Results 1 to 16 of 16
  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    12

    newbie to Burner geometry

    Any tips on how to get used to Burner geometry? I'm coming from an old Fisher and it sure feels like I'm driving someone else's car. Thanks.

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Aug 2014
    Posts
    897
    Keep riding. When you are coming from a bike with older geo a newer geo bike is going to feel different. You will get used to it.
    '15 Niner Jet 9 Carbon
    '19 Karate Monkey
    Motobecane Boris
    Raleigh Willard 3, Furley & Militis 3 (SS)
    Nashbar Carbon Road

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation: David R's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,127
    Ride it more.

    Or post some information on you and your set up so people have something to base their suggestions on?

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    12
    Size L
    XT build
    Fox 34 CTD Kashima
    rear shock Fox Float CTD

    I'm still trying to find a good fit with my saddle and handlebar height. Also pedaling seems more of a chore than with my old bike. Maybe the bigger wheels?

    The Burner does love to go downhill though.

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation: David R's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,127
    How tall are you? How long is the stem? Any spacers under the stem? The DW bikes do pedal really well [for mid-travel full suspension bikes], I never really used the climb switch on my 5spot (but to use it on my Knolly).
    How much sag are you running? Tyres? If you're used to a hard tail with faster rolling tyres of course the Burner will feel like a barge. But as you've noticed, it's worth it for when you're going down! Just keep experimenting, you'll get it right sooner or later.

  6. #6
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    12
    6' tall
    90 mm stem
    3 spacers, my old bike had 2
    I'm not sure how much sag my LBS set it up. It was pretty darn plush the first day. Today it seemed a little hard.
    Pacenti Neo Moto tires

    My handlebars seem way too wide also at 740 mm. My old bike's bars are 660 mm long. I know everybody goes real wide now but it feels like I'm in a rowboat.

    Thanks for the help.

  7. #7
    mtbr member
    Reputation: polarflux's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    164
    For your bar width I would say your stem length is a bit long. Your old Fischer probably had a much shorter top tube so that long stem and wide bars probably has you leaning way too far forward. The Burner has long chain stays, so you want to get your bike set up with your weight back a bit so you can get the front wheel up when you need to. I'd try a 70mm stem max, maybe even a 60 or a 50. I'm 6'0" and ride a large burner with a 50mm stem and 780mm bars which feels good. You could always put the narrow bars back on and go stay with the longer stem but you will be sacrificing some high speed stability there. Also, you go to a place like Moab that requires muscling the bike around you will find that you're on the end of those 740mm bars wishing for more width. You'll get used to them quickly.

  8. #8
    Elitest thrill junkie
    Reputation: Jayem's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2005
    Posts
    30,646
    Quote Originally Posted by XX hihat XX View Post
    6' tall
    90 mm stem
    3 spacers, my old bike had 2
    I'm not sure how much sag my LBS set it up. It was pretty darn plush the first day. Today it seemed a little hard.
    Pacenti Neo Moto tires

    My handlebars seem way too wide also at 740 mm. My old bike's bars are 660 mm long. I know everybody goes real wide now but it feels like I'm in a rowboat.

    Thanks for the help.
    That's a way way long stem for modern geometry. I'm at 45mm with both of my bikes and it's my happy-place for stems.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: David R's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Posts
    2,127
    It sounds like a lot of it is just down to the huge jump between new and old.
    740mm bars are pretty average "these days", even on trail/xc bikes, and much wider isn't uncommon. 90mm is pretty long for a modern bike with wide bars and longer reach/TT, definitely try something shorter. And invest in a shock pump so you can set your sag correctly and dial in the feel of the rear shock for how you prefer it.

    But most of all, get out there and ride the heck out of it!!

  10. #10
    mtbr member
    Reputation: CragRat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    219
    i had same feelings , but then i was unsure if the longer travel bigger bike was the way to go from the start so took a leap of faith as mates reccomended it
    i was going from a Horst Flux that i had 8 years and see myself as a XC type just out for a ride rider nothing extreme or mad, no racing just out for a ride normally 30 - 40 mile hilly routes..the burner felt great at first although big and heavier an more travel obviously..but generally great but then i did have new bike exitment and a very different bike..

    the longer ive had it ive been less sure i am that its any benifit to me...i would say the bike is perfect for about 20% of the terrain of each ride i do the rest of the time im riding a bike that is less suited than the flux, which was perfect for 80% of the terrain of each ride i do

    with tis in mind i have my burner setup more of a peddelly all day bike.
    I have a push tune on the shock which i got done to suit the style i ride most, spoke with the Tech at MOJO Uk and explained and its made a huge difference to the point i ride it in the open setting virtually all the time now as it rides higher up in the stoke but is also more supple and still has the travel available when needed

    i have me my forks soft ish but with volume adjusters in, this means i can have more sag and steeper angle at the front with out the fork bottoming out , blowing through or diving too much...using a dropper post helps this also as you can really get low down when you need to..

    stem is at -6 rise 90mm long with no spacers and a low rise easton havoc think they are 750mm wide...unlike comments above i find the 90 stem spot on and not long at all..but then i base stem length on fit rather than GNAR.


    over all i feel this is a great balance of trail / xc on the burner with the available travel should i need it .... fits the type of riding i do more of the time..maybe still not as well as the flux did tho..

    hope that helps
    Last edited by CragRat; 06-27-2016 at 09:13 AM.

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: CragRat's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2005
    Posts
    219
    oh large burner im dead on 6ft..

  12. #12
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    12
    Here is the geometry for my old bike if it helps in setting up my new one.

    Standover 31.88 in
    top tube 25.47 in
    cockpit length 28.60 in
    stem 105 mm
    crank length 175 mm
    head tube lenght 145 mm
    head angle 71 11/32 in
    seattube angle 72 27/32 in
    chainstay length 412 mm
    bb height 293.24 mm
    bb drop 39.76 mm
    wheelbase 1107.9 in
    center to top 21.07 in

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    12
    Okay, I went out again to day and I'm getting more used to it now, thanks for the encouragement fellas.

  14. #14
    mtbr member
    Reputation: polarflux's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Posts
    164
    Sounds like a great road bike.

  15. #15
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2004
    Posts
    2,610
    Who did you buy it from that did not make sure the sag was set correctly? Setting sag requires you and your pack, don't sound like they set you up on bike. As has been said, get a pump and do it yourself. With YouTube and MTBR riders you can do it yourself.

    Use a plumb line and tape measure to set your current seat height, fore / aft to your old bike location. Don't mess with new unless you were having problems with old. Everything starts here.

    put a 70 stem on, but the Burner does not have a crazy long TT, so no need to go really short. 740 bar is not too wide, get used to it.

    Stop steering and start leaning into turns with a good dose of counter steer.

    Sorry to repeat what others here have said, all good info.

  16. #16
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Posts
    12
    Thanks DT for your suggestions.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 13
    Last Post: 04-02-2016, 10:27 AM
  2. Replies: 44
    Last Post: 08-24-2015, 03:50 PM
  3. Frame Geometry Opinion ? geometry attached
    By madpanda in forum 29er Bikes
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 05-08-2015, 10:10 PM
  4. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 10-16-2013, 10:38 AM
  5. specialized epic new geometry vs pre 2009 geometry?
    By mountainclimb in forum Shocks and Suspension
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 08-24-2013, 03:13 PM

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2019 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.