Comment period for oil/gas drilling near Navajo Rocks/Mag 7 in Moab ends 8/28!- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Comment period for oil/gas drilling near Navajo Rocks/Mag 7 in Moab ends 8/28!

    I just saw this posted by Chile Pepper yesterday on Facebook. Worth a comment if you would prefer to not have a bunch of heavy equipment/roads/gas pads being placed out there over the next decade and staying for 30+ years.

    Here's the link:
    https://eplanning.blm.gov/epl-front-...up_register.do
    From there follow the directions in Chile Pepper's post. Not surprisingly, they make it very difficult to get to the point where you can actually make a comment. Almost like they don't want any comments at all.

    Comment period for oil/gas drilling near Navajo Rocks/Mag 7 in Moab ends 8/28!-moab.jpg
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  2. #2
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    Done. Get on it folks! After losing the white-cloud wilderness thing in Idaho, we have to start to work together, even if in just small ways.

  3. #3
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    Sixteen drilling pads, each 400x500 feet, miles of roads, miles of pipeline, and constant truck traffic for 30 years! Mag-7, Navajo Rocks, various Jeep trails, plus the best remaining open camp areas in the Moab area will be affected. How would you like to want to camp up off of Spring Canyon road and be looking directly at a heavy industrial site complete with well pumps, OSHA-compliant lighting, pipelines, and truck traffic?

    "Fidelity Exploration and Production Company (Fidelity) proposes to construct 16 new well pads, access roads, and gas pipelines 17 miles northwest of Moab, Utah. Each well pad could ultimately contain one to three well bores that may result in up to 48 oil and gas wells. Although actual operations are subject to change as conditions warrant, Fidelity plans to drill 3 to 6 wells each year over a period of 8 years. The anticipated life of a producing well is estimated to be 30 years. The proposed project would occur in Grand County, Utah in Fidelity’s Cane Creek Unit. Each pad would be constructed 400’x500’ in size and the drilling operations would utilize a closed-loop system. Existing two-track roads would be upgraded and new roads would be constructed to access the well sites. Fidelity proposes to install production facilities on each well pad. Each productive well would be equipped with a line heater, a heater-treater, a separator, five 500-barrel crude oil storage tanks, two 400-barrel produced water storage tanks, a 300-barrel fresh water storage tank, natural gas-actuated valve controllers, tank truck loading facilities, a flare, a combustor to eliminate tank vapors, a 500 or 1,000-gallon propane tank, and internal combustion engines to operate a well pump, a tank bottom circulation pump, and a generator. For pads that contain more than one productive well, production equipment would be installed for each well, as previously described, such that up to 3 separators, 15 crude oil tanks and 6 produced water tanks may be installed on a given well pad. Fidelity proposes to install a gas gathering pipeline from each well pad to a connection point on the Dead Horse Lateral main pipeline, which would transport natural gas to commercial markets. Oil and produced water would be trucked off well pad to appropriate processing facilities. Fidelity requests to delay interim reclamation operations on a well pad for up to two years from the completion date of the first and second drilled well on the well pad while Fidelity evaluates possibilities for drilling a future well(s). If a third well is drilled on a well pad, Fidelity would initiate interim reclamation operations within six months of the third well's completion date. Interim reclamation consists of reclaiming portions of the well pad not necessary for daily production operations. At the time of final plugging and abandonment of each well, the well pad would be reclaimed to the approximate original contour and seeded to achieve revegetation of native species. Further details regarding the proposed project can be found under "Documents" and the proposed project map can be found under "Maps"."

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by honkinunit View Post
    Sixteen drilling pads, each 400x500 feet, miles of roads, miles of pipeline, and constant truck traffic for 30 years! Mag-7, Navajo Rocks, various Jeep trails, plus the best remaining open camp areas in the Moab area will be affected. How would you like to want to camp up off of Spring Canyon road and be looking directly at a heavy industrial site complete with well pumps, OSHA-compliant lighting, pipelines, and truck traffic?
    And remember, this is all in the same general vicinity of the former Blue Dot trail that had to be rerouted to protect Bighorn Sheep habitat. Yet somehow it's cool to throw a few dozen football field sized(actually about 3 football fields together) gas pads out there and a bunch of heavy equipment. Here's the best map on there as it relates to recreation impacts. Keep in mind these will be tough to miss even off in the distance given the size and there are a couple basically right on top of Navajo/Mag 7.

    https://eplanning.blm.gov/epl-front-...Recreation.pdf
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  5. #5
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    DONE! Posting here in hopes that someone will read it because I'm not sure BLM will.

    Summary Comment: The proposed Fidelity West Fertilizer 16-pad Oil and Gas Project should not be approved by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Utah Moab Field Office. If allowed to proceed, this well project will disrupt Moab’s robust, sustainably growing tourist economy for a generation. The temporary drilling and construction jobs, most lasting weeks to months, and the handful of permanent jobs, located mostly offsite, are not worth the impact to an already vibrant economy.

    Moab Tourism: Tourists visit Moab’s unique natural environment to enjoy outdoor activities such as mountain biking, hiking, rock climbing rafting and OHV trails. These activities balance out Utah’s winter ski resort draw sustaining a steady stream of visitors year round. This balance has resulted in $7.5Billion in tourist spending in Utah and kept 132,000 people employed (source: Utah Tourism Industry Association, Tourism Works report http://utahtourism.org/wp-content/up...orks-Nov14.pdf). Moab specifically draws millions of visitors each year to enjoy the variety of summer outdoor activities and national parks. The share of international visitors continues to grow along with their increased spending rate per tourist. Several recent big budget Hollywood movies selected Moab as a filming location for its unique natural landscapes, further raising its international profile (source: Moab Sun News “Moab Tourism Grows and Diversifies” 8/19/12). The natural landscape of Moab is perhaps the biggest contributor in creating a vibrant, stable, and growing local and statewide economy.

    Oil and Gas Economy: Moab has seen several boom and bust cycles of the Oil and Gas economy throughout its history. Each population boom due to commodities mining gave way to a corresponding bust, leaving behind economic downturns and abandoned buildings (source: Utah.gov “After boom & bust cycles Moab just keeps pedaling”, June 1995). The case of an Oil economy is particularly sensitive due to international pressures. In the past year, the US Oil and Gas industry has seen over a 10% decline in employment and well operation. Economists attribute this to Saudi Arabia’s decision to lower oil prices. At current market rates of $40/barrel, many US oil wells run at a loss or are shut down (source: International Business Times “Crude Oil Price Declines Mean Steady Loss of Oil, Gas Jobs” 4/3/15). Due to massive international pressures of which US interests have no control over, there exists the potential that the well sites will remain dormant for extended periods of time. Thus a valuable asset, the natural terrain, will essentially be removed from the economy.

    Drill Locations: Perhaps the largest impact of drilling will be to Moab’s internationally renowned trail system. Moab’s unique and striking terrain has become an international draw for mountain bikers and several well sites directly impact and destroy several world famous trail systems including “Navajo Rocks” and “Magnificent 7” (source: BLM.gov “2015.08.12_West_Fert_Scoping_Meeting_Map_Recreati on.pdf”, 8/12/15). Several sites including 14-1-25-19”, 10-1-25-20, 25-1-25-19, 30-1-25-19, 29-1-25-19, and 21-1-25-18 are directly on top of or adjacent to mountain biking and OHV trail systems. The proximity of the oil well will essentially eliminate these historic and popular trails, resulting in a setback to Moab’s growing outdoor economy.

    Secondary Impacts: In addition to the gross negative economic effects and loss of recreation, the drill sites will adversely affect Moab’s overall environment. Since 1980, the US petroleum industry has accounted for nearly 1,000,000 barrels worth of oil spills (source: API.org “Analysis of U.S. Oil Spillage, August 2009), not including BP’s Deepwater horizon spill which is estimated to have leaked nearly 5,000,000 barrels alone (source: Kunzelman, Michael “BP seeks Gulf Oil Spill Size Ruling from Judge”, 1/20/13). While drill site safety has increased over the years, a non-zero risk remains for catastrophic destruction of Moab’s main economic driver. Relatively minor spills can also have devastating effects to the environment and tourism as seen in the 5/21/14 Salt Wash oil spill that contaminated the Green River (Source: Durango Herald “Culture Clash in Moab”, 7/11/14). Additionally each well site will require significant water resources from an already tight southwestern US supply (source: BLM.gov “Proposed_Action_West_Fertilizer_16-Pad_Project_Scoping_Period.pdf”). Increased heavy industrial traffic will compete with the 1,000,000+ annual national park visitors and drilling emissions create localized hazardous conditions.

    Conclusion: Due to significant economic and environmental impacts, the Fidelity West Fertilizer 16-pad Oil and Gas Project should be denied approval. The modest increase in temporary jobs for this project does little to offset the numerous negative effects to Moab, Utah, and the surrounding region. Millions of citizens in the region will benefit greatly over the next 30 years if this project is cancelled.

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