Moving out of Utah?!?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 22 of 22
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    316

    Moving out of Utah?!?

    Not that anyone would ever consider moving. . .

    . . . but if you did leave Utah, what other mtb/outdoor recreation meccas would you consider moving to?

  2. #2
    JMH
    JMH is offline
    Sugary Exoskeleton
    Reputation: JMH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    4,659
    I left Utah for Seattle. Moved from Seattle to Los Angeles. Now I am back in Utah.

    Seattle has good riding, slow and technical and fun, but the weather is unacceptable. Los Angeles had good riding too. Rocky and fast, and the weather is agreeable. Why avoid Socal? Sharing trails with 20,000,000 people. You have never seen such user conflicts.

    But if rain and trailjerks don't scare you, they are both great.

    JMH

    Quote Originally Posted by ucme4dk
    Not that anyone would ever consider moving. . .

    . . . but if you did leave Utah, what other mtb/outdoor recreation meccas would you consider moving to?

  3. #3
    rolls on 26's
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
    Posts
    128
    hmm... i'd go with socal, norcal, or the interior of BC, i like fast trails and from what I've heard the trails are fast in those areas

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    316
    Thanks, JMH.

    Those are good reasons I would avoid those areas. In my profession, as I understand it, it is much easier to make a living and have time/money left over after the necessities are taken care of outside of Utah.

    The problem is I can't think of anywhere that offers the recreation possibilites that Utah does, has the amenities (airport, major hospitals, arts/music, etc.) and access to so many other great places (i.e., Jackson, Grand Canyon, Wind Rivers, etc.

    Oh well.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: steadyflow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,121
    Lived in Utah for 10 years, now live in Golden, CO and love it. The skiing is not nearly as good here, but the riding in Colorado blows Utah away...IMO. So much more here and a big chunk of it is connected by the Colorado Trail. Plus I have access to great riding from my front door. Don't get me wrong I have riden some amazing trails in Utah....but Colorado is endless. Plus Denver is a much better city than SLC, much more to do here without the "influence" that is present there.

  6. #6
    Bend, OR
    Reputation: Ross W.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    620
    Arizona. F yeah.

    I'm trying to move to Flagstaff for the summer. Riding will be saaweet.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    316
    Norcal has looked appealing. Denver hasn't for some reason, not sure why. Does Denver really have endless trails or does it just seem that way? Are the readily accessible trails more "local" knowledge than what is found in guidebooks? From where I live, I can be at many, many trailheads within 40 minutes. And there are quite a few within 20 mintues.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bleu's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    344
    Portland...Vancouver...Stuttgart.

    Denver depends on where you live. Too grody and midwesty for my tastes.
    It's just frustrating sometimes being an Athena...

  9. #9
    JMH
    JMH is offline
    Sugary Exoskeleton
    Reputation: JMH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    4,659
    True dat. Denver is definitely under the influence of the Great Plains, Pizza Dipping Sauce and Type 2 Diabetes.

    ucme4dk- I find it hard to believe that ANY of these places would be cheaper than Utah. Granted, I don't know your line of work. But the cost of living is so much higher ANYWHERE west of here that I can't imagine that even a commensurate increase in salary would leave you any better off. Okay, maybe Elko or Ely Nevada would be cheaper.

    JMH



    Denver depends on where you live. Too grody and midwesty for my tastes.[/QUOTE]

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: steadyflow's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    1,121
    Quote Originally Posted by ucme4dk
    Norcal has looked appealing. Denver hasn't for some reason, not sure why. Does Denver really have endless trails or does it just seem that way? Are the readily accessible trails more "local" knowledge than what is found in guidebooks? From where I live, I can be at many, many trailheads within 40 minutes. And there are quite a few within 20 mintues.
    Anywhere from a 20 minutes to an hour drive from downtown Denver there is so much single track and that doesn't even include the resort areas in the high country. If you live in Golden....then there is riding right from town. I can do anywhere from a 1 hour ride to a 5-6 hour ride right from my front door. It is just so vast here; when I lived in Utah a 20 to 25 mile ride was a big day...here the norm is 30+ mile rides, often times pushing out 40 to 50 mile rides.

    I have been here two years now and found plenty of infomation here on mtbr and now I am familiar with many of the major riding areas; however, as you become more familiar with an area you realize how much more there is that you haven't riden.

    Don't get me wrong the riding in the Wasatch is excellent, but the Wasatch is a very tight mountain range...the Front Range is huge, just the Front Range foothills alone are enough to keep you busy for a long time.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    316
    Ely. . . mmmmmmm.

    Yeah, cost of living is also an issue. Utah still seems to be at or below the national average. Perhaps I need to buck up and become better at problem solving/more competitive.

    There are folks in my line of work (hint, my username) that, with the same amount of effort/time at work, make near double what they did in Utah. With that in mind, the options become a) work the same amount and retire early, b) work less and enjoy life more. Or, stay in Utah. If I could earn in Utah what my colleagues in other states earn, then I wouldn't even raise the question.

  12. #12
    JMH
    JMH is offline
    Sugary Exoskeleton
    Reputation: JMH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    4,659
    I can certainly empathize with your concerns. My wife and I own our own business, and the issues of Work vs. Pay vs. Leisure vs. Expenses are a constant topic with us.

    I don't know quite what to tell you, but I can give some examples that we experienced when we moved from SoCal. Our rent came down by 25% and we are in a larger, nicer place. Our health insurance in SLC is 50% cheaper. Our auto insurance went down by 35%. On those three items alone, we are saving over 20k. And unless you can seriously entertain paying over 600k for a home, you can forget about living someplace cool in CA.

    So maybe you could make twice as much somewhere else. But it is absolutely amazing how much cost of living, taxes and insurance eat up when you are talking about living somewhere on the coast, so do your best to factor all those things in! Living in most cities on the coast also means sitting in traffic. If you spend an hour commuting each way to work, that's an extra 40hr week every month that you wasted. Factor that in when considering your extra earning power.

    Not to discourage you. I enjoyed living in Seattle and enjoyed LA even more. But don't be tempted purely by the lure of a bigger salary. You will be shocked at the end of the day by how far it doesn't go.

    JMH

    Quote Originally Posted by ucme4dk
    Yeah, cost of living is also an issue. Utah still seems to be at or below the national average. Perhaps I need to buck up and become better at problem solving/more competitive. There are folks in my line of work (hint, my username) that, with the same amount of effort/time at work, make near double what they did in Utah. With that in mind, the options become a) work the same amount and retire early, b) work less and enjoy life more. Or, stay in Utah. If I could earn in Utah what my colleagues in other states earn, then I wouldn't even raise the question.

  13. #13
    I railed it like Kong
    Reputation: Arkon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    637
    I moved from the Phoenix area and AZ has everything outdoors you could want within a few hours drive. Plus year round riding. And real year round riding- none of this 20 degrees in the winter (St George now) crap.

    I miss the 4 weeks of 40's and then back to the 60-70's again. I'm such a wuss...
    I'm UNIQUE... just like everybody else.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    316
    JMH,

    Wow! Great things to be thinking about. Things I had thought about, but couldn't put numbers to. I really appreciate the input.

    Tried Phoenix, too hot in the May to Oct "summer" months. Work is good there. Riding is good. But in my limited exposure, Utah has more accessible recreation with greater variety. I like it better.

  15. #15
    Bored Carp
    Reputation: chuky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    1,596
    Phoenix also has the only traffic I would ever compare to LA's traffic. I particularly love the 10 at rush hour.

    :-)

    C
    I only attempt to change the world in the appropriate World-Changing venues and forums.

  16. #16
    I railed it like Kong
    Reputation: Arkon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    637
    Yeah, no fun living in the Auwatukee area or south of it. At rush hour you have to be carpooling to get anywhere in a reasonable amount of time if you're crossing town.

    But i would argue the accessible recreation. You've got mexico beaches to 12K ft mountains within hours of you. Though Utah does have some cool stuff that we never had, like slickrock. Maybe i need to see more of Utah.

    Summer does get brutal till your used to it. Night riding at 90 degrees was our standard for about 2 months. July and August. I tried riding mid-day once in late July and turned around after 1 1/2 miles. I thought i was going to die.
    I'm UNIQUE... just like everybody else.

  17. #17
    JMH
    JMH is offline
    Sugary Exoskeleton
    Reputation: JMH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    4,659
    Yeah, I lived in Phoenix when I was a kid and I never thought of it as insanely hot. I guess we just got used to it. Same with Las Vegas when I lived there.

    But now? NO WAY would I want to live in either place. I can't handle it anymore.

    JMH

  18. #18
    mtbr member
    Reputation: Poncharelli's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    2,647
    I'm a Utah transplant from El paso, texas. If I had to move, I would consider Las Cruces, New Mexico.

    It's a great town: New Mexico State University is there, relatively low cost of living, great food, big town with small town feel, the Dona Ana Trails are awesome, affordable housing, skiing is close by in Riodoso, road biking is great, all-year round riding, Alburquerque and El Paso are not too far, good alpine mountain biking in close-by Cloudcroft, White Sands Missile Range had been hiring quite a bit, etc.

    It got voted by BIKE magazine as a top biking town for some city-size catagory. Can't remember.

    If I had to leave Utah, that's the town I would consider.

  19. #19
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    316
    Ponch,

    Thanks for the tip. New Mexico is also a good place for dentists. It's also been on my radar and good to hear someone mention it. With your encouragement, I'm going to look at it a little closer.

    Got a job lead in Alaska, but I don't think I could handle it up there. Too cold and dark in the winter! New Mexico sounds warmer, not quite as bad as Phoenix. Spent three weeks living and working in Phoenix 2 years ago while I was training for the E100. Too hot and too much traffic.

    Thanks for all the great input! It's more than I anticipated and I appreciate it!

  20. #20
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    39
    Depends on what you consider 'recreation' If I were single I would buy myself a little Z4, move to Austin, TX and poach nubile college chicks!

    We are moving out of SLC because we are unhappy with the public schools. So the "where to move" has been an ongoing topic at my house. We moved from San Antonio - we really enjoyed it there but Texas in general has nowhere near the outdoor opportunities of Utah.

    My office is actually based in Colorado Springs, and I'm gaining some traction with the wife to go there. The class sizes seem reasonable, and obviously the cycling scene is awesome. I have spent a lot of time there for work, it's not a bad little city - at all.

  21. #21
    JMH
    JMH is offline
    Sugary Exoskeleton
    Reputation: JMH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    4,659
    Aw come on! I myself was only one year behind after attending public elementary here... basically had to catch up on a year of math at home from my parents when we moved and I started 6th grade in Vegas.

    The funny part? We only lived in Utah for two years! I was a year behind after only two years of school in Farmington.

    JMH


    Quote Originally Posted by TnTaylor
    We are moving out of SLC because we are unhappy with the public schools.

  22. #22
    mtbr member
    Reputation: KRob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    12,055
    Quote Originally Posted by ucme4dk
    Ely. . . mmmmmmm.
    Ely has got it going on. Funky, scruffy, small town vibe. Amazingly open, endless, untrammeled potential and some pretty decent established trails as well. If you like just taking a jeep road and trying to see where it goes ( and I know you do) it's hard to beat. And, don't forget, it's "The Middle of Everywhere". 6-8 hours in any direction gets you to some amazing places.... and in the winter (if you don't bc ski) you'll need to.

    It lacks most of what many people like (shopping, culture, things to do, etc) and it's certainly not for everyone (thank goodness), but Nevada certainly pays professionals better than Utah and the cost of living is still pretty reasonable. Nice 4-5 bedroom homes can be had for under $300,000 if you can find one.

    You missed your opportunity though. We just had a new dentist (I finally got your handle) move in last year and bought an existing practice. There's one other well established dentist and a guy who dinks around abit. Maybe there's room for one more.

    Edit: But if you're well established in the St. George(?) area I can't imagine wanting to leave. I think I would love to live in St. George. So much to offer and so much excellent riding near by.
    Last edited by KRob; 03-06-2007 at 09:30 AM.
    I will cause thee to ride upon the high places of the earth...
    Isaiah 58:14

    www.stuckinthespokes.com

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.