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  1. #1
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    MX Tune feedback?

    I have been looking for feedback from someone who has time on the PUSH MX Tune upgrade. I'm debating between a Chubie and MX Tune Fox but haven't been able to read much about the MX. I know what to expect with the Avy as I have a DHS and have owned a Chubie but I have my eyes on a cheap Fox shock that can be upgraded. From a cost standpoint there would be considerable savings so I'm curious if the performance would be similiar.
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  2. #2
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    The avalanche shocks have more oil volume and a bigger piston for more flow, but the performance has got to be pretty darn similer, probably not discernable for most people. The only way there could be a difference assuming similer setups in terms of shim stack and other parts is on extremely rough fast downhills where maybe the DHX couldn't dissipate enough heat, but that is not really a big problem with the DHX in the first place, so I doubt it would cause any noticable difference for 99.999% of riding. Avalanche also makes the bladder-style DHS shocks without an internal floating piston which could offer a bit smoother travel, but my main avalanche is a Chubbie with the internal floating piston (same general idea as the MX design).

    If you can save money by going the Push MX route, that's what I'd do, and I have an avalanche. If I was in the market for a new shock and didn't have access to a cheap fox chassi, I'd get the avalanche.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  3. #3
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    Thanks for the feedback. I am a bit under the gun for a decision as PUSH will not be making any more MX tune kits than what they have in stock at least until next spring. They may not make another run of them at all. I have them holding a kit for me.
    Pivot Firebird, Tomac Snyper, KTM 250SX

  4. #4
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    No more kits? Uh-oh. I need to get my DHX-P serviced, but won't drop the dough without the upgrade option. Must...contact...now!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by stretch169
    Thanks for the feedback. I am a bit under the gun for a decision as PUSH will not be making any more MX tune kits than what they have in stock at least until next spring. They may not make another run of them at all. I have them holding a kit for me.
    If you have a kit reserved, get it, quick! I have thier MX Shock on my DW Spot & I could not be happier. It turns the bike into a mini DH bike on the descents & improves the technical climbing (believe it or not) abilities. I come from a DH racing background & ride my bikes pretty much in the same type of environment as most DH courses (here in CO). The bike, especially with the MX shock, has never held me back. It actually feels somewhat bottomless & feels like way more than the 5.5" of travel it get's.

    Trust me, you will be stoked as hell to have it.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by inkpad
    If you have a kit reserved, get it, quick! I have thier MX Shock on my DW Spot & I could not be happier. It turns the bike into a mini DH bike on the descents & improves the technical climbing (believe it or not) abilities. I come from a DH racing background & ride my bikes pretty much in the same type of environment as most DH courses (here in CO). The bike, especially with the MX shock, has never held me back. It actually feels somewhat bottomless & feels like way more than the 5.5" of travel it get's.

    Trust me, you will be stoked as hell to have it.
    +1 to what inpad said.

    All I can say is the MX Tune does such a good job that I don't even think of the rear suspension during my ride. Rear end just works/tracks as it should without any fuss. Excellent work from Push. Best shock I've had on my 6Pack to date (had a CCDB, Avy Chubbie, pushed DHX Race System, pushed RP3 on it).
    Last edited by SCUBAPRO; 09-24-2009 at 11:38 AM.
    "The best you've ridden is the best you know" - Paul Thede, Race Tech

  7. #7
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    My buddy just got his MX Tune back. Said it made his Highline a completely different bike. For the last year he has been struggling with the set-up of the DHX-C and has been less than pleased with the results. MX Tune does everything better. Take hits, eats up braking bumps, and even pedals better. Makes me want to get one for my Enduro.

  8. #8
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    OT here....but can anyone offer some info about the difference in performance and function of a P-DHXc vs a MX-DHXc? I've got about two years on my P-DHXc factory tune and it is still going strong, but wondering how the ride characteristics are different between the two on my 06' RFX? I am about 220lbs ride weight and use the RFX for aggro trail to lite FR/DH and am one of those rare breads who actually uses the pro-pedal on anything with sustained climbing with 13 clicks for long, trail climbing, 14 clicks for long fireroad or road climbing and 0 clicks (off) for just about everything else. With the MX tune, do you have to have a flathead screwdriver to firm up the compression for the climbs or is it set and forget for both going up and down? I really wish I had a P-Marz Roco TST shock for on the fly compression dampening/firming for the climbs. It gets annoying to have to wind the pro-pedal up and down all the time.

    Thanks,

    JG
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    The avalanche shocks have more oil volume and a bigger piston for more flow, but the performance has got to be pretty darn similer, probably not discernable for most people. The only way there could be a difference assuming similer setups in terms of shim stack and other parts is on extremely rough fast downhills where maybe the DHX couldn't dissipate enough heat, but that is not really a big problem with the DHX in the first place, so I doubt it would cause any noticable difference for 99.999% of riding. Avalanche also makes the bladder-style DHS shocks without an internal floating piston which could offer a bit smoother travel, but my main avalanche is a Chubbie with the internal floating piston (same general idea as the MX design).

    If you can save money by going the Push MX route, that's what I'd do, and I have an avalanche. If I was in the market for a new shock and didn't have access to a cheap fox chassi, I'd get the avalanche.
    This is good info for an imbecile like me but have you actually ridden a push mx tuned shock ? and if so can you describe the riding characteristics between a chubie and an mx tuned shock?

  10. #10
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    I've never ridden a chubie but have an mx on my dw spot, I have ridden a regular DHX and a pushed one. The mx is near perfect. You can use all the adjectives you want but it works very well, plush, bottomless, complient, etc... I'd get it for sure, besides the spot my best money spent this year. Since they're running out I'm gonna call tomorrow and see if they can do the DHX for my HL too.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by pjlama
    I've never ridden a chubie but have an mx on my dw spot, I have ridden a regular DHX and a pushed one. The mx is near perfect. You can use all the adjectives you want but it works very well, plush, bottomless, complient, etc... I'd get it for sure, besides the spot my best money spent this year. Since they're running out I'm gonna call tomorrow and see if they can do the DHX for my HL too.
    Thanks, good info!

    Do you adjust either the high or low speed compression setting on the MX shock during the ride for ideal climbing and descending feel or is it set and forget? My rides tend to be long +2k fireroad and doubletrack climbs to aggro trail/lite DH descents so I use the propedal a lot for this to get my 36lb bike and +220lb tail up the hill, how does the MX compare for on the ride adjustablity, if you know?
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  12. #12
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    I rarely make adjustments, like never. The MX and DDub are like peanut butter and chocolate, perfect. I can climb and descend with the same settings. Not having to think about pp or other bs is liberating.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by pjlama
    I rarely make adjustments, like never. The MX and DDub a like peanut butter and chocolate, perfect. I can climb and descend with the same settings. Not having to think about pp or other bs is liberating.
    Cool. I may just hold out for an MX tune if I am ever able to get a DW RFX to replace the old steed? Sounds like the MX tune compliments the DW Turners pretty well. If it will transform the suspension feel of my older RFX, I may just bone up for it, especially since I will probably be on that bike for another year at least. Hopefully a DW in 011' if I got the coin lying around
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgusta
    Thanks, good info!

    Do you adjust either the high or low speed compression setting on the MX shock during the ride for ideal climbing and descending feel or is it set and forget? My rides tend to be long +2k fireroad and doubletrack climbs to aggro trail/lite DH descents so I use the propedal a lot for this to get my 36lb bike and +220lb tail up the hill, how does the MX compare for on the ride adjustablity, if you know?
    I have the exact same high/low compression circut, and no, I don't find myself adjusting it for the rides. It does so well all around that I feel it's not really necessary. If the adjustments weren't really seperate or weren't real high/low speed adjustments, then yes I'd adjust more for the ride.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgusta
    Thanks, good info!

    Do you adjust either the high or low speed compression setting on the MX shock during the ride for ideal climbing and descending feel or is it set and forget? My rides tend to be long +2k fireroad and doubletrack climbs to aggro trail/lite DH descents so I use the propedal a lot for this to get my 36lb bike and +220lb tail up the hill, how does the MX compare for on the ride adjustablity, if you know?
    You just described all my rides perfectly; 2,000' fireroad / singletrack climbs, followed by fast, rocky & technical singletrack. I weight about 210 w/ gear & I never have to mess with the MX on my DW Spot, ever. It climbs amazing & descends even better, without fiddling with knobs & adjustments, which I do not like to have to do to make my bikes ride properly.

    BTW, if you are waiting for the new RFX to to replace your old one, IMO, the DW Spot out performs my old, dare I say it, 08 RFX So the new Spot is not a bad option. Mine is built with fast, technical riding in mind & weighs 32lbs.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    I have the exact same high/low compression circut, and no, I don't find myself adjusting it for the rides. It does so well all around that I feel it's not really necessary. If the adjustments weren't really seperate or weren't real high/low speed adjustments, then yes I'd adjust more for the ride.
    Thanks Jayem!

    Are you running the Avy on the Pack or HL? and could you compare a P-DHXc to an Avy with high/low circuit? If it is night and day transformation between the two, I might be able to rationalize the upgrade, but I don't want to waste it, especially if I end up getting a DW-RFX in the future which I would want to do the MX upgrade as well and will have no need for my older, shock revised RFX. Can't splurge on both, so will more than likely be one or the other for me.

    Thanks again,

    Jon
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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgusta
    Thanks, good info!

    Do you adjust either the high or low speed compression setting on the MX shock during the ride for ideal climbing and descending feel or is it set and forget? My rides tend to be long +2k fireroad and doubletrack climbs to aggro trail/lite DH descents so I use the propedal a lot for this to get my 36lb bike and +220lb tail up the hill, how does the MX compare for on the ride adjustablity, if you know?
    I have one on a 08' Spot. I adjust the LS compression for longer climbs (over 30 minutes) on dirt roads. No need to mess with HS. Don't mess with it for tech climbs. Don't mess with it for normal trail riding where the climb is only 5 to 15 minutes long. Adjusting LS is as simple as keeping a quarter in your front pocket and takes all of 15 seconds. Its worth it to me.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil_S
    I have one on a 08' Spot. I adjust the LS compression for longer climbs (over 30 minutes) on dirt roads. No need to mess with HS. Don't mess with it for tech climbs. Don't mess with it for normal trail riding where the climb is only 5 to 15 minutes long. Adjusting LS is as simple as keeping a quarter in your front pocket and takes all of 15 seconds. Its worth it to me.
    Realize that to make it work more like a "platform" (if that is what you wish) you need to turn the high speed up a little too (increase the damping). Just increasing low-speed can make it transition easier to the high-speed, and while the low and high speed is independantly adjustable, you have to turn both adjusters to get the desired amount of low and high as well as the threshold at which it changes. By just increasing low speed you'll mostly just increase the threshold, which could be what you want, but if you really want more low-speed and want it firmer, you might want to adjust both.

    I do think it's dumb that companies like Avalanche and CC can't machine some sort of knobs that could be turned by hand. You are right, it is worth it (to have and ride these shocks), but it's still dumb.
    Last edited by Jayem; 09-23-2009 at 02:02 PM.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgusta
    Thanks Jayem!

    Are you running the Avy on the Pack or HL? and could you compare a P-DHXc to an Avy with high/low circuit? If it is night and day transformation between the two, I might be able to rationalize the upgrade, but I don't want to waste it, especially if I end up getting a DW-RFX in the future which I would want to do the MX upgrade as well and will have no need for my older, shock revised RFX. Can't splurge on both, so will more than likely be one or the other for me.

    Thanks again,

    Jon
    It's an RFX, but it used to be a 6 pack. It might be the only horst-link RFX I have an avalanche DHS for my highline, but it needs to be revalved/rebuilt.

    I've ridden pushed stuff, but not the push MX. The Push MX is going to be VERY close to something like my Avy chubbie due to the same internal features (high flow piston, shim stack, high-low compression circut, IFP, etc). I highly recommend to upgrade your Fox to the Push MX, and if you don't have a fox, buy an Avalanche. They are going to be so close that I doubt any rider could discern the difference between the two, any difference would be more likely a result of different adjustments and factory settings.

    And while the Push stuff was good, the Avalanche with the high/low circut (same as MX) is much better. It's nice to be able to get that threshold just dialed in. The rebound also has high and low speed features, but the high-speed is set at the factory. If a normal Push upgrade is $200, the MX upgrade is worth the additional $100, although with avalanche shocks the upgrade is only $50, due to not needing a new shock-bridge to be machined for the shock. Again, the purchase price would be the deciding factor. I guess the best way to put it is that the high/low circut and adjustability is better and I can feel the difference. Does it mean it's 200% better? No. On the other hand in some crazy rock-gardens at high speed it *can* be, otherwise overall it's only going to be a number much less IMO, but still discernable. The amount of control with this circut/adjustability is the main factor for me. No more wobbly bike chassi while the rear end adapts to the bumps/trail grade. The bike stays very stable with these circuts and doesn't wallow off the back end of bumps/steps or G-outs. Comparing to a standard DHX, I had to set that thing up very "bouncy" to get it to react well at high-speed. Any more boost pressure or propedal and it would start to spike. The regular Push upgrade addresses this pretty well, but I think the high/low compression circuts really push it (pun!) to the next level in terms of control and stability.

    These shocks feel very over-damped when you are just playing around with the bike (like my Curnut did), yet they open up just fine and suck up stuff amazingly at speed (unlike my Curnut). The rebound especially feels over-damped, but you have to realize it's only low-speed rebound. You end up running higher damping all around on these shocks because you can get away with it without turning them into jack-hammers.

    I do ride the RFX more than my other bikes, so if there's any one bike that I'd like to have that shock on, it's the RFX.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  20. #20
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    thx Jayem for the summary.

    FYI I just got off the phone w/ Push -- they have just 6 avy / MX assemblies left that aren't already accounted for by pre-orders, so act now if you want to get one of those and avoid waiting months.

    I decided to go ahead w/ the MX tune today.
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  21. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by frorider

    FYI I just got off the phone w/ Push -- they have just 6 avy / MX assemblies left that aren't already accounted for by pre-orders,
    Probably thanks to MTBR!
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

    You're turning black metallic.

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by frorider
    FYI I just got off the phone w/ Push -- they have just 6 avy / MX assemblies left that aren't already accounted for by pre-orders, so act now if you want to get one of those and avoid waiting months.
    They had 20 yesterday when I spoke with them!
    Pivot Firebird, Tomac Snyper, KTM 250SX

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    Realize that to make it work more like a "platform" (if that is what you wish) you need to turn the high speed up a little too (increase the damping). Just increasing low-speed can make it transition easier to the high-speed, and while the low and high speed is independantly adjustable, you have to turn both adjusters to get the desired amount of low and high as well as the threshold at which it changes. By just increasing low speed you'll mostly just increase the threshold, which could be what you want, but if you really want more low-speed and want it firmer, you might want to adjust both.

    I do think it's dumb that companies like Avalanche and CC can't machine some sort of knobs that could be turned by hand. You are right, it is worth it (to have and ride these shocks), but it's still dumb.

    I think I understand what your saying. And I think if you run the HS on the light side (full out or close to it) that is a much bigger issue. But with how I run my HS, adjusting LS is all I need to do to get good enough seated petaling efficiency. With my current set up with the LS set up for dirt rd climbing (LS close to full in and HS set at 1.5 from full out), I would get some bob with standing climbing, but then I don't stand for 1 hour climbs on dirt rds. I think this is a good thing for when you forget to readjust LS back to where you like it, your suspension still works reasonablly well on the downhill. Also, I found out that the std set up with the Avy HS compression preload spring does not even make contact with the adjuster untill you screw it in about a turn. I think thats why they don't recommend runing it with less than 1 turn of HS. I had Craig set mine up to make use of the useable range of the adjustment, so that contact is made (or closer to contact) with the HS spring when its in the full soft or full out position (or lightest preload on the HS compression spring). I choose that as I am runing it on a Spot with less travel to work with and thought I might not be able to get away with really light HS valving. Anyway, having to do the LS only makes remembering what to set it back to easy once I get to the top of the hill.

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