man but that doesn't smell right.

  37. #37
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    Bike Snob, there isn't much difference between living anywhere in the developed world. Someone who knows an area well from multiple trips knows about 80% of what happens there. Humans have rather redundant behaviors and have moved around enough to adopt common traits.

    One thing is clear to me after decades of travel and living in various places, those who stay in one place all their lives are very short of the tools needed to understand much about their own community. Well traveled people have much richer insights, although I don't include cruise ships, destination lodges, and that sort of thing as worthy of gaining insights.

    We have Rampage tickets so I'll again experience Virgin and St George :-)

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmpreston View Post
    Bike Snob, there isn't much difference between living anywhere in the developed world. Someone who knows an area well from multiple trips knows about 80% of what happens there. Humans have rather redundant behaviors and have moved around enough to adopt common traits.

    One thing is clear to me after decades of travel and living in various places, those who stay in one place all their lives are very short of the tools needed to understand much about their own community. Well traveled people have much richer insights, although I don't include cruise ships, destination lodges, and that sort of thing as worthy of gaining insights.

    We have Rampage tickets so I'll again experience Virgin and St George :-)
    Nah, you may think you know 80%, but in reality you know 20%, it's a little different

    We moved to a place that most folks ignore, Wenatchee WA, just over the hill from Seattle. In moving here I feel like I won the sweepstakes because at face view it's kinda crappy looking, but once you live here for a while it really grows on you and suddenly you start to see the things that make a community liveable.

    Anytime I talk to people who live in Seattle, they just stare at me when I tell them how great it is to live in Wenatchee. To a Seattleite, they only know Wenatchee by the strip development at the north end of town, where you turn to drive to Chelan.

    I have trails out the end of my driveway, skiing fifteen minutes door to door, in the winter I can snowbike and ski in my back yard, seven minute drive to work (soon to be five minutes by foot), lots of great summer riding, Seattle/Bellingham is less that three hours, BC riding is four hours, got a river in town, climbing gym being built, great schools, mix of liberal and conservative. Great place if you want the best of all worlds.

    Most places are like that, you can't see a place for what it is until you've been there for a while, made friends, established yourself, learned the quirks.

    We're heading to CC in April to scout it out, might just be helping to build those new trails in a few years

    And why move from wonderful Wenatchee? Both my kids live in SLC and the wife can't handle the distance and not seeing them monthly...

  39. #39
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    Nurse, nothing you describe changes my 80% estimate, even in say Central America or Russia. (Been there, done that.) We may be talking different measurement standards but I mean total knowledge. You wouldn't have to learn how to drive vastly differently, use the toilet (yes, regions differ), find restaurants, hotels, housing, do most jobs, ride a bike, etc.

    I should have qualified my statement but excepting those who go to resorts. They live in an enclosed environment that rarely reflects the surrounding area. I assume MTBers don't do much of that. We're with the locals when we travel.

    There are usually small nuances in different cultures that can sure appear big and minor local knowledge of locations and such. Still, if you think it through that isn't that much more knowledge to obtain. While learning another language is a big deal for most people it isn't that much more knowledge.

    A couple of hours on the Web and Google Maps and everything you saw you have around Wenatchee physically is known except for maybe a special waterfall or a cool coffee shop ambiance.

    Communities within cultures are very similar. Same old arguments. Same organizations and activities. The longer you live and the more you move the less there is to know with each move.

    I lived in Richland, WA and Seattle since you brought up WA. And other places and countries. I used to ski out of Wenatchee. Forget the name of the place.

    So you are dumping WA after they finally dumped state liquor stores for Utah and more state liquor stores :-) My knowledge of Cedar City is a Chevron, McDonalds, and Motel 6. It is a pit stop to and from Moab. I hung out in Parowan for a couple of days, something you may not bother doing :-)
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  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmpreston View Post
    ...

    So you are dumping WA after they finally dumped state liquor stores for Utah and more state liquor stores :-) My knowledge of Cedar City is a Chevron, McDonalds, and Motel 6. It is a pit stop to and from Moab. I hung out in Parowan for a couple of days, something you may not bother doing :-)
    Nah, mostly it's the kids, we moved her from TN after the last one went off to college in Utah. If it was just me, I'd see the kids every few months, but my wife is missing the kids a lot, so unless they move to the PNW, we have to move to the Southwest.

    It is a little cold and dark up here, that's not something I truly understood until moving here; I had lived in Eugene OR but that's not the PNW. I miss the winter light that I got down south, but I don't miss the rain. Believe it or not, East TN got much colder than Wenatchee, with lows in the single digits, whereas Wenatchee hasn't been colder that upper teens in the past three winters.

    I also have lived all over the USA and other parts of the world, so I get what you're saying about people and their issues being the same wherever you go, but living in a place is what makes it home, vacations will never recreate home as you only see the things that home is not.

    I have learned that I don't like cold as an old man, so I guess as a young man I just didn't care about it

    On a bright note, my heat tolerance is way up

  41. #41
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    Nurse Ben,

    As I got older I realized that the more locals think they are special the less they are. When you live outside of Seattle, even in Auburn, Seattle is the evil empire and the locals live in heaven. Pretty much the same everywhere. However, it seems that most Russians want to live in Moscow. They behave the same though but only to local big cities or save it for picking on other countries. That is the kind of nuances that travelers don't usually understand but also not important. I grew up in the Santa Cruz Mountains and San Jose was evil according my parents and other villagers.

    I had 20 years in the north. I've had enough of wet and cold. Silicon Valley is home now and we vacation in south Utah during the spring and fall.

    Seattle people used to ask me how I could have lived in Anchorage with the dark during the winter. Easy. In Anchorage you see the sun almost every day and northern lights at night. In Seattle the days are gray and often wet and the nights are starless for 8 months of the year. OK, 9 months.

    I suspect you'll really like CC. Pretty nice weather but access to lots of outdoor activities. Convenient to larger cities like SLT and Vegas, with my preference being Vegas. Not the diverse experiences of Seattle or SF though. What I miss in many places are good fine dining experiences. Love George's Corner in St. George and Bit and Spur in Sprindale.

    We'll be at the Hurricane MTB Festival in mid March.
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  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmpreston View Post
    ..

    We'll be at the Hurricane MTB Festival in mid March.
    If our April plans fall through, I was looking at the fest as an option.

    How big does it go?

    So the Valley, man, so many people! I was raised in Cupertino/Saratoga, back before the high tech stuff, when fruit orchards were the mainstay and malls were yet to be realized. I can't go back there, it's a foreign land to me now.

    When I think California, my only options would be something like Bishop or Mt Shasta.

  43. #43
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    The Hurricane festy is small, last year they had 3 or 4 bike manufacturer reps. This year they seem to have 9. It is slowly expanding but the OTE guys don't think the town fathers will let it get as big as Fruita. Maybe Outerbike will come to Virgin someday. More room out there at the Rampage staging site.

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    I'm a native of New Almaden in the Santa Cruz Mountains south of San Jose. Prunes, cots, cherries, walnuts... :-) I returned after living in the north 20 years. Very exciting for us entrepreneurs and techies. I could never move back to backwater towns. Yeah, Bishop is really nice! Not much MTB though, yet. The forest supervisor on the Inyo needs to be replaced if she hasn't been recently.
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  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    I have learned that I don't like cold as an old man, so I guess as a young man I just didn't care about it
    My feelings exactly. When I was in my 20's, Steamboat Springs was the the grand plan but the older I get, the less I want to deal with cold (5) months a year. Also, as much as I once loved to ski & snowboard, it's not as much of a priority any longer and mountain biking is. Hence, our trip to Prescott this past weekend where we decide to buy some land and will build there in 5-6 years. Pretty excited!!

    As far as CC, I've stopped there a few times to eat but it doesn't look too exciting. I guess the highlight would be you would be closer to Brian Head and the riding up in that area. If I wanted to be closer to SLC without paying Park City prices, I'd go to Ogden. They seem to have immersed themselves 110% in drawing the outdoorsy crowd. I can't remember from previous posts if you're LDS or not but I've had (2) co-workers move to CC to retire (not mountain bikers) and both left after less than 3-4 years as they said it was difficult to "fit in" and it wasn't easy to make friends within the LDS groups/clicks. They both ended up moving to Texas.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmpreston View Post
    The Hurricane festy is small, last year they had 3 or 4 bike manufacturer reps. This year they seem to have 9. It is slowly expanding but the OTE guys don't think the town fathers will let it get as big as Fruita. Maybe Outerbike will come to Virgin someday. More room out there at the Rampage staging site.

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    I'm a native of New Almaden in the Santa Cruz Mountains south of San Jose. Prunes, cots, cherries, walnuts... :-) I returned after living in the north 20 years. Very exciting for us entrepreneurs and techies. I could never move back to backwater towns. Yeah, Bishop is really nice! Not much MTB though, yet. The forest supervisor on the Inyo needs to be replaced if she hasn't been recently.
    I don't think it's a matter of them wanting it or not. I think it is more about space. There simply isn't a good place to do it like there is at the Brand trails trailhead in Moab.

    Sent from my Nexus 5X using Tapatalk

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by k2rider1964 View Post
    They both ended up moving to Texas.
    They went from Cedar City to Texas because they didn't feel like they fit in? Wow. CC must have been awful.

    Personally, I could not live in CC. But there are plenty of other places I would move other than Texas. In fact, having spent appx. 20 years of my life in Texas, I can affirmatively state that Texas would be at or very near the bottom of the list. Texas sucks.

  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by drboudreaux View Post
    They went from Cedar City to Texas because they didn't feel like they fit in? Wow. CC must have been awful.

    Personally, I could not live in CC. But there are plenty of other places I would move other than Texas. In fact, having spent appx. 20 years of my life in Texas, I can affirmatively state that Texas would be at or very near the bottom of the list. Texas sucks.
    Guess it depends on what you want to do and what you're interested in. These co-workers both wanted a ranch and to run cattle so Texas is a great place to be. I know quite a few great MTB riders that live in North Texas and are FAST. I have a ton of relatives in Texas but couldn't handle the heat to live there year round. My daughter is an Army nurse and stationed in San Antonio and absolutely loves all the outdoor opportunities in the state.

    I haven't been to Kansas City or Memphis but as far as I'm concerned, Texas has the best BBQ on the planet.

  48. #48
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    I wonder where deadbolt eventually moved to.
    Who's in charge, the thinker or the thought?

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    Just to pick things up a little... both my kids live in SLC and I expect that at least one will stay there, so we're going to follow them cuz that's what "good parents" do; well, that's what my wife insists we do

    A couple years ago I moved from East TN to the Central Cascades, mostly to get away from the humidity, bit also to have bigger riding. Unfortunately I didn't realize how much I would miss year round riding; I used to ride after work three or four times a week.

    In theory, I can have year round riding if it includes snowbiking and driving two hours to Seattle for mud riding. Snow biking is not mountain biking, quite honestly I'd rather ski or board. Mud riding is the same as I had in TN, but now I drive two hours for that pleasure.

    I now realize that I can work around dry heat much easier than I can work around snow and rain by riding late or early, riding in the shade, but I sill need a place to cool off in the summer and a place to warm up in the winter. My new "wisdom" is to move somewhere that has a little elevation (3-4000') for summer cooling, but is within striking distance (read as less than an hour) to warmer "non snow" riding.

    Cedar City might work, Flagstaff is another possibility, very different places.

    I know there's no perfect place, but if I could pick up Wenatchee and plop it down in Southern Utah, add a little elevation (4000'), and keep it the same culturally, that would be a nice place.

  50. #50
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    I'm just going to nit pick here. Snow biking is absolutely mountain biking.
    I'm a mountain bike guide in southwest Utah

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post

    I now realize that I can work around dry heat much easier than I can work around snow and rain by riding late or early, riding in the shade, but I sill need a place to cool off in the summer and a place to warm up in the winter. My new "wisdom" is to move somewhere that has a little elevation (3-4000') for summer cooling, but is within striking distance (read as less than an hour) to warmer "non snow" riding.
    I'm telling' ya....Prescott, AZ. 5000' elevation. Average high of 89 in July, Highs in the 50's in January, average of 11" of snow and none of it sticks, 22" of rain. 400 miles of trails, high desert riding, mountain riding, best IMBA group I've seen. 45 miles to Sedona, 90 to PHX or Flagstaff, 2 hours to the Grand Canyon. Seriously, if you are on Facebook, start following Prescott Mountain Bike Alliance to see how active & organized they are. They have more women show up on a ladies ride that most places have for a men's ride.

    Unfortunately, you'd be 8 hours from Salt Lake so not really close to your kids.

  52. #52
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    Anyone want to ride with me this coming week? I'm thinking friday or saturday. Just doing a solo riding trip. Anything helps! PM me thanks

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    Quote Originally Posted by slimphatty View Post
    Anyone want to ride with me this coming week? I'm thinking friday or saturday. Just doing a solo riding trip. Anything helps! PM me thanks
    Over the Edge does a shop ride every Saturday. Pretty decent pace overall and worth checking out.

  54. #54
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    Quote Originally Posted by k2rider1964 View Post
    I'm telling' ya....Prescott, AZ. 5000' elevation. Average high of 89 in July, Highs in the 50's in January, average of 11" of snow and none of it sticks, 22" of rain. 400 miles of trails, high desert riding, mountain riding, best IMBA group I've seen. 45 miles to Sedona, 90 to PHX or Flagstaff, 2 hours to the Grand Canyon. Seriously, if you are on Facebook, start following Prescott Mountain Bike Alliance to see how active & organized they are. They have more women show up on a ladies ride that most places have for a men's ride.

    Unfortunately, you'd be 8 hours from Salt Lake so not really close to your kids.
    Well, we did the grand tour, Moab, Cortez, Sedona/Flag, St George/Hurricane/Cedar City.

    Cortez is more our cup of tea, small, trees, can get snowy and cold, but the riding choices are pretty sweet and it's remote enough that it's not likely to be built out any time soon. Downside: no jobs.

    So, about northern Arizona, wow, I think people who live there must be used to the traffic and crowds cuz that's what there is in that area. Phoenix, Vegas, California are just loving the area to death. I had fun riding, but enough was enough about the time we finally got through Flag. My idea of small town doesn't fit in northern Arizona. I'm sure Prescott is nice, but small it's not.

    St George, well, it certainly has a lot of strip development
    The riding is top shelf, I mean you can ride Zen after work, how f'n awesome is that?! Of course it gets smokin hot, but the winters are gonna be sweet. The wife didn't like the town, it's way to bland, it lacks any quirkiness whatsoever. Oh, but for teh riding...

    Cedar City, I liked it, the college is growing, the town is gradually becoming quirky, but the wife pulled the plug saying the highway through town didn't do it for her. I also think she was burned out on the lack of good vibes from having been in St George for a few days.

    So there you have it, nothing definitive, Cedar City if my wife get's over herself, Cortez if we can get jobs.

    My gut feeling is we're gonna end up on the wet side of the Cascades (Bellingham), down in Bend, or Grand Junction.
    Bellingham has some cool dirt riding, but I prefer natural features.
    Bend has a lot of flat riding, if I was older it'd be more enticing.
    I don't like the heat in Grand Junction, but I can ride early or late in the summer to beat it, and for the kind of riding I want, the Southwest is the only place.

    So, Grand Junction.

    Oh, as to the riding, my three fav trails from the tour: Phils World, Goosberry Mesa, Zen. Phils is just plan fun and varied, I don't think I coudl ever tire of that place. Goosberry is incredible, though different from Phils, and hard to access, a definite bucket list. Zen is the kind of ride everyone should have in their back yard. Combined with the downhill on the backside, whicj I looped with Zen, it was a great ride in all ways..though a bit windy; storm blew through.

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Silentfoe View Post
    I'm just going to nit pick here. Snow biking is absolutely mountain biking.
    No, it's really not, there are too many limitations.

    I ride single track snow trails, they need to be pretty flowy and well banked to appreciate any speed or control.

    Fire roads and groomed trails are not mountain biking unless you are a senior citizen..

    Fat biking is to mountain biking, what XC skiing is to telemark skiing.

  56. #56
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    Thanks for reporting back! Nice analysis. I agree on Grand Junction. Holy Cross and Eagles Wing at the Lunch Loops across the river are just as exciting and challenging as Zen, at least for me. If you want a small quirky town I suspect that Fruita would qualify.

    GJ / Fruita / Loma / Mack have fast access to Crested Butte, Durango, Moab, and Cortez. They also have an epic trail planned. Not much snow and doesn't stick around. I ride in the summer by being off the trails by 11 AM.

    Hope this works out for you!
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  57. #57
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nurse Ben View Post
    No, it's really not, there are too many limitations.

    I ride single track snow trails, they need to be pretty flowy and well banked to appreciate any speed or control.

    Fire roads and groomed trails are not mountain biking unless you are a senior citizen..

    Fat biking is to mountain biking, what XC skiing is to telemark skiing.
    No, it really is. If not, you're doing it wrong.
    I'm a mountain bike guide in southwest Utah

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    Seems like we would get along well with our riding habits. I've always said that Phil's World in Cortez is the best designed riding area I've ever ridden. Like you said, you can ride it in so many different combinations that it would be hard to get tired of it. Heading to St George myself in a few weeks for trip #2 this year. Taking some folks out that haven't ridden Little Creek or JEM so we'll hit those for sure. They did Zen, Boy Scout and Church Rocks last year. I love, love, love, the lower chunky, up & down section of Zen. Keeps you on your toes as you have to be ready for anything.

    As far as Prescott, it depends on where you are. Prescott proper has a smaller town vibe with mom & pop type shops but is very popular with tourists but the "big city" feel with all the national chains is actually Prescott Valley. We'll be building the opposite direction of Prescott Valley and 8 miles northwest of Prescott itself in a 600+ acre development that will have 215 total homes max...if they ever get built out. It's off a 2 lane country road and the only business out that way is one gas station/convenience store.

    I like GJ but it gets way hot (100+) in the summer and cold in the winter. I'm also not a huge fan of pretty much no trees in any of the riding areas. I really like the town of Palisade just east of GJ. Small enough to be "out there" but close enough to get into GJ if you need anything major.

    The main corridor thru Cortez gets ugly busy as well on weekends. I deal with it every year on our trip to Durango It's busier than anything I've experienced in Prescott yet for sure. Just as long as you live outside the core downtown area of Cortez, it can be beautiful but downtown Cortez itself is a couple steps away from being Amarillo, TX.
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