If I can only do 3...which ones?- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 59 of 59
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bradmtb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    243

    If I can only do 3...which ones?

    My wife and I are coming to Moab next week (15th anniversary) for the first time.
    We have 3 full days, and want to do the "must ride" trails that range 2-4 hours.
    Considering I've seen pictures of snow posted this week on some trails, that I'm with my wife (she's both technically and fitness an intermediate rider), it's our first trip,
    what are 3 XC-type rides we must do?
    Every day above ground is a great day!

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    336
    I could be wrong here, but when I think of XC, Moab does not come to mind.

    That being said, AmasaBack to Jackson is one of my favs, and anything out in the Soverign system. will probably be good for a XC rider.

    The usual suspects will probably have better advice than me, but those 2 should be enjoyable, or not.

  3. #3
    banned
    Reputation: traildoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    5,540
    Quote Originally Posted by jay80424
    I could be wrong here, but when I think of XC, Moab does not come to mind.

    That being said, AmasaBack to Jackson is one of my favs, and anything out in the Soverign system. will probably be good for a XC rider.

    The usual suspects will probably have better advice than me, but those 2 should be enjoyable, or not.
    When did Jackson become XC? The Bar M might be more appropriate for your first ride, if you want to stay married. If you are looking for a divorce the Jackson ride would work perfect.

    TD

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    24
    What about Porcupine Rim? We did that this past sunday. SWEET ride! I was with my fiance and my good friend. My fiance is in her 2nd season biking(should be 3rd but broke her hand/thumb on June 6th snowmobiling only got 2 days mtn biking in), we all had a great time. She's dropping stuff and riding things I wasn't doing my 3rd season. It's got great views, some ups, great downs and some exposure (I didn't like, afraid of heights).

    We started at camp cluster C on Sand Flats and road back into town to meet for our driver to get us back to camp.

    Took 3.5hrs total. We stopped for pics, food, shade.

  5. #5
    Mojo0115
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,667
    I would recommend Sovereign, Klondike (with or without Baby Steps), Porcupine. This is a nice sampler of Moab to get a taste of the different types of trails out there.

    Porcupine will be the toughest for her but as long as she is happy to walk a couple of sections in the bottom area and go slow in some rough sections she will almost certainly have a fun time and see some amazing terrain. If she is an intermediate rider then she is better than many of the people who do that trail already.

  6. #6
    Desert Seeker
    Reputation: glesoine's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    235
    I'd also say Klondike Bluffs (either Klondike all the way or take Baby Steps up to connect into Klondike near the top). Baby Steps has some nice single track. Walk out to the Bluffs. The MOAB Brand trails, avoiding Bar B and Killer B, are intermediate trails. If your wife can handle these first two trails without difficulty then I would say go for either Porcupine Rim or Sovereign. They are a definite step up in technical difficulty. If she'd rather do a more mellow ride, consider a ride up to Hurrah Pass or out to Gemini Bridges. These are pretty much scenic dirt road rides.

  7. #7
    Bored Carp
    Reputation: chuky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2005
    Posts
    1,596
    Heh. Was there last week. Watched 10 annoyed dudes drag their bikes like bunny blankets down the Jackson descent while their local "friend" rode on ahead.
    I only attempt to change the world in the appropriate World-Changing venues and forums.

  8. #8
    Ride and Smile
    Reputation: axolotl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    736
    Quote Originally Posted by traildoc
    When did Jackson become XC? The Bar M might be more appropriate for your first ride, if you want to stay married. If you are looking for a divorce the Jackson ride would work perfect.
    TD
    When didn't it? I guess it depends on one's idea of xc. I think of everything in Moab as xc (cept Bartlets and maybe chili n Dave's). It's just technical riding.
    But intermediate skills and fitness could be fine for Jackson. My girlfriend and young son enjoy it.
    But as for a recommendation, UPS should be open so UPS, LPS, Porcupine would be my 1st choice (but not 1st ride)
    Rockstacker is so well marked now that Amasa-rockstacker-Jackson is a nice loop.

    It really depends on your desire. Is challenging terrain fun you folks? I think it's nice cause you get to try things and when you don't, it gives you a chance to get off your bike and walk and see more.

    Also keep in mind that in Moab a six inch travel rig is an XC bike, so I recommend renting if you have 4" bikes or less. (5" works ok)

  9. #9
    banned
    Reputation: traildoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    5,540
    [QUOTE=axolotl]When didn't it? I guess it depends on one's idea of xc. I think of everything in Moab as xc (cept Bartlets and maybe chili n Dave's). It's just technical riding.
    But intermediate skills and fitness could be fine for Jackson. My girlfriend and young son enjoy it. QUOTE]

    I would love to see the OP's wife ride/walk down Jackson's and do a post on what she thought of the trail. I personally love the ride and have cleaned it once or twice. I have also spent over ten manhours of trail maintenance on it trying to dumb it down to my level of riding.

    My wife has ridden Jackson's several times after riding Rockstacker and now she usually opts to ride down Amassa Back since she doesn't like drop-off left.

    I think there is a MTBR post that did a video of the Jackson trail, it might give the OP a feel for whether his wife might like it.

    I am curious if OP's wife is totally into doing harder rides and doesn't mind getting off her bike and walking sections that she doesn't have the skills to ride? If she loves riding Butcher Ranch, Big Boulder and Second Divide, then I would say she is going to love UPS, LPS and Porcuine Rim. If she has good judgement skills and doesn't get frustrated walking sections over her head then she is going to have a great time.

    I once took some hardcore Durango XC riders on the Blue Dot to the Portal and after the ride they said it was the worst ride they have ever done. I thought it was one of my best rides ever, and had no clue what they were talking about.

    TD

  10. #10
    Ride and Smile
    Reputation: axolotl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    736

    Make trails harder and ride harder

    [QUOTE=traildoc]
    Quote Originally Posted by axolotl
    When didn't it? I guess it depends on one's idea of xc. I think of everything in Moab as xc (cept Bartlets and maybe chili n Dave's). It's just technical riding.
    But intermediate skills and fitness could be fine for Jackson. My girlfriend and young son enjoy it. QUOTE]

    I would love to see the OP's wife ride/walk down Jackson's and do a post on what she thought of the trail. I personally love the ride and have cleaned it once or twice. I have also spent over ten manhours of trail maintenance on it trying to dumb it down to my level of riding.

    TD
    There are already a multitude of dumbed-down trails. Please don't reduce the number of smart trails. Climbers deal with this issue. Just cause its there, doesn't mean we should be able to do it.
    One of the most rewarding aspects of riding (or climbing, skiing, etc) is getting a line that that had beaten you on every prior attempt.
    Jackson isn't that hard and it definitely doesn't need to be any easier. If anything it could use more features.
    P.S. Thanks for the trail work, that's awesome!

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: KRob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    12,057
    Don't forget Slick Rock Trail.

    +1 for Sovereign

    I thought Klondike Bluffs was quite boring. Gemini Bridges dirt road would fit in that category too.... Klondike may be OK for a late afternoon second ride of the day. It's a pretty view at sunset when you hike the last .5mile out to the bluffs.... just not a great "trail" imo.

    But yeah, definitely consider her skills and tolerance for exposure before taking her on Rockstacker or Jackson's. Fun, fun stuff, but not for every intermediate. Same goes for Porcupine Rim but I'd definitely put it on the list if she's game. Start at LPS (I think UPS is still snowed under).
    Last edited by KRob; 04-21-2010 at 02:16 PM.

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bradmtb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    243
    T.D., my wife rides Butcher Ranch and Second Divide and enjoys them both. I guess the ideal ride for both of us would be scenic singletrack not too steep up or down. Are we going to be shuttling most rides, drive our rental car, or leave from our motel in town?
    Every day above ground is a great day!

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Posts
    682
    Here's Rockstacker -> Jackson's video from last season's trip...

    <object width="684" height="513"><param name="allowfullscreen" value="true" /><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always" /><param name="movie" value="http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=7243022&amp;server=vimeo.com &amp;show_title=0&amp;show_byline=0&amp;show_portr ait=0&amp;color=870007&amp;fullscreen=1" /><embed src="http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=7243022&amp;server=vimeo.com &amp;show_title=0&amp;show_byline=0&amp;show_portr ait=0&amp;color=870007&amp;fullscreen=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="always" width="684" height="513"></embed></object>

    Not too sure if intermediate is the word I'd use to describe it.... IMO. But a great trail!
    phil shep

    COMM|T OR EAT SH|T

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: chuckie33's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Posts
    761
    How do you connect to Jackson's and or Rockstacker from Amasa Back? Last time I was there I did Amasa out and back. Would like to try these two when I'm there in two weeks. Also, where do they come out at (as in, my car will be at the lot just below Amasa, how do I get back to it)?
    If you ever see a turtle on a telephone pole, remember he had help getting there. Is there anything beer can't do?

  15. #15
    banned
    Reputation: traildoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    5,540
    Quote Originally Posted by chuckie33
    How do you connect to Jackson's and or Rockstacker from Amasa Back? Last time I was there I did Amasa out and back. Would like to try these two when I'm there in two weeks. Also, where do they come out at (as in, my car will be at the lot just below Amasa, how do I get back to it)?
    You will exit at the parking lot below the lot you normally park at.

    TD

  16. #16
    banned
    Reputation: traildoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    5,540
    Quote Originally Posted by bradmtb
    T.D., my wife rides Butcher Ranch and Second Divide and enjoys them both. I guess the ideal ride for both of us would be scenic singletrack not too steep up or down. Are we going to be shuttling most rides, drive our rental car, or leave from our motel in town?
    BM:

    If she likes those two trails she will blow her mind on the UPS and LPS they are by far two of the most scenic trails in the good old USA. You will need to ride up the Kokopelli backwards to access the UPS but it will be worth it. It takes about 30 minutes to get up to the beginning of the UPS. I would imagine the shuttles are dropping off at the bottom of the Kokopelli.

    Have Fun,

    TD

  17. #17
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bradmtb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    243
    Philshep, I just had my wife watch the video, and you scared the C$#P out of her...actually she liked everything until she saw the steep drop offs down to the river on Jackson.
    If your camera's like mine, it tends to distort the actual width of the trail. I think UPS/LPS/Kokopelli are in the running.
    Every day above ground is a great day!

  18. #18
    banned
    Reputation: traildoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    5,540
    Quote Originally Posted by bradmtb
    Philshep, I just had my wife watch the video, and you scared the C$#P out of her...actually she liked everything until she saw the steep drop offs down to the river on Jackson.
    If your camera's like mine, it tends to distort the actual width of the trail. I think UPS/LPS/Kokopelli are in the running.
    BM:

    Actually the Jacksn trail is pretty narrow and the tech is like where the guy died on the Second Divide trail.

    There are several moves on the Porcupine Rim singletrack section (last three miles of the ride) that will remind you of Second Divide except the drop-off is on the right and not left.

    TD

  19. #19
    Mojo0115
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    1,667
    Quote Originally Posted by traildoc
    BM:

    Actually the Jacksn trail is pretty narrow and the tech is like where the guy died on the Second Divide trail.

    There are several moves on the Porcupine Rim singletrack section (last three miles of the ride) that will remind you of Second Divide except the drop-off is on the right and not left.

    TD
    ? You would have to try really hard to kill yourself on Porcupine.

    Portal freaked me the first time I did it. Porcupine bought a smile to my face. There is a sense of height because the river is of a ways, but the trail itself doesn't seem like that to me.

  20. #20
    banned
    Reputation: traildoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    5,540
    Quote Originally Posted by zzsean
    ? You would have to try really hard to kill yourself on Porcupine.

    Portal freaked me the first time I did it. Porcupine bought a smile to my face. There is a sense of height because the river is of a ways, but the trail itself doesn't seem like that to me.
    If the OP's wife cleans Second Divide she will have a blast riding the last three miles of the Porcupine Singletrack. Whenever I ride that section on a crowded day there seems to be a lot of riders walking their bikes. Not sure why they were walking when the trail is so fun to ride.

    TD

  21. #21
    JMH
    JMH is offline
    Sugary Exoskeleton
    Reputation: JMH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    4,659
    I think there is some minor sandbagging going on in this thread.

    TD has got the vibe right, IME 75% of the people going down Porcupine ST are walking their bikes. It may not seem like exposure to those of us that are used to it, but most people are clearly over their heads. And there are several moves in there that require some solid riding to clean, although they don't seem to coincide with the exposed areas. That doesn't mean that it's not fun for them, I would still go along with recommending Porc to an intermediate rider.

    Rockstacker to Jackson's is significantly tougher than Porc. Calling those trails intermediate might do a good job of describing the sections between the multiple steep Expert sections and doesn't take into account the exposure either.

    Don't get me wrong, these are great trails, my favorites in Moab. But it's good that people are posting vids (that make Rockstacker and Jackson's look TAME compared to real life BTW, nice save on the last right turn of the rocky stairstep switchbacks on RS!) so the OP can wade through the subjective ratings.

    Slickrock, Sovereign, Porcupine would be my three suggestions if you wanted to get a sample of the main types of riding in Moab. Whichever one you like best, you can up the ante on your next visit. I guarantee you will find them all 100% fun, challenging and worthy, they are classics after all.

    JMH
    Last edited by JMH; 04-22-2010 at 07:55 AM.

  22. #22
    Dr. Pepper drinker
    Reputation: catch22's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,626
    Quote Originally Posted by bradmtb
    T.D., my wife rides Butcher Ranch and Second Divide and enjoys them both. I guess the ideal ride for both of us would be scenic singletrack not too steep up or down. Are we going to be shuttling most rides, drive our rental car, or leave from our motel in town?
    Shuttle for Porcupine with a ride back to town afterwards, drive to the trailhead for the others. In theory you can ride to some trails but the time/energy spent would be better used for another ride or hiking Arches if you haven't been there before.

    I agree with JMH on all points he made, to me Jacksons is far more difficult than Porcupine and I'd say it ranks above Portal as well. Might not be as chunky overall as Portal but there are more nasty tech moves with not so great traction. That said Amasa to Rockstacker back to Amasa isn't a bad option at all for those that don't want to hit Jackson or the water at the bottom is too high.
    Last edited by catch22; 04-22-2010 at 08:13 AM.
    Sipping the Knolly Whisquillappa

  23. #23
    Dr. Pepper drinker
    Reputation: catch22's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    1,626
    Quote Originally Posted by chuckie33
    How do you connect to Jackson's and or Rockstacker from Amasa Back? Last time I was there I did Amasa out and back. Would like to try these two when I'm there in two weeks. Also, where do they come out at (as in, my car will be at the lot just below Amasa, how do I get back to it)?
    There's new signage on Amasa showing the route and Rockstacker is painted so it will be tough to miss now. The only thing you will want to do before you start is check the water level below the lower parking lot that you'll have to cross at the end of Jacksons. If it's flooded you're stuck with a miserable hike out or going all the way back up Jacksons.
    Sipping the Knolly Whisquillappa

  24. #24
    banned
    Reputation: traildoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    5,540
    Quote Originally Posted by catch22
    The only thing you will want to do before you start is check the water level below the lower parking lot that you'll have to cross at the end of Jacksons. If it's flooded you're stuck with a miserable hike out or going all the way back up Jacksons.
    22 has a good point about checking out the crossing. There are actually two crossings: the first is directly across from the Jackson trail when you reach the water crossing. This crossing is normally high during the spring due to the high level of the Colorado which backs up into the creek.

    About 5 years ago the locals built a bypass trail that is routed on the west side of the creek and crosses the creek at a higher elevation therefore lower crossing depth, if any.

    That being said the creek is sometimes so deep that the beginnig of the bypass trail is also underwater.

    In the past (before the bypass trail) on a warm day we would take our bikes apart (wheels and frame) and swim across the creek if we couldn't touch the bottom. It kind of made the ride more of an adventure ride.

    I have always thought the local rock climbers could help out the mountain biking community and drive in some type of rock anchors into the begining section of the bypass trail that a rope could be attached to allow easier passage during high water periods.

    TD

  25. #25
    mtbr member
    Reputation: KRob's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    12,057
    Quote Originally Posted by JMH
    But it's good that people are posting vids (that make Rockstacker and Jackson's look TAME compared to real life BTW,
    JMH
    Good points J.

    The video flattens out some of the steepness for sure, but I think the wide angle lens greatly exaggerates the exposure. The trail isn't that narrow and there's some roll before you'd ever get to a true drop on most of the Jackson's trail (ie, the shoulder is wider than it looks). Either that or I have really good blinders.
    Last edited by KRob; 04-22-2010 at 12:13 PM.

  26. #26
    JMH
    JMH is offline
    Sugary Exoskeleton
    Reputation: JMH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    4,659
    Quote Originally Posted by KRob
    Good points J.

    The video flattens out some of the steepness for sure, but I think the wide angle lens greatly exaggerates the exposure. The trail isn't that narrow and there's some roll before you'd ever get to a true drop on most of the Jackson's trail (ie, the shoulder is wider than it looks). Either that or I have really good blinders.
    Yeah, you're probably right. There is really only that one downhill ledge to the edge and about 50 yards of skinny stuff. But it's sketchier than anything on Porc.

    But yeah, I am only looking at the trail.

  27. #27
    banned
    Reputation: traildoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    5,540
    Quote Originally Posted by JMH
    Yeah, you're probably right. There is really only that one downhill ledge to the edge and about 50 yards of skinny stuff. But it's sketchier than anything on Porc.

    But yeah, I am only looking at the trail.
    I really think it would be cool if the OP's wife were to roll into that trail and give her report on what she thought of the ride. Whenever I roll up to the start of the exposed section I do a heavy in and out breathing routine to get my mind off the exposure. I find if I can get through the first downhill exposed section and make the right hand turn up section, I am oxygenated enough to possibly make the climb w/o stopping. .

    When I get to the REAL tech section, I have either done well on the previous setions or I have totally blown it and I go into that section with a lot of doubt and gloom staring me in the face.

    That next real techy left hander is were the whole ride can turn into a great ride or an OK ride. That turn has always been my worst nightmare and I wish I was able to go into it with more confidence. I am not sure where my bike position should be, right or left, so my confidence is deminished. Anyone have any insights as to how to make that turn?.

    TD.

  28. #28
    JMH
    JMH is offline
    Sugary Exoskeleton
    Reputation: JMH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    4,659
    Quote Originally Posted by traildoc
    Anyone have any insights as to how to make that turn?
    I have to go REAL slow, get WAY back and just commit to turning the bars as my wheel is dropping. It's not a gimme for me either, I am about 50% dab-free there. The next ledge 50 feet down the trail is freaky to me too, I hit my butt on the tire and I STILL feel like I am going to go over, although I clean it every time since you don't have to turn.

    Talking about the left/right switchbacks, right?

    JMH

  29. #29
    More Chasmism
    Reputation: hfly's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    798
    Quote Originally Posted by JMH
    I have to go REAL slow, get WAY back and just commit to turning the bars as my wheel is dropping. It's not a gimme for me either, I am about 50% dab-free there. The next ledge 50 feet down the trail is freaky to me too, I hit my butt on the tire and I STILL feel like I am going to go over, although I clean it every time since you don't have to turn.

    Talking about the left/right switchbacks, right?

    JMH
    Yes, that first left turn above the "Big Boy" (as some locals call it) is the toughest -- tougher IMHO than anything on Rockstacker or Amasa (except for, say, climbing the Humbucker along the Clffhnager section) . If you make that turn the rest of switchback is just about staying back. There is another little narrow spoiler move about 100 feet past the second (right) swtchback which has a way of sabotaging clean runs.

    I think that Amasa --> Pothole --> Rockstacker --> Amasa is a fine ride even omitting Jackson's. Not sure if I'd consider it standard, "intermediate: XC fare though.

    My suggestion would be:

    (1) Deadhorse, then Bartlett
    (2) Sovereign, maybe a bit of Slickrock
    (3) Porc from as high up as shuttle-ably possible

    Enjoy!

    hfly

  30. #30
    banned
    Reputation: traildoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    5,540
    Quote Originally Posted by JMH
    I have to go REAL slow, get WAY back and just commit to turning the bars as my wheel is dropping. It's not a gimme for me either, I am about 50% dab-free there. The next ledge 50 feet down the trail is freaky to me too, I hit my butt on the tire and I STILL feel like I am going to go over, although I clean it every time since you don't have to turn.

    Talking about the left/right switchbacks, right?

    JMH
    J:

    Thanks for the tip. The best I do is 20% and that drop 50 feet down the trail after the left hand turn is an attention getter. The second right hand turn (which is uphill), after the 50' down the hill drop, is also a trouble spot if you don't know it's uphill after the turn.

    J, I appreciate your posts they are well thought out.

    TD

  31. #31
    frejwilk
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by hfly
    My suggestion would be:

    (1) Deadhorse, then Bartlett
    (2) Sovereign, maybe a bit of Slickrock
    (3) Porc from as high up as shuttle-ably possible

    Enjoy!

    hfly
    Ding, ding, ding. hfly's recommendations are spot on for what has been requested. I'd only add a couple of things to think about when you get to Moab.

    Take advantage of the advice you can get from local Moab bike shops. Especially if you go in and ask after having ridden something in the area.

    Amasa Back is a tough area to get recommendations for. Personally, based on what the OP has described - I'd recommend riding up Amasa Back trail and checking out the view from the overlook, then backtracking a little bit and doing an out and back to Pothole Arch, then descending back down the Amasa Back trail.

    But again, those three days hfly suggested are going to be pretty tough to beat for the kind of riding described.

    I hope you enjoy your trip,

    FW

  32. #32
    Ride and Smile
    Reputation: axolotl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    736

    Walking is OK

    Quote Originally Posted by JMH
    I think there is some minor sandbagging going on in this thread.

    TD has got the vibe right, IME 75% of the people going down Porcupine ST are walking their bikes. It may not seem like exposure to those of us that are used to it, but most people are clearly over their heads. And there are several moves in there that require some solid riding to clean, although they don't seem to coincide with the exposed areas. That doesn't mean that it's not fun for them, I would still go along with recommending Porc to an intermediate rider.

    Rockstacker to Jackson's is significantly tougher than Porc. Calling those trails intermediate might do a good job of describing the sections between the multiple steep Expert sections and doesn't take into account the exposure either.

    Don't get me wrong, these are great trails, my favorites in Moab. But it's good that people are posting vids (that make Rockstacker and Jackson's look TAME compared to real life BTW, nice save on the last right turn of the rocky stairstep switchbacks on RS!) so the OP can wade through the subjective ratings.

    Slickrock, Sovereign, Porcupine would be my three suggestions if you wanted to get a sample of the main types of riding in Moab. Whichever one you like best, you can up the ante on your next visit. I guarantee you will find them all 100% fun, challenging and worthy, they are classics after all.

    JMH
    JMH,
    If you are referring to my post, I definitely wasn't not calling the trail intermediate. I should have been more clear (sorry). I was talking about how in Moab, one can ride trails that are harder than a rider's skill level.
    I learned to ride moab walking my bike. I think every trail I really like there, I walk some (I still can't get out of the bottom of the last canyon in Porc). The idea I was trying to get across is that some intermediate riders enjoy trails that are over their heads and some do not. So I think it is a good idea to look at the ride, the rider's skill, and the rider's mind set when choosing rides. Some intermediate riders I would be comfortable taking down the Portal and some I would want to keep on rides like Bar M and Klondike Bluffs.
    When we were giving "the talk" to new riders on tour, we always stressed that walking the bike is part of riding moab and it is a good idea to keep in mind where you are when choosing what risks you might take.

    I've run porcupine with very low level intermediate riders who have enjoyed it while they walk their bikes through many sections. Other riders of the same skill but different mindset would hate the ride.
    I like to look at riding this way: If I'm not walking my bike sometimes, then I'm missing out on some opportunities to improve. Nice thread!

  33. #33
    JMH
    JMH is offline
    Sugary Exoskeleton
    Reputation: JMH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    4,659
    Quote Originally Posted by axolotl
    I've run porcupine with very low level intermediate riders who have enjoyed it while they walk their bikes through many sections. Other riders of the same skill but different mindset would hate the ride.
    I like to look at riding this way: If I'm not walking my bike sometimes, then I'm missing out on some opportunities to improve. Nice thread!
    I think you are right, and I realize that a small part of my suggestion that the trails were underrated was my (now) desire to ride them clean, first try, no do-overs. Since I only make it down there twice a year at most, it can take a while to get it down. But of course you are right, that's not the way it all started for me either. I remember being absolutely riveted by the few sections of Porc that I deemed too close to the edge, and it seems like it was only yesterday but I realize it's going on 20 years. I kept coming back time after time, partly to ride the sections I walked, partly because it's a stunning trail.

    As part of a husband/wife riding team I have perhaps become overly conscious of the dragging along the innocent victim phenomenon, we jokingly refer to these as "divorce" rides. Chuky is a really skilled and confident rider (and already was when we met), so it's never been an issue, but I think a lot of interested SOs have been stopped short by inconsiderate ride selection. HOWEVER, I don't paint this thread with that brush, the OP and his SO sound like they are thoughtful, experienced riders and will have a spectacular visit no matter where they go. I want everyone to love Moab as much as I do, if that is possible.

    And yeah, this IS a good thread, thanks for the great responses.

    JMH

  34. #34
    banned
    Reputation: traildoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    5,540
    Quote Originally Posted by JMH
    I think you are right, and I realize that a small part of my suggestion that the trails were underrated was my (now) desire to ride them clean, first try, no do-overs. Since I only make it down there twice a year at most, it can take a while to get it down. But of course you are right, that's not the way it all started for me either. I remember being absolutely riveted by the few sections of Porc that I deemed too close to the edge, and it seems like it was only yesterday but I realize it's going on 20 years. I kept coming back time after time, partly to ride the sections I walked, partly because it's a stunning trail.

    As part of a husband/wife riding team I have perhaps become overly conscious of the dragging along the innocent victim phenomenon, we jokingly refer to these as "divorce" rides. Chuky is a really skilled and confident rider (and already was when we met), so it's never been an issue, but I think a lot of interested SOs have been stopped short by inconsiderate ride selection. HOWEVER, I don't paint this thread with that brush, the OP and his SO sound like they are thoughtful, experienced riders and will have a spectacular visit no matter where they go. I want everyone to love Moab as much as I do, if that is possible.

    And yeah, this IS a good thread, thanks for the great responses.

    JMH

    For me it boils down to whether the less skilled spouse has good judgement riding skills and doesn't mind walking difficult sections. Also does the OP's spouse wear protective gear? There is nothing worse than having an injured spouse.

    I have learned the HARD WAY to not encourage my wife to ride a section that might not be skilled enough to ride. My wife broke her wrist riding the entrance exam into A Line at Whistler. Our vaction was immediately over and my wife needed plating to repair the break, so we had to dive a 1,000 miles to get it fixed.

    She was a trooper, but isn't as tuff as a guy and I don't like to see her hurt.

  35. #35
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bradmtb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    243
    Thanks all for the trail recommendations and thoughtful consideration on skill levels and possible concerns. I received my Latitude 40 Moab map today in the mail, and I've been looking at all the trail recommendations on the map. I'll certainly get additional advise from the LBS where we're renting our bikes. We are both very excited about our trip next week, and our only concern at this point is the weather! Are many of the trails going to be getting snow?
    Every day above ground is a great day!

  36. #36
    Proud lame eBiker
    Reputation: Internal14's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    2,670
    We were there last weekend. The shuttles stopped at the LPS trailhead by the cattle gaurd. They said the UPS has too much snow still.

    Day 1: Sovereign-Salt Wash-some extra stuff at the outter reaches that turned out to be killer.
    Day 2: Amasa-Cliffhanger?-Rockstacker-Jackson FAVORITE!! The 'new' trail that runs upstream was just passable with the water coming just up to the edge at the beginning. When we finally had to cross we were able to skip across a few rocks and not even get wet. Although that next climb about blew out my knee that I had crashed on while comng down Jackson.
    Day 3: LPS-Porcupine. Super ride, and very Downieville-esque.

    To the OP....I'm not sure where you live in NorCal....but if you're remotely near Napa, do yourself a favor and go ride the Oat Hill Mine Rd. in Calistoga. Very good Moab training! If you guys can clean 95% of that ride up and down, you'll be very very well prepared for Moab riding. It's the closest thing NorCal has to Moab.

    I've had a major head cold since the day we headed out of Moab for home, not sure if it's the cold or that I miss Moab, but feel like I'm fighting a bit of depression. I miss those red rocks so....;-)
    www.velocitybicycles.comWhere customers become friends, not simply a dollar sign.

  37. #37
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bradmtb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    243

    Great post!

    Internal...I loved your post. We live in Pleasant Hill, and my wife rides Downieville...butcher, pauley creek, 1st,2nd,& 3rd divide, so as long as I'm patient, and we're both willing to portage when necessary, I think it will be fun.
    Your pics were great, it was nice to see at least 2 of your 3 looked like fellow Clydesdales (I race on the lighter side of Clydesdales).
    We're riding 5 days in Moab, but next Saturday, we're going to get up early and drive over to Fruita for an early morning ride and spend the rest of the day/evening at the Fruita festival. I'll post a trip report with pics and video when I return.
    Every day above ground is a great day!

  38. #38
    banned
    Reputation: traildoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    5,540
    Quote Originally Posted by Internal14
    We were there last weekend. The shuttles stopped at the LPS trailhead by the cattle gaurd. They said the UPS has too much snow still.

    Day 1: Sovereign-Salt Wash-some extra stuff at the outter reaches that turned out to be killer.
    Day 2: Amasa-Cliffhanger?-Rockstacker-Jackson FAVORITE!! The 'new' trail that runs upstream was just passable with the water coming just up to the edge at the beginning. When we finally had to cross we were able to skip across a few rocks and not even get wet. Although that next climb about blew out my knee that I had crashed on while comng down Jackson.
    Day 3: LPS-Porcupine. Super ride, and very Downieville-esque.

    To the OP....I'm not sure where you live in NorCal....but if you're remotely near Napa, do yourself a favor and go ride the Oat Hill Mine Rd. in Calistoga. Very good Moab training! If you guys can clean 95% of that ride up and down, you'll be very very well prepared for Moab riding. It's the closest thing NorCal has to Moab.

    I've had a major head cold since the day we headed out of Moab for home, not sure if it's the cold or that I miss Moab, but feel like I'm fighting a bit of depression. I miss those red rocks so....;-)
    Internal:

    I also enjoyed your post especially your comment about the new trail at the end of Jackson's.. The guys who built that trail got a lot of flack from some of the regular Moab secret trail gang who hang out on MTBR. The native indians use to use that trail and the secret trail bunch thought it out to be kept a secret for ever.

  39. #39
    JMH
    JMH is offline
    Sugary Exoskeleton
    Reputation: JMH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    4,659
    Quote Originally Posted by traildoc
    Internal:

    I also enjoyed your post especially your comment about the new trail at the end of Jackson's.. The guys who built that trail got a lot of flack from some of the regular Moab secret trail gang who hang out on MTBR. The native indians use to use that trail and the secret trail bunch thought it out to be kept a secret for ever.
    Is this the "secret" trail that has a sign at the parking lot and is clearly visible on the other side of the creek?

    The regular creek crossing was SUPER mellow two weeks ago, not sure what it's like now.

  40. #40
    banned
    Reputation: traildoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    5,540
    Quote Originally Posted by JMH
    Is this the "secret" trail that has a sign at the parking lot and is clearly visible on the other side of the creek?

    The regular creek crossing was SUPER mellow two weeks ago, not sure what it's like now.
    Sure is, but up until about eight years ago the trail was grown over with weeds so you could tell it was there from the parking lot. Since the indians didn't ride there horses on it it probably wasn't as wide as it is now.

    TD

  41. #41
    JMH
    JMH is offline
    Sugary Exoskeleton
    Reputation: JMH's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    4,659
    Quote Originally Posted by traildoc
    Sure is, but up until about eight years ago the trail was grown over with weeds so you could tell it was there from the parking lot. Since the indians didn't ride there horses on it it probably wasn't as wide as it is now.

    TD
    I can tell in your posts you are frequently being ironic, but can't always determine what your message is. Do you think the trail should be better marked so people can use it? If so, and in that location, I wholeheartedly agree. It seems that you don't agree with the local practice of trying to keep some trails on the lowdown to discourage traffic. In that case, I disagree. I believe that Local Knowledge should always be just that. It keeps trails and pleasant watering holes quiet that might otherwise be crowded by tour companies and 10 rider groups, and it gives return visitors something to aspire to.

    Man, this thread is going ALL OVER the place. Here are two things that are still quite a bit off topic, but might offer some food for thought:

    I spent some time riding in nature parks in Southern Germany a few years ago, riding trails that had almost certainly been there for thousands of years. Maybe they were originally started by Huns? Or maybe thousands of years before that by hunter-gatherers. It's easy to imagine the Romans widening them a bit and later kings reinforcing them for heavy carts. I bet that there were skirmishes there with allied troops as the Nazis retreated to Berlin just over 50 years ago. They are still peaceful cinder paths through the same beautiful woods that have stood for centuries. None of the locals even stop to consider whether or not a "secret" trail is "new" or "old" or who might have used it, nor do they seek to discourage use by future nature lovers. Is it a uniquely-American tendency to overuse the trails we love? Make them wide enough for quads? And then 5 years later just pave them? But who knows, maybe the Romans paved these paths, and then when local law was restored, people used the paving blocks to build homes. Somehow I don't imagine Moab returning to that same sort of primitive state, regardless of the number of cave homes currently occupied on Kane Creek Road.

    Oh, and another thing I have learned is that in the desert every river near a population center, whether current or ancient, has/had a path next to it. The idea that this was a secret is cute to me.

    JMH

  42. #42
    Ride and Smile
    Reputation: axolotl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    736

    Even more off topic

    Quote Originally Posted by JMH
    Is it a uniquely-American tendency to overuse the trails we love? Make them wide enough for quads? And then 5 years later just pave them?
    JMH
    Try this experiment:
    Walk on a popular dirt trail and count the number of people who will say hello.
    Then walk on a similar paved trail (is there such a thing) and count how many people say hello.
    I think we tend to be friendlier on the dirt.

    Like your thoughts and would like to add:
    I think it is helpful to remember that bikes are a real bummer for other users. I used to run our PC trails pretty much daily (prior to full suspension) and the experience was amazing. I never saw other runners. Bikes were rare and a chance meeting was a pleasant encounter. Fast forward to today and imagine a runner or hiker who must be constantly beon guard because one of us can come screaming around a corner at any time. Or how we can overwhelm someone with our sheer numbers. A two to four hour run or hike and one can encounter more than a hundred bike riders!
    We totally suck! So I try to suck less by:
    always stopping with a smile and a pleasant greeting to other trail users. When hikers or runners jump off the trail as they see me coming, I stop, greet them and let them go through while I wait for them.
    When I'm on foot (with a smile and friendly greeting) I never let bikes take the right of way. It's a bad habit for us to get into (expecting hikers to move out of our way). People have actually fell off their bikes cause they have expected me to get off the trail for them.
    Yes I know I'm way off topic but wanted to add a thought about how to use trails as we think about what trails to use.

  43. #43
    Clyde
    Reputation: LuckySomer's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    255
    +1

    Day 1- Soverign

    Day 2 - AmasaBack

    Day 3 - LPS-Porcupine
    09 Ibis Mojo - All Mountain Moab Edition

  44. #44
    banned
    Reputation: traildoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    5,540
    QUOTE=JMH]I can tell in your posts you are frequently being ironic, but can't always determine what your message is. Do you think the trail should be better marked so people can use it?

    Of course, I think all secret trails should be marked in a responsible way so others can enjoy them.

    If so, and in that location, I wholeheartedly agree. It seems that you don't agree with the local practice of trying to keep some trails on the lowdown to discourage traffic. In that case, I disagree.

    That is certainly your right to disagree and I can live with that, but don't get upset if I try to change your mind.

    I believe that Local Knowledge should always be just that. It keeps trails and pleasant watering holes quiet that might otherwise be crowded by tour companies and 10 rider groups, and it gives return visitors something to aspire to.

    "Gives visitors something to aspire to", so are you saying it gives visitors the opprotunity to seek out those secret local's only areas, and to be able to share those special places with their vistor buddies when they find them? What if the visitor finds out a really cool secret route that the locals don't know about, is it OK to ask the local's to stay off it?


    Man, this thread is going ALL OVER the place. Here are two things that are still quite a bit off topic, but might offer some food for thought:

    I spent some time riding in nature parks in Southern Germany a few years ago, riding trails that had almost certainly been there for thousands of years. Maybe they were originally started by Huns? Or maybe thousands of years before that by hunter-gatherers. It's easy to imagine the Romans widening them a bit and later kings reinforcing them for heavy carts. I bet that there were skirmishes there with allied troops as the Nazis retreated to Berlin just over 50 years ago. They are still peaceful cinder paths through the same beautiful woods that have stood for centuries. None of the locals even stop to consider whether or not a "secret" trail is "new" or "old" or who might have used it, nor do they seek to discourage use by future nature lovers. Is it a uniquely-American tendency to overuse the trails we love? Make them wide enough for quads? And then 5 years later just pave them? But who knows, maybe the Romans paved these paths, and then when local law was restored, people used the paving blocks to build homes.

    My friend who lives in Stuttgart says there are very few mountain biking trails less than two meters wide, is he full of baloney?



    Somehow I don't imagine Moab returning to that same sort of primitive state, regardless of the number of cave homes currently occupied on Kane Creek Road.

    Oh, and another thing I have learned is that in the desert every river near a population center, whether current or ancient, has/had a path next to it. The idea that this was a secret is cute to me.

    J there is more to the story than the previous information given, but to go into the details of how the locals busted their butts to bring that trail back into the system would be counter productive. It is what it is currently and it does give the riding and hiking public the opprotunity to keep from getting wet sometimes.

    I am also really curious who the locals were that cleaned out the original routing through the Tamarisk to get up to the parking lot. Ten years ago we use to have to duck under and crawl over hundreds of branches to get through that section. Then about nine years ago the locals got together for a big beerfest and barbecue out there and spent about five manhours cleaning up the Tamarisk to make it totally rideable. Those locals rock in my opinion because it sure made it nicer for us visitors. Thanks Guys and Gals!


    JMH[/QUOTE

  45. #45
    banned
    Reputation: traildoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    5,540
    Quote Originally Posted by axolotl
    When hikers or runners jump off the trail as they see me coming, I stop, greet them and let them go through while I wait for them.
    When I'm on foot (with a smile and friendly greeting) I never let bikes take the right of way. It's a bad habit for us to get into (expecting hikers to move out of our way). People have actually fell off their bikes cause they have expected me to get off the trail for them.
    Yes I know I'm way off topic but wanted to add a thought about how to use trails as we think about what trails to use.

    I personally think it is much easier for the hiker to take one step off the trail and let a biker ride by. What is lost by a hiker doing so?. A hiker is not trying to not dab on a hike, and I believe the right of way rules should be changed. I know that the very prestigious hiking club the Sedona Westerners agree with that logic and whenever I ride on the same trail as they are doing a hike they MOVE OVER. It is no big deal to them and I appreciate their giving up their right. It makes them feel good and I also get a kick out of it and really appreciate it .

    I guess if I came across you blocking the trail I would stop, smile, let you by and just think you should go thru the Westener training to get reprogramed. I know that's never going to happen though.

  46. #46
    Ride and Smile
    Reputation: axolotl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    736
    Quote Originally Posted by traildoc
    I personally think it is much easier for the hiker to take one step off the trail and let a biker ride by. What is lost by a hiker doing so?. A hiker is not trying to not dab on a hike, and I believe the right of way rules should be changed. I know that the very prestigious hiking club the Sedona Westerners agree with that logic and whenever I ride on the same trail as they are doing a hike they MOVE OVER. It is no big deal to them and I appreciate their giving up their right. It makes them feel good and I also get a kick out of it and really appreciate it .

    I guess if I came across you blocking the trail I would stop, smile, let you by and just think you should go thru the Westener training to get reprogramed. I know that's never going to happen though.
    it is easier. But you are kinda illustrating my unspoken point that we as riders can be self centered and inconsiderate. ie "not dab is more important than what someone else is doing.
    I am hoping we can be more considerate.

  47. #47
    banned
    Reputation: traildoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    5,540
    Quote Originally Posted by axolotl
    it is easier. But you are kinda illustrating my unspoken point that we as riders can be self centered and inconsiderate. ie "not dab is more important than what someone else is doing.
    I am hoping we can be more considerate.
    It would be interesting to know if anyone shares your point of view.

  48. #48
    Ride and Smile
    Reputation: axolotl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    736
    Quote Originally Posted by traildoc
    It would be interesting to know if anyone shares your point of view.
    Maybe.
    Noticed I was a little rude in my post. Sorry

  49. #49
    Explore More
    Reputation: DesertDog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    393
    Quote Originally Posted by bradmtb
    We're riding 5 days in Moab, but next Saturday, we're going to get up early and drive over to Fruita for an early morning ride and spend the rest of the day/evening at the Fruita festival. I'll post a trip report with pics and video when I return.
    So, the Fruita festival is over Mother's Day weekend?
    Didn't realize the timing of it when I scheduled some vacation days, but I'm off to the trails the 7th - 11th. I was planning on going to Sedona and Prescott, AZ, but I've never made it up to Moab and Fruita and that would make it a mighty fine time to finally make the trip!

  50. #50
    alien exchange student
    Reputation: Rider Mel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2004
    Posts
    106

    My two cents on the "off topic" components

    Axolotl and Traildoc, you both make some good points and based on the quality of posts and passion within them, you both certainly deserve respect.

    For what it's worth, I agree that it sucks when you are riding and encounter a lot of hikers/runners or even equestrians. It definitely can make a really fun stretch of trail less fun. That said, we really do need to share resources or we end up looking like the Nazi-esque early Baby Boomers who want to keep entire wilderness areas to themselves. (Note: I know this is a glaring generalization that invites criticism but I'm really just trying to paint a picture here.)

    An additional perspective comes to mind. As soon as you move away from the smallest or least powered mode of travel having right of way, a whole host of problems can arise. I've travelled a lot and in places where pedestrians yield to vehicles (of any sort) it is pure mayhem. It isn't too much different from say "you can ride your bike on the road but get out the way if a bigger vehicle comes along". Most of us don't subscribe to that approach. If a trail is very technical, it isn't nearly so much of a problem as the bikers go much slower and hikers seem to enjoy watching us crash (or not) on the nasty bits. On high-speed sections, however, there is potential for disaster.

    I frequently encounter hikers/runners on trail and always try to slow down, yield trail and say hello. I find, as Traildoc suggests, that they frequently just give up the trail to which I say "thanks" and some other mundane comment about the weather. It seems to me we both go away happy and feeling as though we are understood.

    Okay, sorry, I guess I need to focus more on caffeine delivery and less on rambling.

    Cheers!

    Mel

  51. #51
    banned
    Reputation: traildoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    5,540
    Quote Originally Posted by Rider Mel
    Axolotl and Traildoc, you both make some good points and based on the quality of posts and passion within them, you both certainly deserve respect.

    For what it's worth, I agree that it sucks when you are riding and encounter a lot of hikers/runners or even equestrians. It definitely can make a really fun stretch of trail less fun. That said, we really do need to share resources or we end up looking like the Nazi-esque early Baby Boomers who want to keep entire wilderness areas to themselves. (Note: I know this is a glaring generalization that invites criticism but I'm really just trying to paint a picture here.)

    An additional perspective comes to mind. As soon as you move away from the smallest or least powered mode of travel having right of way, a whole host of problems can arise. I've travelled a lot and in places where pedestrians yield to vehicles (of any sort) it is pure mayhem. It isn't too much different from say "you can ride your bike on the road but get out the way if a bigger vehicle comes along". Most of us don't subscribe to that approach. If a trail is very technical, it isn't nearly so much of a problem as the bikers go much slower and hikers seem to enjoy watching us crash (or not) on the nasty bits. On high-speed sections, however, there is potential for disaster.

    I frequently encounter hikers/runners on trail and always try to slow down, yield trail and say hello. I find, as Traildoc suggests, that they frequently just give up the trail to which I say "thanks" and some other mundane comment about the weather. It seems to me we both go away happy and feeling as though we are understood.

    Okay, sorry, I guess I need to focus more on caffeine delivery and less on rambling.

    Cheers!

    Mel
    Well said Mel, I am always prepared to yield if the hiker claims their right of way, it's just nice when they give it up for a higher purpose.
    Last edited by traildoc; 05-04-2010 at 11:03 PM.

  52. #52
    banned
    Reputation: traildoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    5,540
    BM:

    The three days are up and we haven't heard a word or sceen any pictures. Hope all went well on the trip.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails If I can only do 3...which ones?-img_0012_1.jpg  


  53. #53
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bradmtb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    243

    Sorry for the delay!

    Traildoc, et. al...my wife and I returned home to the Bay Area last night after 6 incredible days in Moab & Fruita. Thanks to all for the great tips/advice. We loved everything about our trip (except for the weather).
    I've got a ton of pics and video, but I need to come up for air before posting, but here's how the trip went...
    Flew into SLC last Wednesday afternoon and headed south in our rental Chrysler PT Cruiser over Soldier Pass in a snow storm, but made it to Moab in 3 1/2 hours. The winds were reported at 45 mph plus, but it was 78 degrees at 6pm in town.
    Rented our Santa Cruz Blur LT and Julianna the next morning from Moab Cyclery and decided to try Klondike Bluffs as our first ride. It was a good "get acquainted" ride for my wife and I. It hailed on and off for the first half of the climb up to the lookout where you leave your bike in the bike rack. Awesome view...on our way back down we managed to help out a group of riders who didn't know how to fix a broken chain. The Karma was with us as we finished the ride in sunshine. Anniversary dinner at the Sunset Grill, high up on the cliff overlooking Moab. The food was awesome, but then again if you add a stick of butter to anything it tastes pretty damn good!
    Friday morning we headed up to Sovereign/Salt Wash. We liked the mix of terrain better than Klondike. Rode/walked down to the Slickrock and wandered around for awhile, but realized you could ride there for days, so we rode back up the steep canyon trail. I was so turned around most of the ride, I didn't know where the heck I was even with a map, but thankfully my wife had her bearings and people were very helpful. We did the Sovereign/Salt Wash loop, and I think there were only 3 sections I couldn't ride. The views were incredible, and I was falling in love with Moab. Saturday we headed up to Fruita to ride Mary's Loop and Horse Thief Bench. When we arrived it was socked in with fog, and I was worried we would miss the views we hoped to see. There were maybe 10 cars parked/camping in the main lot. However, by the time we left there seemed to be hundreds. We hit the steep climb just to the left of Moore Fun and thought we were lost, but found our way to the cattle crossing and down the steep portage (didn't even try to ride down) to Horse Thief Bench. What a treat. Again, we were in awe of the views, and the flowing singletrack was perfect. While not very technical, the ride was alot of fun. By the time we made it back to the bike portage there were dozens of riders walking down. We hung out for a bit, and watched several failed attemps of riders trying to clear the descent. I could tell immediately that these folks were going to fail...not to say it can't be done, but not by anyone in that crowd.
    We spent the rest of the day over at the Fruita Fat Tire Festival and caught the Clunker Crit (hilarious). The atmosphere reminded me a little of the Downieville Classic crowd...typical "laid-back" mtb folk. We drove the 1 1/2 back to Moab for dinner and a few margaritas at Fiesta Mexicana. Sunday morning we took the Moab Cyclery shuttle up to LPS to ride Porcupine Rim. It was snowing the first 1/2 hour, and the portage down the first section of LPS was torture. The red mud was slick, and both my wife and I managed to slide down the trail until we were covered in red clay. Not far down the trail the snow had stopped, and the views started to appear. Porcupine was a nice change of pace. Higher speeds, nice ledges/drops, views, more views, and we got to see Alison Dunlap riding Porcupine!, and the weather became sunny during the decent. Everything was perfect until I took my first fall of the trip on the lower singletrack. I had just nailed a tough section, only to stall at one point and fall over because I couldn't unclip from my pedal. I used both hands to brace my fall, and my lower palms slammed onto rocks. Oouch! It still hurts...I managed to finish the ride, but as we rode back to town, I could barely grip the bar. We finished our trip with an early Monday morning ride out at Sovereign/Salt Wash on what was our only day of full sunshine (although it was 48 degrees). We are hooked, and plan to make Moab/Fruita an annual trip. I will do some editing, and post some video/pics soon. Thanks again to everyone for their advice and recommendations. My wife and I had such an incredible time. While the weather could have been better, I don't think I would have enjoyed the heat, so better cool than hot. I'm not real motivated to hit my local trails this week
    Every day above ground is a great day!

  54. #54
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    336
    Glad you had a great time, I'm heading out Friday while we wait for the melt here. Can't wait to see some pics!

  55. #55
    banned
    Reputation: traildoc's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    5,540
    Quote Originally Posted by bradmtb
    Traildoc, et. al...my wife and I returned home to the Bay Area last night after 6 incredible days in Moab & Fruita. Thanks to all for the great tips/advice. We loved everything about our trip (except for the weather).
    I've got a ton of pics and video, but I need to come up for air before posting, but here's how the trip went...
    Flew into SLC last Wednesday afternoon and headed south in our rental Chrysler PT Cruiser over Soldier Pass in a snow storm, but made it to Moab in 3 1/2 hours. The winds were reported at 45 mph plus, but it was 78 degrees at 6pm in town.
    Rented our Santa Cruz Blur LT and Julianna the next morning from Moab Cyclery and decided to try Klondike Bluffs as our first ride. It was a good "get acquainted" ride for my wife and I. It hailed on and off for the first half of the climb up to the lookout where you leave your bike in the bike rack. Awesome view...on our way back down we managed to help out a group of riders who didn't know how to fix a broken chain. The Karma was with us as we finished the ride in sunshine. Anniversary dinner at the Sunset Grill, high up on the cliff overlooking Moab. The food was awesome, but then again if you add a stick of butter to anything it tastes pretty damn good!
    Friday morning we headed up to Sovereign/Salt Wash. We liked the mix of terrain better than Klondike. Rode/walked down to the Slickrock and wandered around for awhile, but realized you could ride there for days, so we rode back up the steep canyon trail. I was so turned around most of the ride, I didn't know where the heck I was even with a map, but thankfully my wife had her bearings and people were very helpful. We did the Sovereign/Salt Wash loop, and I think there were only 3 sections I couldn't ride. The views were incredible, and I was falling in love with Moab. Saturday we headed up to Fruita to ride Mary's Loop and Horse Thief Bench. When we arrived it was socked in with fog, and I was worried we would miss the views we hoped to see. There were maybe 10 cars parked/camping in the main lot. However, by the time we left there seemed to be hundreds. We hit the steep climb just to the left of Moore Fun and thought we were lost, but found our way to the cattle crossing and down the steep portage (didn't even try to ride down) to Horse Thief Bench. What a treat. Again, we were in awe of the views, and the flowing singletrack was perfect. While not very technical, the ride was alot of fun. By the time we made it back to the bike portage there were dozens of riders walking down. We hung out for a bit, and watched several failed attemps of riders trying to clear the descent. I could tell immediately that these folks were going to fail...not to say it can't be done, but not by anyone in that crowd.
    We spent the rest of the day over at the Fruita Fat Tire Festival and caught the Clunker Crit (hilarious). The atmosphere reminded me a little of the Downieville Classic crowd...typical "laid-back" mtb folk. We drove the 1 1/2 back to Moab for dinner and a few margaritas at Fiesta Mexicana. Sunday morning we took the Moab Cyclery shuttle up to LPS to ride Porcupine Rim. It was snowing the first 1/2 hour, and the portage down the first section of LPS was torture. The red mud was slick, and both my wife and I managed to slide down the trail until we were covered in red clay. Not far down the trail the snow had stopped, and the views started to appear. Porcupine was a nice change of pace. Higher speeds, nice ledges/drops, views, more views, and we got to see Alison Dunlap riding Porcupine!, and the weather became sunny during the decent. Everything was perfect until I took my first fall of the trip on the lower singletrack. I had just nailed a tough section, only to stall at one point and fall over because I couldn't unclip from my pedal. I used both hands to brace my fall, and my lower palms slammed onto rocks. Oouch! It still hurts...I managed to finish the ride, but as we rode back to town, I could barely grip the bar. We finished our trip with an early Monday morning ride out at Sovereign/Salt Wash on what was our only day of full sunshine (although it was 48 degrees). We are hooked, and plan to make Moab/Fruita an annual trip. I will do some editing, and post some video/pics soon. Thanks again to everyone for their advice and recommendations. My wife and I had such an incredible time. While the weather could have been better, I don't think I would have enjoyed the heat, so better cool than hot. I'm not real motivated to hit my local trails this week
    Brad:

    Great report, looking frward to some pictures. The Moab mud will make clipless pedals difficult to release, that's one reason I like to use flats on those rides,

    If you ever want to try out Sedona give me a buzz. It's closer and we have a lot of scenic singletrack. I think your wife would enjoy riding with my wife.

    Was the Porcupine Singletrack more fun than Second Divide? Do you ever ride at Skeggs Point?

    TD

  56. #56
    mtbr member
    Reputation: bradmtb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Posts
    243

    Utah rules!

    TD, I think what ranks Porcupine above Second Divide are the views. They are similar from a rocky technical standpoint. I've been riding Downieville since '94, and it's my favorite area in CA to ride. Skeggs is one of the best we have here in the Bay Area, and I'd rank it just below Demo Forest nearby. Lake Tahoe and Downieville are the only semi-local trails I would rank anywhere near what we rode in Moab & Fruita, and we only scratched the surface. We are heading to Vegas & Zion in late June (with our kids), and I'll be riding Bootleg Canyon, Red Rock, and Gooseberry Mesa. I'll give you a buzz when we make it down to Sedona.
    Every day above ground is a great day!

  57. #57
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    24
    My fiance and I will be out there a week from today. We'll be stopping in Fruita to ride Marys on the way to Moab. We were out there 3 weeks ago and rode Porc and Klondike and some of the brand trails. She also rode some of Sovereign with some friends but the rain/thunder started. I was hiking with our dog.

    I know we'll be riding at least Amasa Back and Sovereign area.

    Anyone else going to be out there the same time? We'll be staying in a hotel from weds night till friday morning then camping with friends fri/sat night.

    I'm going to start researching more trails to ride/places to check out.

    *Oh, we are intermediate to high intermediate riders, but not too familiar with Moab trails.
    I've been going to Moab in my built 75 Bronco for 10+ yrs but never with my bike only wheeled and hiked.

  58. #58
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    336
    I just got back from a 4 day trip there.

    Kokapelli>UPS>MPS>LPS> Porc is dry. I highly recommend the Cyote shuttle if you want to shuttle it.

    And if you do Amasa Back, i'd recommend Jacksons too while your up there.

  59. #59
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Posts
    287
    If you do that you might as well do Hurrah Pass and climb up the cliff to the top of Amasa Back, That's a ride and a climb with a bike on your back to remember
    www.24hrBikeShop.com 10% of your purchase price is donated to the trail organization of your choice!

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.