Sram 9.0 vs XTR why?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    New question here. Sram 9.0 vs XTR why?

    Yeah I know this can go in the EDT forum but I always seem to get great advice here .

    I've been thinking of switching both shifters and my rear der to the $RAM setup. I've heard many good things about the 9.0 shifter pods and Rder. Is it worthwhile switching from my current non-RR XTR setup? Basically I have the joneses due to upgradeitis.
    Are they easier or harder to shift? (pressure wise)
    Are they more or less responsive?
    Are they easier or harder to fine tune?
    Do they keep their settings as long of longer?
    Does the b-tension work better?
    Is it quiter?
    Is there a reason to consider the X.0?
    Yatta yatta.
    All opinions welcome.

    Also: has any of you ham-fisted shifting hacks noticed the paddles on the XTR pods bend over time? This is my third set and all of them eventually start rubbing the release trigger, especially on the Fder control where more force is required to shift.

    Many thanks.
    Faster is better, even when it's not.

  2. #2
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    Sram X-9/XO

    My RM Blizzard has XT shifter pods, XTR Rder, XT Fder and I like the shifting...when it is dialed in. I used to spend a lot of time "tweaking it" to keep it dialed in. The slightest variance in cable tension and/or grime throws it off.

    My new red hotness (5 Spot) has X-9 shifters, XO Rder, XT Fder and I LOVE the shifting. I notice it the most when I have to shift up to a bigger cog on a steep climb and I don't time my pedal cadence correctly. The XO is smooth even if I shift while mashing the pedals. It is runoff season here so every ride involves lots of creek crossings. My shifting has not been affected by the mud and grime that I know must be in the housing by now. I also like the thumb lever-only setup of the X-9 shifter a bit better. I think the pressure required to make a shift might be a bit more with the SRAM stuff due to the stiffer spring in the XO Rder. However, it is not so stiff that it is a negative.

    I can't speak to longevity yet or ease of tuning because mine haven't needed any adjustment. Zero. I will say that the XO Rder seems durable because I fell over sideways trying to ride through a creek and the drive side of the bike landed in river rock with no damage to the Rder.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bikezilla
    Yeah I know this can go in the EDT forum but I always seem to get great advice here .

    I've been thinking of switching both shifters and my rear der to the $RAM setup. I've heard many good things about the 9.0 shifter pods and Rder. Is it worthwhile switching from my current non-RR XTR setup? Basically I have the joneses due to upgradeitis.
    Are they easier or harder to shift? (pressure wise)
    Are they more or less responsive?
    Are they easier or harder to fine tune?
    Do they keep their settings as long of longer?
    Does the b-tension work better?
    Is it quiter?
    Is there a reason to consider the X.0?
    Yatta yatta.
    All opinions welcome.

    Also: has any of you ham-fisted shifting hacks noticed the paddles on the XTR pods bend over time? This is my third set and all of them eventually start rubbing the release trigger, especially on the Fder control where more force is required to shift.

    Many thanks.

  3. #3
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    Interesting...

    I should receive some X9 shifters and an X0 mech this week to replace my current XTR. It's never been perfect and I've enjoyed the odd dabble I've had with the new SRAM stuff...

  4. #4
    KCC
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    Good job!

    I have the X-9 triggers and derailleur for about 4 months now, coming from XT.

    Is it worthwhile switching from my current non-RR XTR setup? IMO Hell Yeah.
    Are they easier or harder to shift? (pressure wise) Easier, with the 1.1
    Are they more or less responsive? The 1.1 is a quicker shift.
    Are they easier or harder to fine tune? Fine tune I would say the same.
    Do they keep their settings as long of longer? Yes, works well with dirt and crud.
    Does the b-tension work better? ?
    Is it quiter? I think so. I can hardly hear my shift but can hear the people in front of me and behind on group rides.
    Is there a reason to consider the X.0? ? Pricey though.

    The main reason I switched is that I knew I would be getting a 5 Spot and did not want to run the new dual control Shimanooo shifters. I wanted to run my own choice of brakes and sometimes I need all the help I can get in doing track stands in technical spots, which meant sometimes I push slightly down on the brake levers for balance, with the dual control I could not do that. So far the shifting performance has blown me away. Regarding long term durability I can not answer.

  5. #5
    AOK
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    some XO feedback

    I switched my XCE from a 9-speed XT setup to XO with the twist shifters.

    I loved my old 8-speed XTs, but the 9-speed shifters seemed flimsy & had a lot of friction when shifting. Also had to tweak them a lot. Besides, the XO stuff looked really cool... :-)

    I have been very happy with XO. It took me longer than usual to get them dialed in, but I have literally not touched them since (roughly 6 months). Shifting in general is smoother than my XTs. I love the "micro adjust" of the front shifter. One click instantly solves annoying front der rub. They are a good bit lighter than the XT setup as well.

    After almost 10 years of rapid fire shifters, it took me all of 30 minutes to get used to the twisters.

  6. #6
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    I've upgraded (yes UPgraded) both my trail and DH bike to SRAM. I use X9 and X.0 rear mech on both...best upgrade I've done to my bikes in a while!

    I don't use twist shift, but the trigger shifters. Fist it took me no time at all to get use to the shifting - which in my opinion is better than the Shimano.

    The 1:1 ratio is great and I think the amount you have to push for each gear is reduced with the SRAM shifters.

    The gear indicator is also better than my old Shimano - less prone to break and not in the say of my brake levers (on my DH bike, I like to run my shifter between my brake and grip)

    The SRAM derailleurs don't slap on the chainstay like Shimano.

    I always hated Shimano derailleur because of that bolt (that holds the cable) sticking out on the side...I was constantly bending them after hitting rocks, rending the derailleur useless. Then when trying to unbend it, it would break Plus it's got straight cable entry..no more cable loops on the back to get stuck in branches.

    Setting up the rear derailleur is a breeze!! Very easy!!

    Did I mention the SRAM drive train looks cool?

    Now I can't wait for SRAM to come out with their front der. I also hear they will have newly redesigned paddles next year.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Acadian
    ...Now I can't wait for SRAM to come out with their front der. I also hear they will have newly redesigned paddles next year.
    Thanks for the info all!

    New paddles next year? I can't wait that long...guess I'll just have to upgrade...again . Now X.0 or 9.0 der? choices, choices.
    Faster is better, even when it's not.

  8. #8
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    I've only had one problem....

    Quote Originally Posted by Bikezilla
    Thanks for the info all!

    New paddles next year? I can't wait that long...guess I'll just have to upgrade...again . Now X.0 or 9.0 der? choices, choices.

    Sometimes if I dump 3-4 cogs at once the downshift paddle (X.9) will stick at the end of its stroke. I think what I am doing is catching the upshift paddle slightly in the process, which causes funkiness with the internal ratchets, which causes the sticking. Does this make sense? Perhaps the 2005 redesign will address this. But for $125 from PricePoint for the RD/trigger set-up I'm not sure you can go wrong.

    Does my advice count given that I don't ride a Turner (RX 100)? I do have a large polished XCE hanging on the wall. Anyone interested?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikezilla
    Is it worthwhile switching from my current non-RR XTR setup?

    You need a reason to upgrade? Hmmm... Interesting concept.

    I haven't tried them yet, but I'm going to order a set of X.9 here shortly. The main thing I like about them, is they separate the shifting and braking functions between the thumb and finger(s). Your thumb is free to do all the shifting, you can cover the brake lever with your index finger all the time, and keep the other three fingers on the handle bar. With rapid fire, I do occasionally run into the situation where I have to shift while braking.

    The SRAM_ derailleurs are supposed to eliminate any problem with the derailleur clanking on the Horst link. I'm not sure if this is a factor or not, my XTR doesn't clank on my XCE.

    As far as X.O. vs. X.9. Isn't weight the only real difference? I think so. My XTR rear derailleur lasted all of three months before a branch in the chain busted my b-tension bracket. I decided right then and there that lightweight race parts belong on lightweight race bikes. Thus my preference for the X.9. Your mileage may vary.
    Last edited by Tullebukk; 06-08-2004 at 03:18 AM.

  10. #10
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    I'm interested...

    Quote Originally Posted by NAHTNOJ
    Does my advice count given that I don't ride a Turner (RX 100)? I do have a large polished XCE hanging on the wall. Anyone interested?
    I'm interested in knowing how you like the RX 100 compared to the XCE. How do the two bikes compare?
    Last edited by Tullebukk; 06-08-2004 at 03:16 AM.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikezilla
    Thanks for the info all!

    New paddles next year?.
    ya when hunting for the July issue of MBR, I was going through other UK mags on the shelves and there was little thing about them. I had heard about it at races, but this kindda confirmed it. But I don't think the change will be that drastic!

    2 of my bikes are converted to SRAM...one left to go!

  12. #12
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    Some info on the new paddles here...

    Quote Originally Posted by Bikezilla
    New paddles next year? I can't wait that long...guess I'll just have to upgrade...again . Now X.0 or 9.0 der? choices, choices.
    A bit of info on the 2005 SRAM_ stuff here:

    http://www.bikemagic.com/news/articl...N/3820/v/2/sp/

  13. #13
    Bodhisattva
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikezilla

    Also: has any of you ham-fisted shifting hacks noticed the paddles on the XTR pods bend over time? This is my third set and all of them eventually start rubbing the release trigger, especially on the Fder control where more force is required to shift.
    [/size]
    My XTR shifters are over 3 years old & still work good as new. I'm eager to try the new SRAM paddle shifters and plan on doing so when I move to CO next month. But I hate, say again, hate twist shift. Make sure you try them before you buy.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Squeaky Wheel
    But I hate, say again, hate twist shift.
    that makes 2 of us... reason why I never tried SRAM until they came out with their new trigger shifters.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Acadian
    ya when hunting for the July issue of MBR, I was going through other UK mags on the shelves and there was little thing about them. I had heard about it at races, but this kindda confirmed it. But I don't think the change will be that drastic!
    Thanks Ac' yet another reason to get the UK mags. They always dish first. The scooped the 5 Spot review, the Moment review, the X5 review, posted the Nitrous first yatta yatta... It's beyond me how overseas publications can get current info to press faster than mags located in the same STATE as the mfgrs.

    Tulle' thanks for the four-eleven. I cracked a B-tension plate last year...it took the whole season to figure out what was causing my top pully to intermittantly ride the cogs. $himano was good about it and replaced the whole der n/c the new one works well enough but somehow just isn't the same...not sure why.

    Na'oj I saw that price combo too. Hard to pass up. And FWIW I've been on Rapid Fire triggers for ~8 years...call me retro if you must, but I've never been interested in gripshift...seems just plain wrong for technical riding to constantly change one's grip angle. BTW, lurkers are always welcomed... Other experiences can only be a good thing, and I sure as heck post in the other forums.

    About the $RAM ders keeping adjustments better...this sounds interesting. My LX, XT, and XTR ders seem to only need adjusting occasionally, usually after the new cable has streched a bit. Maybe a barrel tweak here or there but I haven't found it particulary troublesome.

    Okay I'm in. Thanks all.
    Faster is better, even when it's not.

  16. #16
    rr
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikezilla
    BTW, lurkers are always welcomed... Other experiences can only be a good thing, and I sure as heck post in the other forums.

    Hey Zilla, I've been running ESP since 1999 and ran a full XTR setup for 6 months in 2002 and went back to ESP. I run the gripshift and have no trouble with it in technical situations, I like the trim adj. for the front der.-no chain rub. I replaced my old ESP rear der. last fall with an X.O and its very nice. The lower cable tension keeps it in adj. better/longer than the XTR. I was thinking about trying the new Sram triggers because I liked the XTR triggers, but I don't want the FD chain rub.

  17. #17
    KCC
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    I took advantage of the Price Point deal also.

    Another advantage of the $ram triggers that I really noticed last weekend bombing down the hills on my new Spot is that you can shift up with your thumb at the same time keeping a finger on the brakes. Shimanoo you had to take a finger of the brake to hit the shift.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by KCC
    The main reason I switched is that I knew I would be getting a 5 Spot and did not want to run the new dual control Shimanooo shifters. I wanted to run my own choice of brakes...
    I found this on Bikemagic.

    "Only mentioned in passing by Shimano but clearly there in the line-up is a pleasant surprise for anyone who's fretting about Dual Control taking over the world. These are the new-for-2005 RapidFire+ shifters, Shimano having certainly not given up on them completely. They're called M751, which puts them at XT level, and they'll be available in silver or black. Happy now?"

    Sounds like Shimano is listening. Have you ever heard the saying, "Pigs get fat. Hogs get slaughtered."


    Quote Originally Posted by Tullebukk
    As far as X.O. vs. X.9. Isn't weight the only real difference?
    tscheezy ran an X-9 rd on his road trip and seemed to think an X.O would have provided "a little more pivot durability." Plus the X.O is far sexier with its machined and carbon bits.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by CrashTheDOG
    I found this on Bikemagic.

    ...Tscheezy ran an X-9 rd on his road trip and seemed to think an X.O would have provided "a little more pivot durability." Plus the X.O is far sexier with its machined and carbon bits.
    Thanks Crash.

    Anyone else notice $RAM quoted "Iceaxe" in their advert? Pretty funny eh? It is on pg. 107 in the May MBA as well as other mags. The MBA add dosen't refrence MTBR but it the add does directly state it is the source in other mags.

    Top of the page in GREAT BIG BOLD TYPE
    Quote Originally Posted by $RAM Advert
    "That's it I'm changing over to SRAM. I adjust my freaking derailleur every time I ride!
    Faster is better, even when it's not.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikezilla
    Basically I have the joneses due to upgradeitis.
    'Zilla, while you're infected you might as well get on a King wheelset too .

  21. #21
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    I might change

    I currently run LX pods and an XT rear derailleur. I might consider trying the SRAM when you can no longer get the old style "low normal" derailleur. After 15 years of moving the derailleur one way to get it to shift I have no desire to try to learn a new shifting system. I dont think I would waste money on the XO derailleur. Although they might shift a little better than X9 or X7, I tend to destroy them at least once per year and 130 bucks sitting on the right side of my bike waiting for the next big nasty rock to come by does not appeal.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Flying Wombat
    I currently run LX pods and an XT rear derailleur. I might consider trying the SRAM ... I tend to destroy them at least once per year and 130 bucks sitting on the right side of my bike waiting for the next big nasty rock to come by does not appeal.
    Damm roadie heritage... that must be why they're on the right side to begin with. I reflexively bail on the right side...always unless I'm pushed or something. Naturally that's the side the bike ends up on. We really need a left side drive train...come to think of it, the dammed roadies are to blame for hanging the der down there to begin with.

    Crash, you know I want a King set of wheels... somehow I can ditch a perfectly good $500 crankset and ~$300 drivetrain but can't bring myself to retire a $650 set of pinging wheels with 16 pawls. I need help.
    Faster is better, even when it's not.

  23. #23
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    I've got X.9 shifters with X.0 rear and it works a treat. I've ran XTR rears in the past usually with XT shifters and the SRAM setup has been more consistant holding settings, the rear X.0 is pretty strong too I've whacked mine a few times now and at times hard enough to have me worried, but so far so good. I've bent two hangers but the X.0 is fine. They are completely rebuildable too, not sure where I would get parts but that's what I've been told.

  24. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tullebukk
    I'm interested in knowing how you like the RX 100 compared to the XCE. How do the two bikes compare?
    I'll do my best, but I don't think that I will be terribly helpful. I've followed your posts. You are in Europe somewhere and fretting over replacing your XCE, correct? Totally understandable. I wouldn't want to give one up. Anyway, here goes.

    The reason I didn't stay on the XCE was fit. The TT was too short. I could get comfortable with a 135 mm stem, but then I had a constant "over the bars" feeling on descents. Plus, I was riding it in the middle of winter, which also limited my saddle time. Had it fit, I would have slapped on an air shock and called it a day. Given my fit issues, I'll limit my comments to ride quality.

    It's not a direct comparsion, because we are talking air vs. coil shocks, but the Turner design in considerably plusher. The XCE gave me an almost disconnected feeling, but then again, I was used to my hardtail. The RX gives plenty of feedback as to what is happening beneath you, but is in no way harsh. It be tuned to cough up about 80-85% of the plushness of an XCE without sacrificing pedaling efficiency. I don't seek out drops, but if I hit a small one, such as a water bar, which is around a foot, the RX just barely bottoms. It ramps up significantly, which is something I never felt in the XCE. I prefer the former, being a younger, faster type. The way I have it set now, the RX uses about 3.25" of travel ALL the time, and then has that final bit for the really big hits. It suits me well.

    What sort of terrain are you riding and how fast are you trying to go? I went with the RX cause I wanted something that would climb great and soak up hits so that I could ride longer. Downhill performance was last on my list, because I'm a sissy. The XCE is much more stable, "point and shoot" ride for downhills. But with the RX, with its great balance and steering, I can slice around everything. Once again, thats the way I'd rather do it.

    Hopefully you can glean some useful info from this. Please ask other more specific questions if you have them, and give me some feedback on your terrain and style.

  25. #25
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    One last question,

    Any reason I should not use a medium cage? It'll be a 2 ring setup but would a medium prevent me from doing anything in the future? Is there any benifit to using the med cage? (it may be a little late as I've already ordered the med cage )
    Faster is better, even when it's not.

  26. #26
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    Something alittle different........
    IMHO I like both SRAm and shimano so I use the combo deal.
    I have sram grip for the front der and rapid-fire for the rear der.
    I love the set up of this, after i got use to it.
    Have it on 2 of my bikes.
    Don't know if that helps.......
    Kevin

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikezilla
    but can't bring myself to retire a $650 set of pinging wheels with 16 pawls. I need help.
    Ebay is all the help you need and should pay for most of the new King's...

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikezilla
    One last question,

    Any reason I should not use a medium cage? It'll be a 2 ring setup but would a medium prevent me from doing anything in the future? Is there any benifit to using the med cage? (it may be a little late as I've already ordered the med cage )
    I believe the med. cage is for cogsets with a higher gear ratio or less of a gear range, they are supposed to shift quicker. Whats the largest cog your running?

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by rroeder
    I believe the med. cage is for cogsets with a higher gear ratio or less of a gear range, they are supposed to shift quicker. Whats the largest cog your running?
    Std XTR set: 32-11
    Faster is better, even when it's not.

  30. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikezilla
    Std XTR set: 32-11
    I tried to find info. on their website but didn't see anything. I'm sure it will work fine but I think the med. cage is designed for smaller cassettes like the 28t or 30t where you have less chain.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by rroeder
    I tried to find info. on their website but didn't see anything. I'm sure it will work fine but I think the med. cage is designed for smaller cassettes like the 28t or 30t where you have less chain.
    Thanks Double-R, (I have a 11x34 btw my mistake)

    I downloaded their owner and shop manuals. They do give specs but it's somewhat difficult to interpret.

    The long cage will take a 45T "total" while the medium cage will only take a 37T "total". So yes the long cage will handle a bigger combo but what combo?

    Both will take an 11T min & 34T Max cogset and both will take a front difference of 22T between chainrings.

    Here is the compatibility as listed.
    Cogsets:
    11-30, 11-32, 12-32, 11-34, 12-34
    Chainrings:
    22-32-42/44, 24-34-46, 26-36-46/48

    Well anyway, I decided to play it safe and change my order to the long cage. I may want to use a big ring again someday and right now I don't understand the limitations and I don't see a compelling reason to go with the medium cage.
    Faster is better, even when it's not.

  32. #32
    KCC
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    I make it clear that, especially with SRAM Derailleurs, cage length is CRUCIAL. There is no shift advantage to a medium cage (tension pulley is still the same distance from the cogs on long cage)....the only advantage is ground clearance. I will only put medium cages on single ring set-ups. Everything else gets a long cage. The long cage offers more room for error when installing your chain (especially important for fullsuspension bikes), and has no other disadvantages.
    This is a quote from Flow 559 on the Sram Forum. I do not know if he knows what he is talking about but it makes sense.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikezilla
    Well anyway, I decided to play it safe and change my order to the long cage. I may want to use a big ring again someday and right now I don't understand the limitations and I don't see a compelling reason to go with the medium cage.
    Ya, it's all Greek to me too. Cage length seems to be a highly depated topic on the EDT forum with both sides making some valid... and not so valid points. FWIW I've been running the X.O long cage on my 2x9 setup without any issue.

  34. #34
    KCC
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    Also the longer cage does a better job of taking up some of the chain slack which would help out, a little, the chain slap dilemma.

    I too have the long cage and performs highly.

  35. #35
    M070R-M0U7H FR3NCHI3
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    I use Med cage on all my bikes...never had any issues!

    BTW..I just thought of one downside of the SRAM drivetrain, and maybe it's just me? But on my DH bike, it's a ***** to take the wheel off when the chain is still on the bike! If I take the chain off, no prob, but if the chain is still on it's more difficult than with a Shimano derailleur.

    anyone else have this problem?

  36. #36
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    Sram V Shimano

    I stopped buying shimano because of the cost of replacement parts, designed in obscilesence, and cassets that wouldn't stay true. I remember my first bike had a shimano crankset (STX) that had a proprietary spider and when I bent the big ring on a log and the middle ring "downshifting" they wanted $90 for the two replacement rings and nobody made aftermarket rings for STX. I later tried running XTR cassets and they repetedly bent outward over the lower cogs. Shimano would warranty them but it didn't help much when it occured in the middle of the mountains. Shimano replaced the XTR 4 times and then said I should try XT which they garunteed would stay strait. Three XT's later, tired of dealing with the problem I switched to Sram and 4 years later I haven't bent one yet. I've even talked a hardcore shimano fan freind of mine with connections at shimano into running Sram and it solved the same casset problem he was having. They also wanted $90 for a replacement for an XT shifter I broke when you can buy a full set cheaper. I havent destroyed any of the sram I have, even the one I cracked the indicator window out of still works well and the halfpipe shifters I hated and cut down 3 years ago still work great. Buy the X7s unless weight is most important, it works 99% as well for a lot less.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by slowrider
    .... I later tried running XTR cassets and they repetedly bent outward over the lower cogs. Shimano would warranty them but it didn't help much when it occured in the middle of the mountains. Shimano replaced the XTR 4 times and then said I should try XT which they garunteed would stay strait. Three XT's later, tired of dealing with the problem I switched to Sram.
    Hmm. I've never bent a cassette I've have two XTR cogsets on two different bikes. I didn't even know it was possible to bend one until I read a post a while back. It's probably b/c I'm a torqueless wimp. I'll probably give the $RAM cogset a try when it's time to replace.
    Faster is better, even when it's not.

  38. #38
    rr
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    Quote Originally Posted by Acadian
    I use Med cage on all my bikes...never had any issues!

    BTW..I just thought of one downside of the SRAM drivetrain, and maybe it's just me? But on my DH bike, it's a ***** to take the wheel off when the chain is still on the bike! If I take the chain off, no prob, but if the chain is still on it's more difficult than with a Shimano derailleur.

    anyone else have this problem?
    Yes, the springs are stiffer so its harder to move the der. out of the way. I've found the easiest way is to shift to the smallest cog like normal and grab the der. and pull it back by hand untill the upper pulley is out of the way. Do the same thing when reinstalling the wheel. It's easier to do this when the bike is upside down on the seat and handlebars, it's impossible(almost) to reinstall the wheel with the bike upright unless someone is holding the bike while you install the wheel.

  39. #39
    KCC
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    Quote Originally Posted by Acadian
    BTW..I just thought of one downside of the SRAM drivetrain, and maybe it's just me? But on my DH bike, it's a ***** to take the wheel off when the chain is still on the bike! If I take the chain off, no prob, but if the chain is still on it's more difficult than with a Shimano derailleur.

    anyone else have this problem?
    Yeah I do, thought it was just me. Feels like I am forcing something.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by CrashTheDOG
    Ya, it's all Greek to me too. Cage length seems to be a highly depated topic on the EDT forum with both sides making some valid... and not so valid points. FWIW I've been running the X.O long cage on my 2x9 setup without any issue.
    Long cage functions fine in a 2x9 setup. I am using a X.O long cage with a 11-34 xt casette and 22/32 front rings with a FSA bash ring replacing the big ring. I do notice less chain slap noise than with the XTR I was using and the shifts are very crisp. FWIW - I haven't had to make a single adjustment in the 2+ months I've been using it.
    Nothing to see here.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by Acadian
    BTW..I just thought of one downside of the SRAM drivetrain, and maybe it's just me? But on my DH bike, it's a ***** to take the wheel off when the chain is still on the bike! ...anyone else have this problem?
    No itís not just you. I used to loath taking off the rear wheel just for that reason, but after watching tscheezy swap out a wheel a couple of times down in Moab and taking note I've got it down to a science. I'm not sure I can explain it with any clarity but here goes... (1) always shift down to your smallest cog before removing the wheel, (2) like rroeder, I always find it helpful to flip the bike upside down (3) when replacing the wheel, this is where it's going to get fuzzy, place your thumb on the back of the pivot where the spring terminates and place your forefinger on the front of the pivot at the upper pulley and apply opposing force. This should allow the cassette to clear the upper pulley and slide into your pivots. Give it a try, I may have the placement of my fingers messed up but it's basically a thumb/forefinger type motion. Clear as mud right?


    Quote Originally Posted by Bikezilla
    Hmm. I've never bent a cassette I've have two XTR cogsets on two different bikes. I didn't even know it was possible to bend one until I read a post a while back. It's probably b/c I'm a torqueless wimp.
    I ride with a guy that is built like a 'zilla, easily 230, and rides a 40+ lb. Yeti AS-X. A month or so ago he managed to fold over a cassett as he stood up out of the saddle to climb. Nothing all that steep either. FWIW I think it was a lower end SRAM cassett.

  42. #42
    AOK
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    Deraileur ratings explained...

    Quote Originally Posted by Bikezilla
    The long cage will take a 45T "total" while the medium cage will only take a 37T "total". So yes the long cage will handle a bigger combo but what combo?
    Here is a short explaination of the ratings. I can't really take credit for it - this is paraphrased from an old printout I made from a post on the EDT forum...

    The rating (i.e. 37T) is how many excess "teeth" worth of chain the deraileur can "absorb" in certain gear combinations.

    If you measure your big-big combo, you can get roughly how many "teeth" of chain you have. For example, if you take 44 (big ring) + 32 (biggest cog), you get 76 teeth. This combination has streched your chain to the fullest, so you have 0 "teeth" of chain left over.

    Now take another gear combo. Say your big ring and smallest cog.
    You get 44 +12 = 56. Since your chain is 76 "teeth" long, your deraileur will have to "absorb" 20 teeth in this gear combo. Since the SRAM is rated at 37 teeth, this is within it's capacity.

    So if your worst case gear combo works out to be 37 or less teeth left over, then the 37T rated rear deraileur will work for you.

    FWIW, I think you are right to get the long cage. I am running a long cage XO on my XCE and it works great.

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by AOK
    ...The rating (i.e. 37T) is how many excess "teeth" worth of chain the deraileur can "absorb" in certain gear combinations...So if your worst case gear combo works out to be 37 or less teeth left over, then the 37T rated rear deraileur will work for you...

    FWIW, I think you are right to get the long cage. I am running a long cage XO on my XCE and it works great.
    Thanks, that clears up a few things.
    FWIW, I wasn't questioning if a long cage would be a problem, but rather at what point would a short one be limited...and indirectly what would be the benifit of going with a short cage.

    From your description, a short cage (37T) would have issues with taking up the slack with certain small-small combinations. I had incorrectly assumed it would have problems with certain big-big combos.

    So if I understand,
    On a 22-32-44 crank with a 11-34 cogset:
    The MAX tooth combo would be 44+34=78
    The MIN tooth combo would be 22+11=33
    The Slack to absorb would be 78-33=45
    So a long cage could absorb the slack from an "idiot's low crossover" but a medium cage could not go below 22+19=41 (or some similar combo)
    Is this right? Do medium cage users have such a limited granny range?
    Faster is better, even when it's not.

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