Highline w/ Totem Coil At Whistler- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Highline w/ Totem Coil At Whistler

    Have any of you guys ridden your Highline with a Totem Coil at Whistler? I'm just wondering how they perform on the upper mountain or if most people are still using dual crown forks up there. 180mm should be sufficient but the dual crowns at 203mm definitely inspire confidence. Anyway, thanks.

  2. #2
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    I just got back from Whistler, though I run a fork that is much better than the Totem, a 66RC3

    The bike worked flawlessly, I see no need for a dual crown.
    Employed by Pivot Cycles - www.pivotcycles.com

  3. #3
    FM
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    That will be a great set-up.
    There are some trails where a dual crown might be better, but others where a single-crown has advantages.
    I've had 170 & 180mm 66's on my highline, as well as a 203mm 888. The 180mm 66 is my fave, just because it's the most versatile. The 888 was too slack for the slow tech stuff IMHO.

    So... ride whatever you got and have fun!

  4. #4
    It's carbon dontcha know.
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    I was on my 180mm 66 RC2 last year with no problems, didn't make it there this year.

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    Quote Originally Posted by tiSS'er
    I just got back from Whistler, though I run a fork that is much better than the Totem, a 66RC3

    The bike worked flawlessly, I see no need for a dual crown.
    I second that!

    I have yet to ever see a single Totem last a weekend on Garbonzo when there is any rain. Suckers get stuffed in no time, unless you pack the seals with tons of grease every time. Same goes for all the fox forks I've seen up there too. Buddy's brand new 40 was stuffed and puking oil in two days of being there. Muddy as hell.

    The seals on Marzocchi forks are by no question, much much better than all of the competition.

    The Totem is a good fork and is lighter than the 66rc3, but that comes at a price of being a lot more maintenance. I personally like only having to lube my fork twice a year.

  6. #6
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    fun set up for sure, but YoPawn is correct.

    Make sure your fork is freshly serviced, how old is your fork, how many days you riding the park? Consider new seals (enduro), bring tools and oil, and a heavier spring. Be prepared to drop the lowers to clean the seals if things start getting ugly. I found that frequent bottoming pushes lots of oil out the seals, that's why I recommend the extra spring because it's likely the suspension set up that works at home isn't optimal for the bike park. Keep the oil fresh and filled, the performance drops rapidly with oil loss.

    Last year I was switching back and forth with a Highline/Totem and DHR/Boxxer, on the garbo tech I would ride differently on the highline, taking different lines, maneuvering/flicking, etc. After plowing through on the DHR I thought the HL would be less desirable but actually it was a blast. The one trail that the HL didn't like was Bear Cub.

    I have also ridden the HL with the boxxer (08) and did not find it too slack at all, and the boxxer blows doors on the Totem when it's taking hits. The totem is still fine, just different, for garbo tech the boxxer "helps" but the totem in no way limits the fun!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by YoPawn
    I have yet to ever see a single Totem last a weekend on Garbonzo when there is any rain. Suckers get stuffed in no time, unless you pack the seals with tons of grease every time.

    The Totem is a good fork and is lighter than the 66rc3, but that comes at a price of being a lot more maintenance. I personally like only having to lube my fork twice a year.
    Also, I have read that Totem's are prone to spontaneously catching on fire just after the crux move on Goats Gully.
    Extreme stationary biker.

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    Quote Originally Posted by airwreck
    The one trail that the HL didn't like was Bear Cub.
    I don't think there is any bike that likes that trail.

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    Quote Originally Posted by geolover
    Also, I have read that Totem's are prone to spontaneously catching on fire just after the crux move on Goats Gully.
    Yes, but fortunately the oil puts the fire out pretty quick.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by YoPawn
    I don't think there is any bike that likes that trail.

    Could it kill Whistler to make that run a little more enjoyable. I mean, fire roads full of chundery rock are fun and all...
    The DHR makes Bear Cub considerably more bearable.

    The Blue Velvet extension should help the situation, if goats gully could hook up to in deep, that would be sweet, I'm sure there are people assessing that situation thoroughly.

  11. #11
    mr. wonderful
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    My Totem coil was great over the 6 days last week at Whistler and the Shore. It was in the 90s with no rain so I didn't have to deal with mud. I've been running the Totem for about a year and I love it; a big improvement over the RC2X I replaced. I change the oil through the speed lube ports and it just keeps on ticking. Lucky I guess, but I don't have to deal with wet conditions in Arizona though.

    I think the tight trails on upper mountain is where a single crown works great.

    Was there a crux move on Goat's Gully? I don't remember anything substantially harder (that I would call a crux anyway) than anything else.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtbag
    Was there a crux move on Goat's Gully? I don't remember anything substantially harder (that I would call a crux anyway) than anything else.
    maybe the racer braid.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by dirtbag
    Was there a crux move on Goat's Gully? I don't remember anything substantially harder (that I would call a crux anyway) than anything else.
    Most agree that there's a tight right and rocky switchback (before the little bridge) that is the crux move on GG. Like a lot of sections similar to that, speed/momentum is rewarded with better flow. The slower you go, the more herky-jerky it is. There's actually a "racer line" straight down that face, but comes with a big penalty for crashing.

    Having ridden the park for the past 4 (or 5?) seasons with a singlecrown, it's nice having a dual crown on my bike again. I've not found it limiting in turning radius and the extra squish has been fun!

    EB

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    Quote Originally Posted by ebxtreme
    Most agree that there's a tight right and rocky switchback (before the little bridge) that is the crux move on GG. Like a lot of sections similar to that, speed/momentum is rewarded with better flow. The slower you go, the more herky-jerky it is.
    EB
    That is the move of which I speak. Probably not the same with the dry weather we have had lately. I have never ridden that move when it was completely dry.
    Extreme stationary biker.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by geolover
    That is the move of which I speak. Probably not the same with the dry weather we have had lately. I have never ridden that move when it was completely dry.
    It's on the verge of easy right now....you'd be very surprised.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by geolover
    That is the move of which I speak. Probably not the same with the dry weather we have had lately. I have never ridden that move when it was completely dry.
    Piece of cake when it is dry. Check out my third video. Both dirtbag and I hit it 1st time...though we are very well trained on slow steep switchbacks. I wouldn't even call that a "real" switchback
    Employed by Pivot Cycles - www.pivotcycles.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by ebxtreme
    It's on the verge of easy right now....you'd be very surprised.
    I'm sure I could find a way to fvck it up.
    Extreme stationary biker.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by tiSS'er
    Piece of cake when it is dry. Check out my third video. Both dirtbag and I hit it 1st time...though we are very well trained on slow steep switchbacks. I wouldn't even call that a "real" switchback
    Well done, indeed. Yeah, that trail is entirely different with a day or three of rain. It's not so much that one "crux" move as much as it's hard to get much flow due to the off camber roots, so the setup into it can be a bit of a clusterphock.

    Rode GG on Sunday for the first time in a while and it was really good.

    EB

  19. #19
    mr. wonderful
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    Quote Originally Posted by ebxtreme
    Well done, indeed. Yeah, that trail is entirely different with a day or three of rain. It's not so much that one "crux" move as much as it's hard to get much flow due to the off camber roots, so the setup into it can be a bit of a clusterphock.

    Rode GG on Sunday for the first time in a while and it was really good.

    EB
    Yeah, I can only imagine it covered in snot It was very dry all week we were there and the DHFs were sticking like glue. GG is a great trail though, we loved it. More than anything else on the hill, it felt like home But as much as we loved it, and because it felt like home, we only rode it once because we were totally smitten with all the other great stuff, A-L and DM in particular.

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