Sultan sizing question- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Sultan sizing question

    Now that the Sutan has been out for a while, I need to ask this- are most guys around 5'11" - 6' tall riding large or medium Sultans? I have a large but am wondering if a medium would be a better choice since I run 28" - 29" wide bars and a 90mm or 100mm stem. A medium would shorten the wheelbase by an inch or so as well. Any thoughts? I do like sitting more upright anyway but on certain really techy and twisty sections,I feel the large is a bit big/long given my bar/stem setup.

    I rode my Racer-X today (which I really like) after several weeks on the Sultan and for fast riding, especially through the rough, I am spoiled by that DW Link...ya don't know it till you jump on something else!

  2. #2
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    I'm 5'10" and ride a large. 80mm stem and 27" wide bars. Best fitting Turner I've owned. That being said, a certain other Sultan owner is about 6'2" and also rides a large with a 90mm stem and 29+" wide bars. So you might be able to go down to the smaller size with the wider bars. Personally, I like being stretched out a little for the climbs. I have not felt limited by the larger size in the twisties.

  3. #3
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    6' and ride a Large w/ 28" bars & 70mm stem. I'm actually waiting on a setback post...so no smaller frame size for me!


  4. #4
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    Interesting- it isn't the twisties or even the tight twisties. It is the really tight and steep (and slow)rocky areas that you drop into and keep twisting and dropping but that may also be just having to get used to the longer wheelbase. I still need some times on those sections (that type of techy stuff is not encountered very often here) but the fit is comfortable.

  5. #5
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    I'll also add that I have absolutely no issues whatsoever with tight stuff. I think the dw sultan handles a bit snappier in the tight stuff than the previous iteration.


  6. #6
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    Well, I have only recently started to do some really techy stuff so there is that learning curve anyway. I can't blame the bike much for that.

    I am absolutely blown away but how well the DW Link works on the Sultan. The traction edge is phenomenal and the efficiency is pretty impressive. The bike just sticks to the ground around rough corners and rocky DHs. If it isn't a fireroad-smooth climb, it just rules and is fun to ride over the biggest roots and rocks. I dont thi.k it gives up anything to the racer-like Titus even in fireroad situations at the same weight.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flyer
    Interesting- it isn't the twisties or even the tight twisties. It is the really tight and steep (and slow)rocky areas that you drop into and keep twisting and dropping but that may also be just having to get used to the longer wheelbase. I still need some times on those sections (that type of techy stuff is not encountered very often here) but the fit is comfortable.
    sounds like you just need better riding skillz...might want to consider Cactuscorn's DH clinic

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2TurnersNotEnough
    I'm 5'10" and ride a large. 80mm stem and 27" wide bars. Best fitting Turner I've owned. That being said, a certain other Sultan owner is about 6'2" and also rides a large with a 90mm stem and 29+" wide bars. So you might be able to go down to the smaller size with the wider bars. Personally, I like being stretched out a little for the climbs. I have not felt limited by the larger size in the twisties.
    you forgot to mention that "other" owner is very handsome and referred to by the ladies as half-horse (no, not buck teeth)

  9. #9
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    Why would I need skillz when I can compensate with a shorter wheelbase or just tell people I ride gnarly stuff?

    Quote Originally Posted by FoShizzle
    sounds like you just need better riding skillz...might want to consider Cactuscorn's DH clinic

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flyer
    Why would I need skillz when I can compensate with a shorter wheelbase or just tell people I ride gnarly stuff?
    good point...you can lie to everybody about what a badazz you are, sort of like jcarpenter does regularly. i am sure he is ok but he does not even have a national DH championship under his belt

  11. #11
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    I know this thread will go DH fast so let me clarify. I haven't crashed or gotten in over my head. This is a question about wheelbases and sizing, not an admission of my lack of skillz- that admission comes later, usually after a bad crash.

    Mods, can we go ahead and ban Fo now?

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by FoShizzle
    good point...you can lie to everybody about what a badazz you are, sort of like jcarpenter does regularly. i am sure he is ok but he does not even have a national DH championship under his belt
    LOL...wrong again!


  13. #13
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    Yeah but his decals rock. Can you please go back to work so your stock price keeps doing well or is it too late for that?

    QUOTE=FoShizzle]good point...you can lie to everybody about what a badazz you are, sort of like jcarpenter does regularly. i am sure he is ok but he does not even have a national DH championship under his belt[/QUOTE]

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by jncarpenter
    LOL...wrong again!
    national champ in monkey spanking does not count fool

  15. #15
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    You guys may be right. A medium Sultan may be a bit small. Some other companies' mediums are a bit bigger (Titus, Niner, Lenz, etc.) Thanks for all the input.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by FoShizzle
    national champ in monkey spanking does not count fool
    Oh....it counts, duntz!


  17. #17
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    5 11 on a medium v1 = Perfection

    I'm 5' 11" and ride a medium with a set-back post and a 100mm stem. I'm also running a 120mm fork which will effectively shorten the TT.

    I had a large with a 70mm stem but it never felt right.

  18. #18
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    Is it a new DWL Sultan? The DWL Sultans may be a bit smaller than the 2008 versions.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flyer
    Is it a new DWL Sultan? The DWL Sultans may be a bit smaller than the 2008 versions.
    It's a pre-DWL, so it's top tube is 23.5" vs the DW which is 23". But remember that I'm running a longer fork which will decrease the effective top tube length.

    Large DW's have 24" TT's, pre DW's have 24.5TT's.

    What lenght TT do you normally run?

  20. #20
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    On 26" bikes I tried to stay around a 24" ETT. On 29ers, I prefer a similar setup for long rides and XC riding but am starting to consider a shorter ETT and wheelbase for more slow-speed and tchnical riding. I think I have my solution....will know in a week or so.

  21. #21
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    I don't agree with your logic Flyer, a shorter TT/wheelbase will put your position farther forward on the bike, the exact opposite of what you would want on a techy dropin section like you mention.

    I haven't noticed any real drawbacks in the technical stuff here in the Springs, maybe the real tight uphill switchers but that's it. The TT and wheelbase on mine is longer than any other trail bike I've owned.

  22. #22
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    You may be right but I was going to use a setback seatpost and a shorter stem to sit a bit more upright and get my weight a bit further back. Maybe I'll just turn the large Sultan into a lighter and fast XC bike and use the next (and heavier-duty) bike and set it up to be more of a technical-trail bike.

    I may try out my plan and see what approach works best before making any permanent changes. Three FS 29ers doesn't seem to be too much, does it? Horses for courses, was it

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flyer
    I may try out my plan and see what approach works best before making any permanent changes. Three FS 29ers doesn't seem to be too much, does it? Horses for courses, was it
    I would wait and see what Jerk_Chicken has to say....he's usually spot on with these issues. I'm sure he'll be posting soon.
    Extreme stationary biker.

  24. #24
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    Well, he wasn't a sizing expert but even then, he would probably have more valuable insight than you do.

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flyer
    Well, he wasn't a sizing expert but even then, he would probably have more valuable insight than you do.
    Awesome.
    Extreme stationary biker.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by rroeder
    I don't agree with your logic Flyer, a shorter TT/wheelbase will put your position farther forward on the bike, the exact opposite of what you would want on a techy dropin section like you mention.
    Not necessarily true unless you are comparing otherwise identical frames of differing sizes.
    Quote Originally Posted by buddhak
    And I thought I had a bike obsession. You are at once tragic and awesome.

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flyer
    On 26" bikes I tried to stay around a 24" ETT. On 29ers, I prefer a similar setup for long rides and XC riding but am starting to consider a shorter ETT and wheelbase for more slow-speed and tchnical riding. I think I have my solution....will know in a week or so.
    <input id="gwProxy" type="hidden"><!--Session data--><input onclick="jsCall();" id="jsProxy" type="hidden">

    Greater wheelbase is a double edged sword. I think it is most handy as the speeds increase, and more cumbersome at slower speeds, but even that is not always true.

    Rule of thumb is that longer is more stable, shorter is more fun It really depends on your riding style and personal preference. Only one way to find out what you like.
    Quote Originally Posted by buddhak
    And I thought I had a bike obsession. You are at once tragic and awesome.

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