Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    Lay off the Levers
    Reputation: Bikezilla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    10,128

    Noob-ish Question: Big Fork Sag?

    It seems like a simple thing but perhaps not.

    How would one determine how much sag to use on a big fork like the Tripple-Eight?
    The thing is that 30% would mean 60mm sag and man, that seems like a whole lot for the front to sink into just sitting on the bike.

    I'm running the firm spring, and even with no preload I'm only getting about 45mm and I'm 240lbs

    I'm thinking that even if I used a std spring, 60mm sag would make the fork divy and sloppy, no? Maybe this is a break-in thing?

    For now I'll just run it as is but till I can get the bike out on the trail I'd thought I'd grab an opinion or two...
    Faster is better, even when it's not.

  2. #2
    Outcast
    Reputation: Renegade's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    8,589
    yea, I got an opinion. You mis-spelled "tripple".
    A new, unbroken-in fork won't sag as much anyway. Go ride the beotch on the street if you have to, just to break it in.
    ****

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    6,207
    Set your sag with you standing and ready for some heat.

  4. #4
    Amphibious Technologies
    Reputation: SCUBAPRO's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    3,472
    Sag on that bike should be measured standing on pedals in the attack position, not seated.
    "The best you've ridden is the best you know" - Paul Thede, Race Tech

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    8,605
    I never found fork sag as a useful tuning measurment. Run the spring recomended for your weight then go up or down based on the ride characteristics.

  6. #6
    ~~~~~~~~
    Reputation: airwreck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    5,873
    I'll second the sag not applicable, there is too much personal preference and specific trail tuning going on. I think 45mm sounds fine and if you can't adjust the compression to get it feeling good then try the lighter spring. In fact, if the bike is feeling too slack, trying the lighter spring for more sag would be a good call.

  7. #7
    Team Sanchez
    Reputation: El Chingon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    4,368
    I"m gonna agree with Keen and Airwreck. I go by pogo feel rather than sag. I like my forks on the soft side, and then tune out the bottom out with Compression settings, and oil levels. That is the beauty of the Zoke.
    Team Sanchez; "Always hittin the upper lip"

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2005
    Posts
    6,207
    Do you guys really think Zilla would have the self control to put away a tape measure?

  9. #9
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    30,658
    I had the "stiff" spring, which should have been ok for my ~200lbs, but I think I'm 200lbs with all the gear, and once I drink 5lbs of water and sweat it out, I'm a little bit below.

    The stiff spring was way over-sprung IMO. I've got a medium now, and it "seems" ok, but I haven't been able to take it through super-chunk yet. I can say that with the preload backed all the way off, there still isn't a crazy amount of sag. I wouldn't worry too much about sag, but 33% on a fork is a lot of sag, but correct spring rate is way more important.



    Anyone want to buy a $200 "heavy" Ti spring? I'll sell it to ya for cheap!, only $125.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  10. #10
    Moosehead
    Reputation: moosehead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,902
    Seems like the firm spring might work well for you on trail, in attack mode, as a bigger aggro dood. Everyone loves the plush, but as a Clyde, I hate it when the front end gives way.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: nybike1971's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    1,884
    Keep another thing in mind. Now you are setting sag sitting down, in attack position, any way you want but still on flat ground. Once you hit something steep, where it counts with a 888, all of a sudden your weight distribution is biased a lot more in the front and if you started out with 30% sag you could be now close to 40 or 50% into the travel before you have even felt a bump.

    There was a very nice post by the go-ride guys (I think it was Scott and not Kris) in the Ventana forum last year or so, detailing how they set up their forks for DH racing and how they run them pretty around 20% sag for this exact reason.

  12. #12
    Knolliac
    Reputation: EastBay_Slim's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    417

  13. #13
    Lay off the Levers
    Reputation: Bikezilla's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2003
    Posts
    10,128
    Quote Originally Posted by All Mountain
    Do you guys really think Zilla would have the self control to put away a tape measure?
    D!ck.

    Quote Originally Posted by Renegade
    yea, I got an opinion. You mis-spelled "tripple".
    You mispelled "Yeah" ... Double-D!ck.


    Tnx for the feedback folks.(Renny and AM included) It seems to make sense. That's what I was getting at about it would have to be redic-u-soft to get 33%.

    The sitting vs standing and aggro attack on a decline is an excellent point.
    Like I said in the OP if I had the opportunity to ride-tune this thing I wouldn't have wasted the electrons asking.
    Faster is better, even when it's not.

  14. #14
    long standing member
    Reputation: PCinSC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2005
    Posts
    3,091
    Quote Originally Posted by ancientwisdom
    What he said.
    Quote Originally Posted by Scott at Go-ride
    I recommend running about 20% sag on any DH fork.
    For the big guys it's also important that the fork have pre-load, compression and bottom out adjustment. Mine doesn't, which is why it bottoms out under my fat ass on every 2 ft drop. With the RC3 (and comparatively slimmer ass) you should be golden. I'm jealous (of the fork, not the ass).

    Yeah, this post was ghey.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation: rscecil007's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    2,766
    I'll have to agree with those saying they through the sag recommendation out the window as well. I always try to follow the sag recommendations on the 3 Marz I've had (Z1 Light, and 06 and 07 66 RC2x), and it's always too damn divey and soft feeling.

    I tend to tune mine the same way El Ching does.
    If jackasses could fly this place would be an airport.

  16. #16
    Moosehead
    Reputation: moosehead's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    1,902

    Zoke Technical Guidance

    Looks like Zoke recommends a highly complicated setup which is a finess combination of: (1) only the slightest bit of sag to provide plush comfort, along with (2) strong, firm setting to handle the harshest pounding . . . .
    Attached Images Attached Images

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.