Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. #1
    John Finch
    Guest

    Smile Kokopelli Dream (Moab A-Line)

    It sure would be nice if the local Moab group could get together and solve a big problem of riding on the Kokopelli trail during wet conditions. My dream would be that there would an effort to convert the upper Kokopelli to a sustainable A-Line type trail.

    The upper section is a nightmare during wet periods. The jeep road was poorly designed and due to that fact it is a major downhill rut fest. It sure would be nice if the mud section could be rocked (about two feet wide) and a two foot high or higher table top could be built every fifty yards to divert the water off the jeep road and significantly reduce those fun deep rutted sections.

    I believe that if some type of Kokopelli A-Line could be built, the people who have left Moab for something new would come back for a BIG SMILE ride. Who knows maybe Cedric might come for a ride.

  2. #2
    More Chasmism
    Reputation: hfly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    798
    It sure would be nice if blue lines weren't painted across the lesser known sections of Gold Bar Rim, and if new trails weren't cut slopeside into archeologically sensitive riparian areas (ala Kane Creek).

    I have no LPS qualms. Open travel.

    Regarding Gold Bar, a limerick:

    There once was a trail built by Bounder
    That proved he could banefully flounder.
    Crust warrants constraint
    And sandstone hates paint.
    Now she's trashed because everyone found her.


    Some SUWA friends encountered those poached blue lines and pitched a (reasonable) fit a month after they were painted. Funny how that area had seen the passage of bikes for four years without anyone ever noticing tracks. IMHO, true bikers have more in common with hikers (detesting the destruction of the desert) than with the moto or ATV crowd. These recent poaching endeavors lump us with the motorized crowd in the minds of environmental advocates.

    hfly

    P.S. I agree that some stabilization of Koko wold be good, given the massive increase in its use, its Morrison composition and esp. this season's completion of the newly legal Hazard.
    Last edited by hfly; 02-02-2006 at 11:54 AM.

  3. #3
    John Finch
    Guest

    Smile

    hifly,

    Thanks for your post I can't say I understand all you have said and I am sum what confused:

    Are you telling me that there is a trail that climbs up to Gold Bar Rim off that terrible jeep road? Wow how cool. And you say the locals have been riding it for four years w/o telling the non-locals where it was at. That is really something. Is the alignment any good? Could you describe it to me. That area out there is pretty big there must be more than one alignment.

    What is the deal with the blue lines? Has anyone died out there by getting lost? I understand that several people have died on Porcupine Rim even after it had been established for many years.

    I am curious about the people who were really pissed about the blue lines. Do they still ride the alignment? Or are they not getting to ride the alignment like the rest of us that don't have a clue where it is at. They wouldn't still be riding it because it is an adventure epic that the rest of us would love to ride.

    I can only imagine how well it might ride compared to that screwed up Gold Bar Rim jeep road. The views and terrain must be sepectacular. How does it climb compared to the Gold Bar Rim jeep road? Where was the beginning of the trail?

    As far as the Kane Creek trail that you are talking about, I am equally clueless. Are you telling me that there is a trail in Kane Creek? What is the purpose of the trail? I myself know about two crossing points of Kane Creek. One where you cross to climb Amasa Back and two where you cross after riding Cliff Hanger.

    From what I have experiened with the second crossing is six feet of water during spring run-off. I have had to take my bike apart and swim it about 25 feet across that section. It is kind of fun if it's 90 plus degrees out. If it is 50 degrees it isn't so much fun.

    Are you telling us that there is some kind of new trail down in the creek section? What is the purpose of the new trail? Does it eliminate the swim? You say it goes though a very sensitive area. Were there ever any trails out there previously? Did the indians have any trails out there? Were do you find out about these sensitive areas? Can I google it? Is the new trail sustainable, or is it a piece of pu? Do you or your local friends ever use it? Where does it start? Is it legal to hike? Is it illegal to hike in Moab?

    As far as the viewpoint on Amasa Back. I really enjoy it up there and I understand all the locals love to bomb back down the trail that they just rode up. I myself would love to continue my ride into an adventure epic. I would love to find a BIG HOLE in the rock to take some pictures. I think some North Shore bike companies may have thought the same. Are you saying the locals no a route that they are keeping from the non-locals who might also enjoy the ride? Does it have any singletrack or is it the same screwed up jeep road climb that everyone goes on if they come into town late in the day.

    Where do you go after you run into the HOLE? Is ther some secret way back? It would really be cool if you could get over to Cliff Hanger and not have to ride the screwed up jeep road that all the locals love to ride.

    I myself love to ride Cliff Hanger. The techy aspect is better for an old guy like me. And I love to look down on the Colorado and pretend I am an old indian on one of my favorite trails looking for a horny squaw to enjoy the view with.

    I am really looking forward to your reply.

  4. #4
    More Chasmism
    Reputation: hfly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    798
    Quote Originally Posted by John Finch
    I am really looking forward to your reply.
    The tone of your questions suggests that indeed I have your identity right and that you know a thing or two about me.

    As to the HOLE, or Pothole Arch to which you refer, I did see that Norco picture. There's a pre-existing route that makes the connection you seek. Not such a secret.

    I have sources (hikers, jeepers, etc.) that know an incredible amount about Moab. Very humbling. I will not betray the places that they love. They should not be able to detect the slightest signs of anyone's passage should they choose to visit a place after I do. That is my standard. If it seems exclusive, it is out of deference to the desert and to them, not out of haughtiness.

    I'll send you a private message here in the next day or so. I had been wanting to talk to you (presuming I have the identity right, which I almost certainly must) for some time, and the opportunity just presented itself.

    Cheers,

    hfly

  5. #5
    Shocks...pegs...lucky!
    Reputation: lavaman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    56
    So I am getting increasingly more confused about the Hazard trail. I heard from someone at Poison Spider BS that Hazard was illegal. In this post it appears to be open and legal. Whats the deal? I don't care as much about riding the trail, though it seems awesome, as I am interested in an uninterupted descent from Burro Pass. As it stands, a shuttle vehicle would have to drive riders 5mi. up the LaSal mtn loop road to pick up the trail again at Koko. I don't care if I have to ride double track, I just don't want to pedal my hog up the hill if I don't have to.

    BTW - I have only ridden from the top of Koko at the T with the pavement down Porc. I never rode the UPS, nor did I know about it at the time. I have however, explored the mountain from Burro Pass on down with Google Earth. I believe I have found Hazard and am pretty sure I know where the turnoff to UPS is but won't ride it. Like you, I know a secret trail is secret for a reason esp. if it's illegal. Funny thing is, illegal trails sometimes become legal...i.e. some of the stuff built by 'Dean' in Springdale, UT

    lavaman
    Your mountain bike hates its life as a road bike.

  6. #6
    More Chasmism
    Reputation: hfly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    798
    Hazard County is being rebuilt with a slight reroute in fully legal form. A lot of it is altready done, but it should be finished by this summer. This is an actual Forest Service project.

    No one really knows what's going to happen to UPS. Offcially it's illegal, though that has been poorly enforced as of last season. UPS has some serious archeologic issues that could easily doom it to extinction.

    LPS traverses an open travel area and therefore is apparently not illegal.

    Hope that helps.

    hfly

  7. #7
    Shocks...pegs...lucky!
    Reputation: lavaman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    56
    That does help. Thanks

    Lavaman
    Your mountain bike hates its life as a road bike.

  8. #8
    John Finch
    Guest
    lavaman:

    I just did a ride with Dean and he says Flying Monkey is illegal so I am surprised you ride it. Probably over 1,500 people have been down UPS, so you might best ride it before the Forest Service closes it for good.

    I understand Coyote Shuttle has a permit to shuttle riders up to LPS, so I agree with hfly about it staying open.

    I would love to help the Forest Service complete the Hazard County project and I was wondering if they use any volunteer help. It is pretty easy to build there and you could complete the trail pretty quick with some motivated workers.

  9. #9
    Shocks...pegs...lucky!
    Reputation: lavaman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2005
    Posts
    56
    This is apparently another one of those misunderstandings. I was in St. George this Tuesday and Wednesday. I stopped in at Desert Cyclery, owned by my buddy Kong Davis. He is selling a map with the IMBA logo on it with Flying Monkey listed as a completely legitimate trail. He also has friends in the BLM in St. George, as does Dean. I don't know who's information is up to or out of date but since I don't ride Monkey that often and I don't announce it online before I go, I think I am pretty safe. I am pretty sure this is another one of those trails that started out illegal and went legit. This map, titled St. George and Springdale, Utah Trailmap, comes on the heals of a newly approved trail construction process. Hopefully spawning a new era of co-operation in the St. George area.

    Lavaman
    Your mountain bike hates its life as a road bike.

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.