Nylon bolt torque- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Nylon bolt torque

    Took my first ride on the 5 spot today... spectacular. I will post more later.
    My question is how tight the nylon bolts in the rear triangle (near the rear axle) should be torqued. I was putting on a chain stay guard and heard this ticking noise as I was putting it on.... thought it was the workstand .... but turns out the nylon bolt at the end of the chain stay was pretty loose allowing some movement. So tightened it about a turn and the other about half a turn.

    Are these to be torqued at 9ft/lbs?
    they are no where near that now.

  2. #2
    No, that's not phonetic
    Reputation: tscheezy's Avatar
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    Official Turner doctrine is that those get the full 9ftlb/12.5nm torque as far as I know. I think that is too tight for such a tiny bolt and am worried about stripping them, so I just make them "quite snug". They should most definitely not be loose. Tightening them down allows the clevis (forked) end of the chainstay to pinch together and hold the pivot's shaft tight between the forks. The clevis and the shaft then move as a single unit. The shaft rotates inside the bushings which are pressed into the seat-stay portion of the pivot. When the bolts are loose, the part that moves is the clevis joint in relation to the shaft. That's not what you want.
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  3. #3
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    Thanks tscheezy... snug it is.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by jaghouse
    Thanks tscheezy... snug it is.
    Well I can tell ya that on my new 5 spot, the right side came loose, when we checked both sides the left side was about 40lbs... No im not kidding, this reading was with a very accurate torque wrench, when setting both sides to the recommended 9-12 lbs, they were still loose.. on my frame im closer to 20lbs., then the other side came loose a week later, now they are fine, I contacted turner about this, they did not give me a solid number to go by, even though the paper work my freind has says 9-12 [for the xce], i dont know why it is different, freind has a 5er to, and never had a problem - he has polished rear I have painted... dont know if that means a thing, but both side came loose once with in the first 3 weeks i had the bike, Oh for what its worth turner sent me a whole new bushing kit for the rear, have not used it.. the rear is fine now after re-torquing both sides again.

  5. #5
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    Torque values depend on bolt material, coating, etc. but I did find a table that gave these torque values for a 5mm bolt: Grade 8.8 =4 ft. lbs; Grade 10.9=5.8 ft. lbs; and Grade 12.9=7 ft. lbs. I believe grade 8.8 is your typical automotive bolt. It would seem the recommended 9 ft. lbs. is too much for this size bolt.

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