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  1. #1
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    Reputation: SmallAirAndy's Avatar
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    Juicy 7 Pad Replacement Tips (xpost)

    Put this in Brake Time forum, but I usually have better luck with the Homers, so here goes.

    Anyone have any tips out there for Juicy 7 pad replacement? I followed the steps included in Avid's instructions that came with the new pads, but I can't seem to get proper rotor clearance. The rotor barely fits between the pads, let alone spins freely. I've pushed the pistons back with a box wrench (after first using a flat head screwdriver against the old pads, per Avid's recommendation), but they appear to slowly return to their original position, so that by the time I get my rear wheel back on, the pads are too close together.

    Any tips out there? Am I missing something?

    As always, thanks in advance.
    Bend, Oregon. Proof you don't have to die to get to heaven.

  2. #2
    Lay off the Levers
    Reputation: Bikezilla's Avatar
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    I had a similar problem with my Formula T1s.
    Question: Did you by chance add oil to the resivoirs while the worn pads were still in use?

    I got through the day by using (1) old pad + (1)new pad in each caliper. That is a temporary solution though. You may have to bleed a little out of your calipers or resivoirs to push the calipers back in.
    Faster is better, even when it's not.

  3. #3
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    works for me

    Ive had my juicy sevens for about 3 1/2 years. I always had the same problem when fitting new pads with the wheel barely rotating due to the lack of clearance between pad and rotor.

    In the end I found that by letting a small amount of fluid out of the bleed nipple by the brake caliper this allowed me to push the pistons back far enough to gain clearance from the rotors. I carried this out a year ago and haven't had any problems with my brakes...........since not sure if this is the correct thing to do but has worked for me

    TE

  4. #4
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    Thanks BZ and TE!

    Now that I'm thinking about it, bleeding a little out of the line should open up a bit of room. I'll give that a go tonight.
    Bend, Oregon. Proof you don't have to die to get to heaven.

  5. #5
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    Reputation: robertj's Avatar
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    I just posted this in Brake Time as well:

    Try turning both (L/R) pad contact adjusters all the way "in" before pushing the pistons back using the flat head screwdriver against your old pads.

    This always does the trick for me, and is especially necessary with the thick Galfer pads I've used with the Juicy brakes (J7 and Carbon).

  6. #6
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    Reputation: ignazjr's Avatar
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    Unless you've bled them with halfworn pads, you shouldn't have to burp any oil out. Make sure the dial is all the way "in" ie loosest feel at the lever.

    It sounds like you've got the pads in fine, though. When you've pushed the pistons in all the way and you've got the pads in, is there good clearance between pad and rotor before you pump the brake?

    If that's the case, it sounds like you may have stuck pistons. If so, take the pads out, pump the pistons in just a bit (careful not to pop them out) and saturate the pistons with DOT fluid or White Lightning. Push the pads back into the caliper and repeat the process a few times. Make sure to use an air gun or some other method to make sure there's no more cleaner or oil remaining in the caliper before you put the pads back in. If you had stuck or gunked up pistons, that should do the trick.
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  7. #7
    SMR
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    Do what robertj says, if you messed with the pad contact dial you will need to turn it all the way in for the pistons to back out enought to get the new pads in. Easiest thing to try first.

  8. #8
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    Reputation: SmallAirAndy's Avatar
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    A combination of fiddling with the pad adjustment dial on the lever and burping a little fluid did the trick. There is still a little pad rub on the rear, but at least the wheel turns now. A little more tweaking and I should be able to eliminate the rubbing altogether.

    Thanks for the suggestions. I owe you all a beer.
    Bend, Oregon. Proof you don't have to die to get to heaven.

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