Living in Park City or Heber?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Living in Park City or Heber?

    I just moved to Salt Lake from Phoenix and I must say, the amount of pollution, particularly air pollution, here has me concerned. I'm thinking the only solution is to move to Park City or Heber but the housing looks kind of scarce up there. Anyone know of any other parts of the region that might be pollution free? I was thinking maybe Eagle Mountain but not really sure. I have 3 young kids and don't want them to suffer from long-term effects of pollution.

  2. #2
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    We are moving to PC in 2 weeks for that exact reason. I see no evidence that anything will get done about the air quality in the near future and I'm not going to take risks with my kids health, so we are sucking it up and spending way too much on a house up there. It's a shame, SLC is perfect in a lot of other ways and we really like it here during the fall and spring. The winter particulates and summer ozone make it unacceptable, though.

    If you're on a budget Summit Park is a little cheaper than PC proper but still not cheap by any means. Good luck.

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  3. #3
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    Eagle mountain is a good option.
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    Heber still gets inversion creeping in from Provo. PC, Summit Park and if you aren't redneck averse, Kamas. We moved to Kamas a little over a year ago and it is about as good as it gets in N. Utah. 10 minutes to a PC trailhead, Uintas out the back door for empty explorable terrain, 4.5 million acres of it, and tons of great road riding most of the year. Oh and 0 inversion.

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    Would you say that the pollution in Heber is about the same as Eagle Mountain? Maybe you don't know. Also, I imagine that Kamas doesn't have alot of homes for rent.

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    Thumbs up for the Heber/Midway area - riding season last longer than Park City in the Fall and comes a month earlier in the Spring. Inversion is non-existent for the most part, only during the worst spells do we get a little creeping up Provo Cyn. Beauty is that you can buy a decent place for what you'd spend in PC for rent too.

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    Depends on your pricepoint really. I sell real estate up here (this isn't a pitch) but I'd be glad to give you some honest feedback on places up here. My wife and I were considering purchasing a place in the valley as well but just couldn't handle it with how much better the air is year round up here. The most affordable would be Kamas and Heber. Next step up Midway and some outer areas of Park City. Just depends on what you need.
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  8. #8
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    The inversion is better in Heber than it is in Eagle Mountain. We are several hundred feet above the typical inversion but it's still here, just not nearly as bad. I can see it as I drive down through it. I think of it this way though, of the 12 months in a year, we usually have less than 1 total of inversion. I totally forget about it by mid to late March.
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    If possible, going further out and up north to Huntsville/Eden outside of Ogden you get minimal inversion and it's a whole lot cheaper than the PC area. Not to mention no trail and ski crowds up there. But it's not a good option for a regular commuter to SLC area although there is the Frontrunner from Ogden.

  10. #10
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    I grew up in Hoytsville, which is off of I-80 a little ways past Park City. Great small community with lots of outdoorsy things to. I would hang my hat there again if I ever got the chance.
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  11. #11
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    Its too bad Park City isn't more affordable. I guess its all of those out of town celebrities that drive the prices up. Actually, the housing is surprisingly expensive everywhere in Salt Lake compared to Phoenix. We were renting a house for $1,000/month but up here you need at least $1200/month to rent a house. The Jeremy Ranch/ Summit Park area looks a bit cheaper, but, being so close to the mouth of the canyon, I wonder if those areas might get some of the inversion crawling up the canyon?

  12. #12
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    JR is pricey. Summit Park is cheaper, Pinebrook is sort of in the middle. If you $1200/mo to rent a house seems steep to you... you are not going to want to live up there.

    The inversion does not make it past Mtn. Dell (about halfway up the canyon) in my experience. If it gets to Jeremy/Pinebrook then it'll get all of Park City - which is also in a valley, just at higher altitude. I think that is actually topographically impossible, though, since the whole problem is that the cold air sits on the valley floor and traps the pollutants. If it rises, all's well, no more inversion.

    -Walt

    Quote Originally Posted by BCTJ View Post
    Its too bad Park City isn't more affordable. I guess its all of those out of town celebrities that drive the prices up. Actually, the housing is surprisingly expensive everywhere in Salt Lake compared to Phoenix. We were renting a house for $1,000/month but up here you need at least $1200/month to rent a house. The Jeremy Ranch/ Summit Park area looks a bit cheaper, but, being so close to the mouth of the canyon, I wonder if those areas might get some of the inversion crawling up the canyon?

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    Quote Originally Posted by BCTJ View Post
    The Jeremy Ranch/ Summit Park area looks a bit cheaper, but, being so close to the mouth of the canyon, I wonder if those areas might get some of the inversion crawling up the canyon?
    Just moved up to Pinebrook this past summer because of the air pollution. I don't quite understand how anyone could compare Heber's pollution to that of Eagle Mountain with a straight face; Eagle Mountain, while higher than the valley floor, is still in the valley which traps the pollution. Heber only gets it when the winds carry pollution up canyon, a much better and much more rare situation.

    Only on a couple days this past year (which I read somewhere ranked as the highest number of "inversion" days of all time) did the pollution haze ever make it all the way up canyon to Pinebrook and Kimball Junction. I'll take those odds any day to avoid the pollution. Typically the bad air doesn't reach past East Canyon. I do miss the city sometimes, I miss the view of LCC out of our backyard quite a lot, but Park City and the surrounding area is a great place to live; worth the sacrifice of the price tag if you're able.
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  14. #14
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    Not arguing the difference between Heber and Eagle Mountain inversion but just pointing out that Eagle Mountain is NOT in the valley. There are hills between us, putting us in a different valley. We are also up wind of where the inversion gets trapped. I will never claim we don't get inversion, just that we get a lot less of it
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    Quote Originally Posted by Silentfoe View Post
    Not arguing the difference between Heber and Eagle Mountain inversion but just pointing out that Eagle Mountain is NOT in the valley. There are hills between us, putting us in a different valley. We are also up wind of where the inversion gets trapped. I will never claim we don't get inversion, just that we get a lot less of it
    Well consider the difference in size between the Oquirrh and Wasatch ranges and "point of the mountain"; there's no way to escape the pollution when you're in the valley, even if you're higher and therefore experiencing a lower concentration than you might if you were at the low point of the Great Salt Lake. My point was that I think the comparison between Eagle Mountain and Heber is much different than it was made out to be in the post earlier.
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    There are a couple of other areas to consider in the search. If you like more open space and more daylight Silver Creek has larger lots and more sunshine then both Summit Park( aka Summit Dark) or Pinebrook. Both Summit Park and Pinebrook are North facing and receive very little sunshine in the winter months. They are in the pines if that is what you like but they are shady. Silver Creek is a little more of a rural area and is horse friendly. It is also more affordable than Park City proper and only a couple minutes away. Also, the Trailside/ Highland Estate neighborhood is worth looking into. It is comparable to Pinebrook in price but has more sunshine throughout the year. Both areas are in the Park City School District and both have riding options out your back door.
    Good luck in your search.

  17. #17
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    deleted for fear of trail side assault...

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    We moved to Sniderville Basin (Highland Estates) 3 years ago. SO worth it. We can ride right out our back door, even on fat bikes in winter. Blue skies most days in winter. No inversion but often cold in the morning.
    It is more expensive than the valley, but the lifestyle is worth it.

  19. #19
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    Personally I'm fine with Park City/Heber but my wife thinks it too far from the Valley. I noticed one spot in the Valley called Suncrest - its down near the Point of the Mountain in Draper. It's elevation is 6,000 feet, which would be above the inversion. However, I'm also worried about the summertime ozone, which is also quite high in the Valley. Does anyone happen to know if Ozone makes it up that far or if it also accumulates down in the Valley. Suncrest would get us above the inverstion but I'm not sure about the ozone. Also, I've read that the ground is a bit unstable up there? Thanks again for any assistance.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BCTJ View Post
    Personally I'm fine with Park City/Heber but my wife thinks it too far from the Valley. I noticed one spot in the Valley called Suncrest - its down near the Point of the Mountain in Draper. It's elevation is 6,000 feet, which would be above the inversion. However, I'm also worried about the summertime ozone, which is also quite high in the Valley. Does anyone happen to know if Ozone makes it up that far or if it also accumulates down in the Valley. Suncrest would get us above the inverstion but I'm not sure about the ozone. Also, I've read that the ground is a bit unstable up there? Thanks again for any assistance.
    Does your wife have a job lined up or in mind? I will add that my commute time decreased when I moved from Sandy to Park City. It takes me less time and there is less traffic going up Parleys than there is heading through the middle of the valley. Of course, average commute times are some of the lowest in the entire country in SLC so take that for what you will.

    Hard, reliable data numbers are difficult to find to the level of Suncrest vs Draper for example. I would have a hard time believing that the ozone and inversion levels are appreciably better until you get physically separated from the valley floor. Up-canyon winds will bring the air pollution into the Wasatch back but the vast majority of pollution produced is in the valley. So until you separate yourself from the production I would have trouble believing that you'll be much better off in any particular location in the valley. However the higher you are in the valley the lower the concentration of any polluted air should be. So higher, in this case, should be better and better should be good enough for anyone without young children or elderly or sensitive persons in their family.
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    Just a FYI addressing the question on Ozone levels in Summit County. I grew up in the Salt Lake Valley but have lived in Summit County for the past 20 years. The commute to Salt Lake from Park City to SLC is 20 min on most days. The quality of life is well worth that in my opinion. Good luck on your search and wherever you settle there will be riding near by.
    Summit County ozone levels on the rise
    Wind blowing pollutants from Salt Lake City through Parleys Canyon
    Caroline Kingsley, The Park Record
    POSTED: 04/05/2013 04:41:52 PM MDT2 COMMENTS

    Summit County ozone levels are increasing, according to a report recently released by the Utah Department of Environmental Quality.
    "Ozone concentrations in Summit County, at least in the Park City area, were similar to what we see in Salt Lake City," said Seth Arens, Department of Environmental Quality environmental scientist, at a Summit County Council meeting on Wednesday. "On most days that it was high in Salt Lake City, it was also high in Summit County. In fact, there were more moderately high ozone days in Summit County than in Salt Lake City."

    Department of Environmental Quality has been monitoring ozone levels in Summit County since 2010. The highest levels of ozone last year were found in Parleys Summit, Snyderville Basin and Silver Summit.

    The sites monitored in Summit County included Parleys Summit, Jeremy Ranch, Snyderville Basin, Park City, Silver Summit and Kamas.

    The national standard for ozone levels is 75 parts per billion (ppb). Parleys Summit exceeded 75 ppb 10 days in 2012, with Snyderville Basin and Silver Summit trailing behind, with seven days of more than 75 ppb.

    Salt Lake City also exceeded the federal standard on seven days last year.

    Arens said the national standard will likely be soon lowered to between 60 and 70 ppb.

    "If you look at the number of days greater than 70 parts per billion, there were more days that exceeded it in Silver Summit compared to Salt Lake City," Arens said. "If the national standard is lowered, Summit County will likely be put into a nonattainment area. And there's probably not a lot of ways to avoid that from what we've seen so far."

    Nonattainment areas are places where pollutants exceed the regulated levels of ozone.

    Wind patterns suggest that Parleys Canyon appears to be a corridor for the movement of air masses from Salt Lake City to Summit County, Arens added.

    At 1 p.m. on Aug. 12, 2012, Salt Lake City reached a peak ozone concentration of 104 ppb.

    "It was already quite elevated in the Summit County area with values in the 80s," he said. "At 3 p.m., the ozone was decreasing in Salt Lake City with 83 ppb."

    During the same hour, Parleys Summit reached a peak of 94 ppb with elevated levels at other sites.

    4 p.m., ozone began to decrease at Parleys Summit and Jeremy Ranch, while Snyderville Basin and Silver Summit reached their peak ozone levels for the day.

    "And by 5 p.m., ozone started to decrease everywhere and reached a max concentration in Kamas," Arens said. "By looking at ozone data in this manner, it appears there is transport of ozone from Salt Lake City all the way to Kamas."

    Like PM2.5, fine particles in the air measuring 2.5 micrometers or less that cause inversion in the winter, ozone is a secondary pollutant that is strongest during the summer.

    "That means ozone is not emitted from a tailpipe or a smokestack," he said. "It's formed through complex chemical reactions in the atmosphere from nitrogen oxide and volatile organic compounds in the presence of strong sunlight. So even if you have all the right atmosphere chemistry going on, you aren't going to get a lot of ozone formation because you need a lot of ultraviolet radiation and sunlight to catalyze the reaction."

    The increased levels of solar radiation at higher elevations could be a contributing factor to Summit County's ozone levels, Arens said.

    "Since we sit about 2,000 feet higher than Salt Lake City, there is higher solar radiation," he said. "I found solar radiation here at Park City was almost 60 percent higher than Salt Lake City. This is important because you need strong solar radiation, and in particular, ultraviolet radiation, to catalyze particles. Without that, you wouldn't get any ozone formation."

    Arens added that PM2.5 and ozone are caused by many of the same pollutants, so reductions that are now, or will be, in place should help combat both problems.

    "By no means am I sitting here saying that's going to solve the problem, but there is a lot of overlap between the PM2.5 and ozone problems," he said.

    Bo Call, Department of Environmental Quality air monitoring section manager, added that he doesn't know if there is a surefire way to control ozone.

    "You are, and will be, subject to what comes up the canyon from Salt Lake City," he said. "Ozone will travel around, so it's not something you can just put your finger on and say, you made it, now you fix it. So the problem is not going to be initially solved at the local level."

  22. #22
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    She doesn't have a job lined up. She just says that she is a "city girl." I really think its going to be better for our kids to live outside of the pollution.

    However, based on your article, it looks like there is no way to escpace the ozone, even moving to Park City/Heber? Man, maybe we'll need to move to Nephi - LOL.

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    I didn't intend to scare you away from looking into living on the Wasatch Back. The article was for information only. Ozone happens for a variety of reasons. We might exceed the EPA limit on a handful of days a year and only for a couple of hours on those days. That is nothing compared to the inversion in Salt Lake.

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    I moved from Holladay to Park city 3 years ago, my commute increased by almost 15 miles each way, But, my total mileage driven annually has decreased. I used to have to drive to ride my mountain bike ( or do a long road ride from home) now I ride from home or catch the free bus behind my house. I do have a long commute but it is easy with only a couple of bad days a year during snow storms. Suncrest is nice and has good riding nearby at corner canyon, but has some of the worst traffic in the valley.

  25. #25
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    Ok everyone - I'm very close to making my move, and I've got to make it right becuase my wife does not want to move again. I want out of all of the pollution in the Valley for the reasons you guys have mentioned.....pulmonary impairment, cancer risks, especially autism risks. My question is this - what about illness that might be caused by living at higher altitudes. My wife doesn't want to live in Park City or Heber City for some reason because she thinks the commute is too far. We've found a place called Suncrest, in Draper, which is at 6,000 feet and above the inversion. However, when we've gone there, the air is rather cold and thin. Does living at altitudes of higher altitudes cause different kinds of health problems?

    Here is from Wikipedia:

    Mountain medicine recognizes three altitude regions that reflect the lowered amount of oxygen in the atmosphere:[5]

    High altitude = 1,5003,500 metres (4,90011,500 ft)
    Very high altitude = 3,5005,500 metres (11,50018,000 ft)
    Extreme altitude = above 5,500 metres (18,000 ft)

    Travel to each of these altitude regions can lead to medical problems, from the mild symptoms of acute mountain sickness to the potentially fatal high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and high altitude cerebral edema (HACE).

    FYI - Park City is at 7,000 feet, Heber City is at 5,300 feet, and Suncrest, as noted earlier, is at 6,200 feet.

    Do you high altitude folks worry about the health effects of living there? I wouldn't want to replace one worry over pollution with another worry.

    Sometimes, it seems so frustrating that I think of just leaving the State altogether....but the kids really love playing with Grandma every weekend and they have tons of family and cousins here.

    Thanks for any feedback.

  26. #26
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    During extreme changes of altitude (flying from sea level to the mountains for example) you may experience some issues: dehydration, loss of breath when climbing stairs, and for some sensitive people nausea. Almost all of these issues can be mitigated with staying hydrated; the last I read living at a higher altitude requires an increased level of water intake. After 3 weeks you'll start feeling normal and after 3 months your body has increased production of red blood cells and you'll start to function at a totally normal level. I've read studies which say that living at high elevations slightly reduces life expectancy though I'm sure that is offset by living in an outdoor oriented community. Even as a new transplant I never felt bad and I was from near sea level to working at Snowbird, an approximately 7000' elevation change in the span of a week.

    As for the commute, I spend less time driving from downtown to Park City than I did driving to Sandy. Add in the drive to Suncrest and you could probably live in Heber with the same commute time. Of course, there's not much to do for someone who likes city life in Heber so to each their own I suppose.
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    What is the health risk of breathing clean air? Unless you have some pre-existing health condition the change in altitude from the SLC valley will not affect your health in a negative way. It will only make your healthier. If you look around Park City there are a lot of outdoor activities and a lot of active people. I was out riding in Round Valley on Monday and stopped to talk to another rider. He was 64 and killing it. You won't be riding when your 64 if you keep breathing valley air.
    That's my $.02. Best of luck in your search.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cincokid View Post
    What is the health risk of breathing clean air? Unless you have some pre-existing health condition the change in altitude from the SLC valley will not affect your health in a negative way. It will only make your healthier. If you look around Park City there are a lot of outdoor activities and a lot of active people. I was out riding in Round Valley on Monday and stopped to talk to another rider. He was 64 and killing it. You won't be riding when your 64 if you keep breathing valley air.
    That's my $.02. Best of luck in your search.
    I don't think its the clean air but the reduction in oxygen, e.g. thinner air, at higher altitudes that is the issue. Reduced oxygen causes other effects on your body, as the wikipedia article mentioned.

    High altitude: 1,500 to 3,500 metres (4,900 to 11,500 ft) - The onset of physiological effects of diminished inspiratory oxygen pressure (PiO2) includes decreased exercise performance and increased ventilation (lower arterial PCO2). Minor impairment exists in arterial oxygen transport (arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) at least 90%), but arterial PO2 is significantly diminished. Because of the large number of people who ascend rapidly to altitudes between 2,400 and 4,000 m, high-altitude illness is common in this range.[8]

    Just trying to get input from high altitude dwellers as to whether this has caused a problems for them or if they would be concerned at all.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BCTJ View Post
    I don't think its the clean air but the reduction in oxygen, e.g. thinner air, at higher altitudes that is the issue. Reduced oxygen causes other effects on your body, as the wikipedia article mentioned.

    High altitude: 1,500 to 3,500 metres (4,900 to 11,500 ft) - The onset of physiological effects of diminished inspiratory oxygen pressure (PiO2) includes decreased exercise performance and increased ventilation (lower arterial PCO2). Minor impairment exists in arterial oxygen transport (arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) at least 90%), but arterial PO2 is significantly diminished. Because of the large number of people who ascend rapidly to altitudes between 2,400 and 4,000 m, high-altitude illness is common in this range.[8]

    Just trying to get input from high altitude dwellers as to whether this has caused a problems for them or if they would be concerned at all.
    You should read medical journals instead of Wikipedia, the only relevant item in that paragraph that you cited is the caveat "people who ascend rapidly to altitudes between 2,400 and 4,000 m". That is also known as acute altitude (or mountain) sickness if you're wanting to look up more information. Some people who fly in from sea level for ski vacations experience nausea and lack of appetite due to altitude change, I experienced it when I was younger when taking my first vacation to the mountains in CO.

    Hydrate well when you arrive, limit physical exertion until you know how your body responds (do strenuous things in bursts, rest as needed which will probably be more than at sea level), and avoid (large amounts) of alcohol. After a few weeks you'll be up to speed and ready to party.

    If living at altitude were so hazardous then Denver and Colorado Springs would be ghost towns; there are many communities around the world at high elevations and I have yet to see much data supporting any actual hazards. It is typically the rapid change in elevation which causes issues, not so much long term exposure. Here is a summary of a study suggesting high elevation living increases life expectancy (though I still have issue with the correlation v. causation of this).

    Article: Does Living at High Altitude Help You Live Longer? | Science | OutsideOnline.com
    Study: High Altitude Boosts Longevity And Reduces Risk Of Dying Of Ischemic Heart Disease - Medical News Today

    TLDR Version: no real overall difference, longer life expectancy is probably due to lifestyle instead of altitude. Though some health issues are improved at high altitude while things like UV exposure are increased leading to the general similarity of life span from low land to high land.
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    There are an awful lot of people living at 6,500 feet in the world and if there were negative effects on health, I think we'd know by now. Put it out of your head. Yes, it will be colder in the winter. It also won't be 95 degrees or hotter for 35 straight days or whatever it was last summer in the valley.

    Also make sure your commute is actually shorter (in terms of time) living in Suncrest. PC -> SLC is a surprisingly easy/quick commute IMO. It takes me about the same time to get to Costco from Jeremy as it did from our place by the U, because I don't spend 10 minutes sitting at a stoplight every block.

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    Suncrest has got to be the windiest place in Utah, if that's your thing.
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    Well, I would prefer Park City personally but my lady feels its too small and too far from downtown, even though I think you're correct that its actually a shorter commute. We also drove down to Eagle Mountain and she felt that was too far away too. So, that just leaves Suncrest to be above the pollution.

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    I remember when Suncrest was built, there was a mad rush to purchase and move there.

    18 mos later 1/2 the people had moved out because the winter is 6 weeks longer up there, it's always windy, and the commute is horrible. Just know what you are in for!

    If she's a "City Girl" I can't imagine why you would want to stay anywhere in Utah, City Life is pretty rare here. Downtown or Sugarhouse are as close as you can get to it in this state. I love living here because we DON'T have that here.

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    Yeah, the city girl thing is going to be a problem no matter what. Downtown SLC is great and all, but man, if you're used to a real city... it's hicksville.

    Good luck. Live in the valley for a year and she'll change her tune?

    -Walt

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    Yeah, I'm a native Utahn and wanted to move back to be closer to family. I thought it would be fun for my kids to have grandparents, uncles, aunts, etc. However, my wife and I met in Washington DC and she would like to move back there. I keep telling her that Utah will grow on her (I hope I'm right).

    I really wasn't very concerned with the pollution growing up here. But, I do remember getting sick every winter - whether it be a cough, bronchitis and, one year, pneumonia. I always thought that my lungs were just too weak to handle the cold. But, now, I'm thinking my yearly winter sickness was in actuality a result of the inversion pollution. Also, coming back after ten years away, it seems like the pollution here has gotten worse, but zebrahum informed me that statistically the air pollution has actually gotten better, but it just seems like its gotten worse.

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    Or.....it could be from seasonal illness.

    Just an FYI, I've lived at 7600 feet for almost 20 years....and not problems have I at all.

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    Why not rent a place in the Park City area and see if you like it before making the final decision. The town is quite diverse with people from all over the country and world now calling it home. You might find out everything you are looking for is closer than you think. I grew up in the valley and have family and friends there and see them quite often. My friends come to Park City all the time. I have lived on this side of the Wasatch for over 20 years without any health issues. Because of the access to so much outdoor recreation I am in better health than when I was living in the city. There are also plenty of restaurants, shops, concerts etc. to keep one from getting bored when they're not out on the trail.

  38. #38
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    Not all of Summit County is at 7000' . We live at 6450' in the Highland Estates area. I am 2 miles from I-80 and commute 4x per week to SLC. I would invite you and your wife to come up and see what it is like here. there are trails right out the back door. The kids ride their bikes to school, There is a young riders program to teach kids how to mountain bike. I don't think there is a better place to grow up in the entire country ( even if you are an old kid in his 60's) The only health issue I know of from living at elevation is dry skin from the dry air, and that is very little different from SLC. P.s. Suncrest has one of the worst commutes in the valley, would take longer than Park City to get downtown.

  39. #39
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    You guys certainly make Park City sound more appealing than Suncrest. Maybe I'll give it another shot with my wife. If i could somehow convince her that Park City isn't the rural outback that she thinks it is. Heck, I'm sure they have better shopping up there than Salt Lake.

  40. #40
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    Summit county is the place to live if you work in SLC and want to get out of the pollution.

    The problem is not everyone can afford it. It's going to be a half million dollar minimum to get a single family house in the Park City/Kimball area.

    Don't get the wrong impression, I'd love to move back to Park City, but now that I've got a wife and kid, slumming it in a 2 bedroom apartment for $1,500 a month isn't tenable from a lifestyle perspective, and a $500,000 mortgage is also out of the question.

    So it'll be down to the valley with us eventually.

    And I'll also add this: I've lived in Los Angeles and I've also lived in the Salt Lake valley, and the Salt Lake valley has NOTHING on Los Angeles pollution. There are possibly two bad months out of the year in the Salt Lake valley, and I think the severity of the air pollution in the Salt Lake valley may be taken a bit out of context because we have a group of people that are hyper aware of it.

    That's not to down play the air pollution problem in the valley. It exists in an objective and measurable form, and we all know that we need to make positive changes to the environment to curb the pollution problem. But at the same time, I've never seen the type of debate you see among people moving to Pittsburgh or Los Angeles, two cities that are also in valleys and also have pollution problems. Or how about Grand Junction? How many of us would give one of our toes to retire to Fruita and ride every day? They suffer from the same problems that the Salt Lake valley has.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by BCTJ View Post
    You guys certainly make Park City sound more appealing than Suncrest. Maybe I'll give it another shot with my wife. If i could somehow convince her that Park City isn't the rural outback that she thinks it is. Heck, I'm sure they have better shopping up there than Salt Lake.
    For me it comes down to Park City is a community while Suncrest has always been a subdivision to me. PC has shops and events and character while Suncrest is just a bunch of homes in a pretty nice place; no shops no community outside of a ward (which is fine but can be non-inclusive to outsiders) and very little character. If your wife can get past the small population it can be an interesting place to live. Short of living downtown or in Sugarhouse there aren't any places in UT which actually feel like city living, Suncrest is certainly no exception and in my opinion it is less city living with harder access to the city than Park City. Of course, I'm biased.
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  42. #42
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    If your wife wants the activities of a city, Park city is so much better than Suncrest. Park city is a resort town, it has so many restaurants, bars etc. During the summer there are concerts almost every evening. Have her check out mountaintown music or it might be mountaintown stages. Also check out the Egyptian theater. Many of these events are free. they show free outdoor sundance movies also. So much to do , its a really fun place to live. and then there are the trails..........

  43. #43
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    Idk, I am from where I am living now and in about a week I am moving back to SLC. I got a job in Orem, but I did not want to live down there. So I am gonna just have to deal with the commute. As everyone else has said the inversion is what it is and did not bother me all that much when I was living out there before. It is like everything else in life, you get used to it. I just could not get used to York, PA anymore even though I was born and raised here. It is a depressing place to live compared to SLC. Last time I was there I was living in WVC. Now I am going to be living on the east side in Cottonwood Heights. I checked the map of the area and I am content that I am real close now to the mouth of Big and Little Cottonwood Canyons. PC is nice, but a bit pricy to live up there imo.
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    if you gave me free lodging and paid me i still wouldn't leave my $850 studio apt. in PC for 4,000 sq ft in the valley. and if anyone thinks there isn't enough "city life" up here just come for the last 10 days of january, you'll get enough "city life" to last your whole year

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