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  1. #1
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    What Fork For Flux?

    I'm a little lost with all the options. I like the idea of adjustable travel - but maybe I don't need it on this bike. On my Ventana I always had to lower the front end on climbs to lesson bobbing and wallow - but do you guys do that on the Flux?

    The intended purpose is to build a trail bike that's light enough for the odd xc race.

    Do I need the Talas - or just buy a Float? What about Rockshox?

    I have Chris King wheels - and want to re-use them. Do they have a 15mil axle conversion kit?

    Muchas gracias in advance!
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  2. #2
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    Do a search - this has been discussed a lot recently - plus you need to qualify if it's for a dw flux (09) or a tnt flux - the dw would be better equipped for a 120mm fork - but if you got a 120mm fork you should prolly get an adjustable one. I have a reba with maxle light on an 08 flux and love it. It can be set at 100 or 120mm. I have ridden but not owned a dw flux so am not qualified to speak to the dw.

  3. #3
    Crazed Country Rebel
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    Quote Originally Posted by wilks
    Do a search - this has been discussed a lot recently - plus you need to qualify if it's for a dw flux (09) or a tnt flux - the dw would be better equipped for a 120mm fork - but if you got a 120mm fork you should prolly get an adjustable one. I have a reba with maxle light on an 08 flux and love it. It can be set at 100 or 120mm. I have ridden but not owned a dw flux so am not qualified to speak to the dw.
    Thanks. This is for the DW Flux. I would like to build a bike that can be raced on rare occasion, and is light - but also makes for a nice all day epic trail ride bike.
    Stupid, but sometimes witty. Occasionally brilliant. Slow and fat though.

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  4. #4
    My cup runneth over
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    Quote Originally Posted by iheartbicycles
    Thanks. This is for the DW Flux. I would like to build a bike that can be raced on rare occasion, and is light - but also makes for a nice all day epic trail ride bike.
    I got the impression from another thread (Ventana forum?) that you didn't care for the DW suspension. Did I misunderstand or did you change your mind?

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by rmac
    I got the impression from another thread (Ventana forum?) that you didn't care for the DW suspension. Did I misunderstand or did you change your mind?
    What did I say specifically that gave you this impression?
    Stupid, but sometimes witty. Occasionally brilliant. Slow and fat though.

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  6. #6
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    1) The Flux climbs way better than the Saltamontes
    2) 100 is perfect
    3) I'm out of ideas right now but three points sounds professional

  7. #7
    No, that's not phonetic
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    I'd go for the 2009 120 Reba (Team, whatever). There are no real changes for 2010, so why pay more? I got a nice 20mm Maxle 120mm travel Reba Team dual air off FleaBay for $370 shipped, brand new (!) for my legacy Flux. I really like it. Unlike a Fox, you can get full travel. The adjustments are easy to make, and effective. They never need oil changes and the insides stay super clean. It came with a poploc remote which is just unnecessary bar clutter. I pulled the Black Box cartridge, unhooked the compression return spring, and made the cartridge non-remote. If you want help with this I can post more.

    I feel no need for travel adjustment on this bike, so I went for the Dual Air, which is light and extremely smooth. 120mm makes this a super trail bike. I personally find the Flux to be a bit of a handful with only 100mm up front. The steering gets very fast and it just takes a little too much concentration to really rail.





    Last edited by tscheezy; 09-30-2009 at 08:02 PM.
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  8. #8
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    yes, what tscheezy said....




  9. #9
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  10. #10
    Moosehead
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    +1 on the reba uturn. 100 works great for railing it or extended climbs, though you'll likely keep it at 120 for all else. also seems stiffer than the fox100rlc that preceded it on my 08 flux.

    CK has not yet come out with conversion kit to take QR front hubs to 15mm or 20mm, though some claim it is in the works.
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    Last edited by moosehead; 09-30-2009 at 05:18 PM.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by moosehead
    +1 on the reba uturn. 100 works great for railing it or extended climbs, though you'll likely keep it at 120 for all else. also seems stiffer than the fox100rlc that preceded it on my 08 flux.

    CK has not yet come out with conversion kit to take QR front hubs to 15mm or 20mm, though some claim it is in the works.
    The King QR -> 15mm kit is now available ( I have seen such a thing in real life), will be getting one shortly when I get a flux frame and 120mm float.

  12. #12
    Moosehead
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    Quote Originally Posted by banga
    The King QR -> 15mm kit is now available ( I have seen such a thing in real life), will be getting one shortly when I get a flux frame and 120mm float.
    Thanks banga, look forward to that happening. Per the CK website, the 15mm ISO hub is convertible from 15m to QR. Only reason for a similar and simple conversion kit not to be made available for existing QR hubs is to sell new units, but that doesn't seem to have been CK's style as their CS promotes keeping their hubs rolling long-term. Thumbsup.

  13. #13
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    I am in the minority here, but I went with the DT SWISS 130mm x 15mm thru. I also am running Chris King with the 15mm conversion and the new King 10mm conversion on the rear. I love it. The fork doesn't have real adjustability but it does have a lunch control feature that lowers the fork to around 80mm for climbing. I thought I would use it on the climbs because it is so easy, but really it climbs great even at 130mm.

    Ryan.

  14. #14
    My cup runneth over
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    nm...
    Last edited by rmac; 10-01-2009 at 09:19 AM.

  15. #15
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    I had a Float rl 100 on my old Flux (05). When I wrecked the frame I went to a 5 spot, so have the fork if you want it for cheap. It is in great shape- pop me a note. The 100 worked nicely on the non-DW link Flux- great climber, actually super-solid on everything but the loosest rockiest descents.

  16. #16
    Monkey Wrench
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    Chris King does have 15mm adapters for the 9mm QR hub - our shop even has them in stock...
    I ran my DW Flux with a 100mm Durin SL this season for racing, but I plan on putting a 120mm 15QR Fox RLC on it for next season. I want a more trail-worthy race bike and a beefier wheelset. If the majority of your riding is trail, the 120 is the way to go. I prefer to avoid adjustable travel forks if possible to reduce the complexity, weight, and cost.
    Let me fix your bike @ ordinarybicycle.net in Louisville, CO

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by tscheezy
    I'd go for the 2009 120 Reba (Team, whatever). There are no real changes for 2010, so why pay more? I got a nice 20mm Maxle 120mm travel Reba Team dual air off FleaBay for $370 shipped, brand new (!) for my legacy Flux. I really like it. Unlike a Fox, you can get full travel. The adjustments are easy to make, and effective. They never need oil changes and the insides stay super clean. It came with a poploc remote which is just unnecessary bar clutter. I pulled the Black Box cartridge, unhooked the compression return spring, and made the cartridge non-remote. If you want help with this I can post more.
    I have just received a Reba 120 dual air 2009 bought on ebay,
    Can you please post a step by step on how to make the cartridge non-remote?

  18. #18
    No, that's not phonetic
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    1. If you have the poplock cable installed, loosen the small allen screw on the mission control compression knob and remove the cable. Set the compression knob to open (not locked out). It should be there anyway due to the spring that you are disabling.

    2. Loosen the small allen screw on the gold floodgate knob, and lift the floodgate and compression knobs off the fork. There will also be a large white teflon washer in there. Put everything in a safe place. Also remove the bracket that acts as the cable stop for the remote.

    3. Using 24mm socket (with the face ground down so the wrench flats extend all the way to the socket face to avoid slipping) unscrew the motion control cartridge from the fork crown and then remove it by twisting gently as you pull it out slowly. There is an o-ring that needs to clear the threads that you don't want to roll or tear. Do this slowly and try not to spill any oil.

    4. Now comes the fiddly part. Using a very small flat screwdriver poke around in some of the Swiss-cheese holes in the damper sleeve to unhook the spring from the peg sticking out of the central motion control spindle. In good light you will see a peg about half way up the damper rod with the end of the spring hooked around it. You need to lever the end of the spring off this peg. This can take a few minutes of levering and trying different angles. When you get it free, it will probably release one turn and catch on the peg again. Unhook it a second time and you are done.

    5. With the compression set to open (the little ports at the bottom of the damper unit are revealed when you twist the compression rod) put motion control cartridge back in fork and snug it down lightly.

    6. Place the teflon washer on the mission control damper. Cut a piece of inner tube to a similar size with sharp scissors and place that over the washer, followed by the compression knob. Line the set screw on the floodgate knob up with the dimple in the compression rod and while pushing the floodgate knob down, tighten the allen screw. You want to preload the knob stack a little and have the inner tube provide friction on the compression knob. If you get the thickness right, the knob will turn easily but with a damped motion.

    Finally, the compression knob is very smooth. I took it off again and using a small file, I notched the outer rim slightly and this offers very positive grip.
    Last edited by tscheezy; 10-15-2009 at 01:54 PM.
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  19. #19
    Bite Me.
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    Tscheezy - You should have this posted as a sticky in the Shocks forum - it gets asked about once a month.
    When I see an adult on a bicycle, I do not despair for the future of the human race. ~H.G. Wells

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by tscheezy
    1. If you have the poplock cable installed, loosen the small allen screw on the mission control compression knob and remove the cable. Set the compression knob to open (not locked out). It should be there anyway due to the spring that you are disabling.

    2. Loosen the small allen screw on the gold floodgate knob, and lift the floodgate and compression knobs off the fork. There will also be a large white teflon washer in there. Put everything in a safe place.

    3. Using 24mm socket (with the face ground down so the wrench flats extend all the way to the socket face to avoid slipping) unscrew the motion control cartridge from the fork crown and then remove it by twisting gently as you pull it out slowly. There is an o-ring that needs to clear the threads that you don't want to roll or tear. Do this slowly and try not to spill any oil.

    4. Now comes the fiddly part. Using a very small flat screwdriver poke around in some of the Swiss-cheese holes in the damper sleeve to unhook the spring from the peg sticking out of the central motion control spindle. In good light you will see a peg about half way up the damper rod with the end of the spring hooked around it. You need to lever the end of the spring off this peg. This can take a few minutes of levering and trying different angles. When you get it free, it will probably release one turn and catch on the peg again. Unhook it a second time and you are done.

    5. With the compression set to open (the little ports at the bottom of the damper unit are revealed when you twist the compression rod) put motion control cartridge back in fork and snug it down lightly.

    6. Place the teflon washer on the mission control damper. Cut a piece of inner tube to a similar size with sharp scissors and place that over the washer, followed by the compression knob. Line the set screw on the floodgate knob up with the dimple in the compression rod and while pushing the floodgate knob down, tighten the allen screw. You want to preload the knob stack a little and have the inner tube provide friction on the compression knob. If you get the thickness right, the knob will turn easily but with a damped motion.

    Finally, the compression knob is very smooth. I took it off again and using a small file, I notched the outer rim slightly and this offers very positive grip.
    Thank you

  21. #21
    No, that's not phonetic
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    Here are the notches I filed in for grip. They work and feel great:

    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

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