Blayn's Bike Shop Closes (for now)- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Blayn's Bike Shop Closes (for now)

    Yesterday was sort of sad for me. My local bike shop (Blayn's Performance Bike Shop in Springville, Utah), has closed for now.

    I was driving past the store and saw the "Closed for Business" signs in the window and said to myself, "No Way!"

    I pulled over and put my hands around my eyes, and face up against the store window glass to see if there were any bikes left in the shop, and there were! I also saw somebody loading a trailer in the back of the bike shop. So I ran around the back of the bike shop to see if I could find out what happend - was the business rent too high? not enough customers? what?

    I ran into the owner, Blayn himself. He told me that he just could not fix another Wal-Mart bike! He was tired of doing that and wanted to focus purely on high-end mountain bikes (or road bikes).

    I asked him if he was going to reopen the business somewhere else, and he told me he wasn't sure at the moment, but he was thinking of reopening the shop up in Orem at some future point (maybe spring 2010). Right now, he just wanted to take a break from all those Wal-Mart bikes.

    I told him I understood. I've seen those kind of bikes break down right in the middle of the trail, and watched kids and their dads push those things for several miles until they could get to where there was more help.

    If Blayn ever opens his store again, I'm going back. I had very positive experiences with him fixing both my Diamondback XR1 and my Titanium Titus Moto-Lite. Blayn always made both of those bike come back working way better than I ever expected.

    I'll miss his shop.
    "It is not the mountain we conquer, but ourselves." - Sir Edmund Hillary (Summits Mt. Everest, 29,035 feet - May 29, 1953)

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by pskelley5
    Yesterday was sort of sad for me. My local bike shop (Blayn's Performance Bike Shop in Springville, Utah), has closed for now.

    I was driving past the store and saw the "Closed for Business" signs in the window and said to myself, "No Way!"

    I pulled over and put my hands around my eyes, and face up against the store window glass to see if there were any bikes left in the shop, and there were! I also saw somebody loading a trailer in the back of the bike shop. So I ran around the back of the bike shop to see if I could find out what happend - was the business rent too high? not enough customers? what?

    I ran into the owner, Blayn himself. He told me that he just could not fix another Wal-Mart bike! He was tired of doing that and wanted to focus purely on high-end mountain bikes (or road bikes).

    I asked him if he was going to reopen the business somewhere else, and he told me he wasn't sure at the moment, but he was thinking of reopening the shop up in Orem at some future point (maybe spring 2010). Right now, he just wanted to take a break from all those Wal-Mart bikes.

    I told him I understood. I've seen those kind of bikes break down right in the middle of the trail, and watched kids and their dads push those things for several miles until they could get to where there was more help.

    If Blayn ever opens his store again, I'm going back. I had very positive experiences with him fixing both my Diamondback XR1 and my Titanium Titus Moto-Lite. Blayn always made both of those bike come back working way better than I ever expected.

    I'll miss his shop.
    Unless your in a major urban area no way around working on cheap bikes.... maybe he just needs a break....?
    Read my BLOG!

    just a guy who loves bikes and exploring

  3. #3
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    dang that sucks...i know business for most of the bike shops in the area have been a little slow. that just sucks that he went under.
    Last edited by nmpearson; 11-30-2009 at 08:49 AM.

  4. #4
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    Then don't work on them

    As a business owner he could just refuse to work on walmart bikes. I think the real problem is that there are too many people buying walmart bikes and too few buying Titus's. As long as the people are paying for the service and buying parts and accessories I don't see why a shop would not work on them. Its not as much fun for the mechanics, but alot of out jobs are not fun.
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  5. #5
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    I feel for the owner. You gotta do what you gotta do.

    I worked in a shop in the 70's. The owner started out refusing to work on anything that did not at least have a 3 piece crank. This filtered out Huffy, Schwinn and all the real junk. After awhile, when the bike boom ended, he started taking crap bikes, because he needed the money. Boy did that suck for the employees. Eventually, he even took a contract with a local nursing home to grease the wheels on their wheelchairs!

    One of the huge problems the shop had was that people would bring in a junk bike, we would do two or three hours work on it, and when the people came to pick up the bike, they would refuse to pay the bill, because it was more than they paid for the bike in the first place. This was after we had given them a clear estimate on the costs. Consequently, the shop ended up with a hoard of crappy bikes. The owner sold them in one big lot to some guy, and later one of the owners came in claiming the shop owner had stolen the bike from him and sold it! It ended up being a huge cluster.

    Running a bike shop is one of the toughest gigs around. Unless you've worked in a shop for a long time, you can't even imagine what it is like...

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by honkinunit
    I feel for the owner. You gotta do what you gotta do.

    I worked in a shop in the 70's. The owner started out refusing to work on anything that did not at least have a 3 piece crank. This filtered out Huffy, Schwinn and all the real junk. After awhile, when the bike boom ended, he started taking crap bikes, because he needed the money. Boy did that suck for the employees. Eventually, he even took a contract with a local nursing home to grease the wheels on their wheelchairs!

    One of the huge problems the shop had was that people would bring in a junk bike, we would do two or three hours work on it, and when the people came to pick up the bike, they would refuse to pay the bill, because it was more than they paid for the bike in the first place. This was after we had given them a clear estimate on the costs. Consequently, the shop ended up with a hoard of crappy bikes. The owner sold them in one big lot to some guy, and later one of the owners came in claiming the shop owner had stolen the bike from him and sold it! It ended up being a huge cluster.

    Running a bike shop is one of the toughest gigs around. Unless you've worked in a shop for a long time, you can't even imagine what it is like...
    Well.... That is why unless the customer is known to the shop, a prudent shop operator requires a 50% deposit on the job or at least 100% of the parts. That can be cash or a CC number with a signed authorazation. Special order/strange.expensive partes require payment in advance of at least the net cost of the parts(s) better yet, payment in full.

    IMO, too many shops are run like garage hobbys. There is an old saying.... want to totally f#$k up your passion for a sport? Make it your business.

    Owning a business is a tough row to hoe but from experience, I can say that doen right and with some luck (and a ton of work) it can be very rewarding.

  7. #7
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    Totally agree with the above statement. I'm the most broke i've been in a long time but let me tell you i'm way happier with myself than i have been in a while. We don't require money down on a repair, but they do always know the estimate beforehand. For special orders though you do have to go 100% down unless the customer is known. When we started out, i ended up with some random parts because the person's phone number was wrong. But yeah...with a ton of hard work it can work out. It is hard starting out because unless you have like 100k starting out for inventory(we sure as heck didn't), it's hard to get a good customer base and tons of sales. It's hard to help people understand that the reason you don't have as much inventory is because you haven't been open for 15 years. I hope some day to be up to par inventorywise with mad dog, bingham, and the other local bike shops.

  8. #8
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    Blayn is HARD CORE

    It was interesting to come across this thread in the forums... I live in Spanish Fork, UT (just south of Springville, UT, where Blayn's shop was) and BLAYN'S shop was the only shop close by... but MAN, did Blayn ever have an AWESOME shop!!

    I feel for the guy... I mean, if you opened a computer shop, and you had to work on 6 year old PCs, you'd want to break away from it, too... am I right?

    I hope he re-opens his shop in Orem, because the local shops ("MadDog Cycles", "Timpanogos Cyclery", "Urban Downfall") are awesome, but they'll have some awesome competition from Blayn, with his high-end INTENSE, ROCKY MOUNTAIN and JAMIS.

    Blayn is HARD CORE. I think Blayn is in his 50s, and he still does hard core downhill races on his tricked out, top of the line INTENSE M6.

    I had Blayn work on my Jamis Dakar XLT with NIXON fork and SWINGER rear. He took great care of me. Best of luck to you, man!

  9. #9
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    Blayn is a great guy! I used to go to the shop and he was always ready to help. Even if my bikes were old, he was always willing to work on them ( Cannondale Super Vs) and even would take time to just chat. I really hope he reopens his shop. I always wanted to buy more stuff from him, but money was short. I'd really like to make it up to him!
    It's characters like Blayn that makes going to a shop enjoyable. And yes, support your local shops, guys! You never know when they'll go under!

  10. #10
    RRM
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    Blayns Performance Cycling Grand Re-opening

    Great news! Blayn is opening his shop this Friday, February 12. At his regular time, 10 am.
    BLAYNS PERFORMANCE CYCLING
    His location is 1738 So. State St. Orem, Utah 84097

    Come on in and check out the shop and get free water bottle while they last. Support Blayn's in his new location!
    See you there!

  11. #11
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    This is Blayn's last week in Orem...Just want to give him a shout out as the best bike mechanic in Utah County. WE WILL MISS YOU!!

    Hope you open up a small hole-in-the-wall shop somewhere!!!

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