Paging Moab locals- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Paging Moab locals

    Now that your temps have reached 104+ on a daily basis do you who live there year-round ride like normal? Normal meaning a lot, if that's what you do in the cooler months. Do you have to get out before sun up to get in a ride? Is it just no big deal, this killer heat and all? I'm not asking because I'm thinking of coming out (I do that in March and October)...just asking.

    I guess that's what the La Sals are there for, now that I think about it. I was just wondering about Porc and Rockstacker and Sovereign and such.

  2. #2
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    July is absolutely my least favorite month in Moab, as it is reliably more than 100 degrees every single day, and generally offers none of the transient respite from the heat (occasional cloudy days and plentiful thunderstorms) that August does. Even mountain rides are best done in the morning, as the La Sals and Abajos both get afternoon cell development that can lead to lightning. Mornings down in town are in the seventies until about 9:00, then the eighties until about 11:00, so the desert rides are doable, but you can't dilly dally.

    About those mountain rides...

    I have two good rides in the La Sals that I do, and one in the Abajos about an hour south. They are not Colorado (this ain't CB), but they are good. Tomorrow morning I'm going to go do a few laps of Moonlight Meadow. My other little training ride I call the SHSHHK Loop, starts at about 7,200, climbs the Sand Flats Road to the Loop Road, climbs Hazard to Warner Lake, drops down Schuman Gulch towards Oowah Lake, climbs back up to Warner Lake on Ho Chi Minh, then descends Hazard and Kokopelli back the TH. Of course, the most unique summertime and early fall experience is Burro Down, the vertical mile and a half over about 28 miles, from treeline to river. It's difficult to do that in July because Porcupine is just too hot by the time you get to it, but September is perfect.

    I have adjusted my sleep schedule accordingly such that I go to bed by 9:00 and am up by 5:00, so as to take advantage of the best part of the day.

    The difference between here and the "real desert" (such as Phoenix), is not only that the temp is about 5-10 degrees cooler at its peak, but that the hundred degree weather only consistently lasts for about two months, as opposed to five months.

    hfly

  3. #3
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    Wink So--you wouldn't advise Rockstacker/Jacksons starting about 11 am?

    Just kidding of course. No matter how much water you'd bring they'd find your shriveled body sometime in September when the next rider would go out there. And that's quite a training ride you describe. Do you go all the way up Sand Flats from town? Jeez, hfly, you'd be toast by the time you got to any decent elevation.

    And--highs in Death Valley today through Thursday are 124-129 degrees and lows in the low 90s. I wonder if there's any riding to be had there...at all...ever.

    A friend did Burro Down in late June last year (and was able to bag Upper Porc before they officially closed it). Amazingly it was rainy and temps in the high 80s. He couldn't believe there was that type of riding at the higher elevations.

  4. #4
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    I just returned from 4 days in Moab. Day 1 - rode up Amasa and down Rockstacker/Jackson. Day 2 - rode Slickrock. Day 3 - rode Porcy. Day 4 - rode Sovereign. Started at 6am each day and finished between 11 am and 12 noon. From Phoenix so it was NICE!!!

  5. #5
    Andykiller
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    Where we ride in the summer is at high elevations. The temperatures are about 72 degrees and the air is thin. A lot of the trails are not well known because it is mostly the locals that ride them. The tourists have no idea that you can ride in the summer so they stay away from Moab. Anyone that rides in the lower desert is crazy and is really missing some of the best riding that moab has to offer.

    chow

  6. #6
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    Hey folks, I am a tourist who doesn't ride much, but I'm relocating from NYC to CA in August. Driving cross-country w/ bike on board, so it would be a shame not to ride in some of the obligatory spots along the way. That includes Moab, of course. It sounds like it may be feasible for me, an acclimated northerner, to do some short rides as long as I'm done before noon, and ideally on the occasionally cloudy day? True?
    Never been to the southwest, so not sure what to expect climate-wise. I just assumed as an out-of-towner, as Andykiller says, riding in Utah/AZ/low elevs would be overruled by the heat.

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