Gravity Dropper question..- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Gravity Dropper question..

    Although I have heard great things on MTBR about the wonders of the GD and even myself think the concept sounds great, I was not about to toss $250.00 at an item site unseen.

    While cruising around Santa Cruz this afternoon I happen into Family Cycles, low and behold they have two GD in stock. So I get my chance to look the item over and it looks to be well made and possibly worth the money. Take a couple minutes manually compressing and rereleasing the mechanism to see how smooth it operates. Seems like it should function perfectly mounted to a bike with the lever mounted in an easy to get to location.

    At this point I ask the salesrep what is the drop of the model they stock, looked to be the three inch from visual inspection, but none of the employees was certain what it was shipped as. So I ask for a tape measure and proceed to measure the post extended and contracted and come up with a difference of 2 5/8". Odd, knew they had 2", 3" and 4" with multiple stop locations and no one in the shop had an answer for the discrepancy of 3/8". Since I was hoping for at a minimum of 3" and more looking for the four inch I was a bit bummed and did not buy the GD.

    Curious what others with the 3" GD are getting in total height drop? Or anyone with a 4" model what total drop do you get? Guess it is time to just go to the factory and order direct as there does not seem to be one in stock over 2 5/8" in my area..


    KB

  2. #2
    No, that's not phonetic
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    I have watched eBay and generally kept an eye open and have always pick them up for way under retail. If you don't want a (slightly) used one, Larry at Mountain High sells them for a decent price.

    I don't have mine handy to measure (I own 5 of them now )
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by tscheezy
    I have watched eBay and generally kept an eye open and have always pick them up for way under retail. If you don't want a (slightly) used one, Larry at Mountain High sells them for a decent price.

    I don't have mine handy to measure (I own 5 of them now )

    LOL Tscheezy!

    Five of those posts is almost a custom Ti frame, that is a pretty ringing endorsement.

    I guess at this point I am trying to determine if the 3" model everyone else has is actually a 2 5/8" drop or if that was just a bad tape measure or inproperly drilled post. Also what the 4" drop post is for others. Once I get that I can order from Larry, he was the ONLY one to quote a price below the $249.00 that I spoke to on the GD.


    KB

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fasttrak
    I guess at this point I am trying to determine if the 3" model everyone else has is actually a 2 5/8" drop or if that was just a bad tape measure or inproperly drilled post.

    Good luck getting someone who has spent $250 on a seatpost to admit it comes up short if that's the case.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  5. #5
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    Well, I haven't measured mine, but I was lucky enough to call GD, Wayne was interested in testing out the 4", 2" drop post. It has been the most useful settings I can imagine. Having the 2" drop is perfect for the semi descents with some flat pedaling sections to keep speed, and then the full 4" drop is perfect for anything thatI have to think about. He may still make it if you ask nicely. FWIW!

  6. #6
    No, that's not phonetic
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    The bottom line is, who really gives a sh!t if it gets exactly X inches? The take-home message is that the (alleged) 3" model is good for trailbike applications where you will plop your butt down and still pedal some sections with the saddle lowered, and the (alleged) 4" model is good for bikes doing bigger drops where you really want the saddle out of the way, but don't plan on pedaling with the seat down much.

    Aappling makes a good point that multiple height posts give you the best of both worlds. Jm makes no point other than that he is still bitter from childhood.
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  7. #7
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    Sorry jayem.... I'll admit it. I knew it when I bought it

    I have 1 GD and am about to order a second.

    I remember Wayne telling me that the 3" drop is a bit less..... somewhere around 2.75", so you are correct. I have a 4" drop insert so that I can change mine to a 4" drop (not sure if it's 4" or a bit less).

    Anyway... Do yourself a favor and get one. You won't find any of mine on Ebay anytime soon

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Shorts
    I remember Wayne telling me that the 3" drop is a bit less..... somewhere around 2.75", so you are correct.
    Thanks, basicly what I wanted to hear as it pretty much cements the need for a 4" model. Was sold on the quality and functionality of the unit while testing it out in the store.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tscheezy
    The bottom line is, who really gives a sh!t if it gets exactly X inches?
    Well, much easier to make a purchasing decision when I have facts opposed to incorrect information. I had no idea, nor did the store I was shopping at, what model they had for sale. So I figured it best to find out the real measurements so I could buy once and be happy I got what I bargained for.



    KB

  9. #9
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    I have the 4" drop and its more like 3 3/4". Best seatpost ever made!

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by kauia
    I have the 4" drop and its more like 3 3/4". Best seatpost ever made!
    With over a year of use I never even thought about the measuring the actual drop until now. Mine measures in at 3.75 inches, too. The saddle gets in the way every now and then, but its not the sort of thing that causes a crash.

    EDIT: I have the DescenderPost so I didn't pay $250. That makes it easy for me to admit it shortcomings.


  11. #11
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    I rode in Les Gets, Morzine and Samoens for the last week. I badly need a Gravity Dropper for my next trip to the Alps... We did more AM then DH and it was a constant stopping, adjusting seat height or just riding standing with a too low saddle...
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    /Tobbe - In Mud We Thrust / Carpe Diem

  12. #12
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    I was there last week and yes they are great

    Stay off the brakes

  13. #13
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    Hi,

    Anyone know the best place to source one in the UK. Only name I've got is some distributor in Essex

    Friend has a maverick speedball which is pretty good but they don't do a 27.2 as yet unless anyone's heard otherwise?

    Cheers

  14. #14
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    That's alan at riverside cycles, the ventana importer isn't it? The speedball's not available in 27.2mm IIRC.

  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prof
    I was there last week and yes they are great
    Cool, they made you wash your bike before taking that lift too? From the top of that lift you could ride towards Samoens, climb a little at the lake and then take trail #50 down to Samoens. That was the best trail of the week.
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    /Tobbe - In Mud We Thrust / Carpe Diem

  16. #16
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    Larry at mtn high cyclery supplied mine

    You can get them from here www.riversidecyclecentre.co.uk as well if you want though. Alan gave me a lecture when he found out where I get mine from though :0 and charged me 10 for a spare plastic collar so I can't say I will ever use him again.

    The TnT yes there was a good bit of mud about, played around here



    and here

    Last edited by Prof; 09-05-2006 at 09:45 AM.
    Stay off the brakes

  17. #17
    not so super...
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    Quote Originally Posted by aappling72
    Well, I haven't measured mine, but I was lucky enough to call GD, Wayne was interested in testing out the 4", 2" drop post. It has been the most useful settings I can imagine. Having the 2" drop is perfect for the semi descents with some flat pedaling sections to keep speed, and then the full 4" drop is perfect for anything thatI have to think about. He may still make it if you ask nicely. FWIW!
    I spoke to Wayne at GD a few weeks ago and he is not willing to make the 4"/2" drop post for anyone at/over 180lbs. Even then he didn't seems to enthused about it.
    Nothing to see here.

  18. #18
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    I added a detent position for a 2.5 inch drop on my 4 inch [hey Jayem, it's really 3 and 3/4 inches] gravity dropper. I use the 2.5 position more than the 4, FWIW. I haven't snapped mine in half yet, being a svelte 185 pounds and a smoooooooooth rider.
    ****

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prof
    Land here

    Rode that twice, super fun!
    Regards,
    /Tobbe - In Mud We Thrust / Carpe Diem

  20. #20
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    I am in the market for a GD post for my new RFX. I am not sure if I want the Descender or the handlebar dropper. I ride the RFX mainly for all-mt/trail purposes with occasional FR. I like the price and weight savings of the Descender, but an instant drop via a lever on the bars sounds pretty cool too.

    Any recs for either of the two models for the applications mentioned?

    Thanks,

    Jon.

  21. #21
    mtbr member
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    The GD is so handy in the remote version for me I cannot recommend anything else, a really useful tool.
    Stay off the brakes

  22. #22
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    <lurker coming out of hiding>
    The AMP (All Mountain Post) is in production and should be available soon
    http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.ph...light=gotballs

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgusta
    I am in the market for a GD post for my new RFX. I am not sure if I want the Descender or the handlebar dropper. I ride the RFX mainly for all-mt/trail purposes with occasional FR. I like the price and weight savings of the Descender, but an instant drop via a lever on the bars sounds pretty cool too.

    Any recs for either of the two models for the applications mentioned?

    Thanks,

    Jon.
    I think the terrain you ride frequently will decide for you. Here in SoCal I tend to ride trails with lots of climbing followed by steep descents so the DescenderPost works great. I hate handlebar clutter and I like the simplicity of the knob design.

    However, I've been to Utah (Moab) and Colorado (Fruita, Salida) a couple of times this year and found the more roller-coaster type terrain (where I rode at least) made the GravityDropper really appealing, especially the one with multiple detents (like at 1 inch and 4 inches). There were lots of sections with short ups and down that we just don't encounter as often here.


  24. #24
    trail fairy
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    I am in the market for a GD post for my new RFX. I am not sure if I want the Descender or the handlebar dropper. I ride the RFX mainly for all-mt/trail purposes with occasional FR. I like the price and weight savings of the Descender, but an instant drop via a lever on the bars sounds pretty cool too.

    Any recs for either of the two models for the applications mentioned?

    Thanks,

    Jon.
    GD remote is the only option, have had both forget the clutter its the best attachment you can have on yr bars period, you will use the GD more and therefore get more benefit, I use my remote version 10 times more on a ride because a I can and safely with both hands in control, don't skimp out you'll be the only one who loses out.

    Enjoy its one of the top 10- products to have on yr bike imo unless youre an XC wippet..
    Just riding a muddy trail. . ..

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  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by trailadvent
    GD remote is the only option, have had both forget the clutter its the best attachment you can have on yr bars period, you will use the GD more and therefore get more benefit, I use my remote version 10 times more on a ride because a I can and safely with both hands in control, don't skimp out you'll be the only one who loses out.

    Enjoy its one of the top 10- products to have on yr bike imo unless youre an XC wippet..
    Thanks for the advice. I am leaning towards the bar mount now especially since we have a lot of river trails up here in the NW that go up/down/up/down..etc and I already am doing the the fork adjustment with one hand before and after a climb with the ETA feature, so a bar mount is just making more and more sense.

    I can't wait, now I just have to find a way to rationalize it to the wife after dropping $3000 on a new RFX bike build when I originally told her it was just going to be $1400 (I ended up getting all new parts except wheelset). Thanks again.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgusta
    I can't wait, now I just have to find a way to rationalize it to the wife after dropping $3000 on a new RFX bike build when I originally told her it was just going to be $1400
    LOL. A couple of years back when I was building up my 'Spot my SO asked how much "the bike" would cost. Taking a gamble I said "the frame" was about $1800 and left it at that. Thankfully there were no follow up questions.

    BTW, given your trails the GravityDropper is prolly the right choice.


  27. #27
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    So does the remote control cable get in the way? How is it routed? and is the lever on the bar at risk for getting munched with a crash? I already had to replace my XT shifters this past year from a crash, a $75 crash and a little concerned about the hbar lever too.

  28. #28
    trail fairy
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    Easy to install, note you can get either right side bar mount or left side mount remote on specific model GDs.

    Routing on a Turner is simple, I just run my cable alongside my disc brake cable and 2 small zip ties they supply nip it down and then I route mine around the headtube to my left hand side mounted beside my disk brake mount.

    Ive had no probs with crashes shes pretty protected, just be careful of the not to over tighten the clamp, a couple of us are geting our our LBS (the good Swiss chesse) to make us a nice alloy clamp to get a little more bling and clamp force on the bar.

    I think GD have strengthened this component

    Go and enjoy you'll wonder why you didn't do this sooner..
    Just riding a muddy trail. . ..

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  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by trailadvent
    Easy to install, note you can get either right side bar mount or left side mount remote on specific model GDs.

    Routing on a Turner is simple, I just run my cable alongside my disc brake cable and 2 small zip ties they supply nip it down and then I route mine around the headtube to my left hand side mounted beside my disk brake mount.

    Ive had no probs with crashes shes pretty protected, just be careful of the not to over tighten the clamp, a couple of us are geting our our LBS (the good Swiss chesse) to make us a nice alloy clamp to get a little more bling and clamp force on the bar.

    I think GD have strengthened this component

    Go and enjoy you'll wonder why you didn't do this sooner..
    Thanks. So you think the there is no comparison between the GD and Descender as far as function and performance goes?

  30. #30
    trail fairy
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    Thanks. So you think the there is no comparison between the GD and Descender as far as function and performance goes?
    youre a hard man to convince numbers alone on this board should do it.

    Decender is better than a standard post for sure but no there is no comparison once youve had both its a no brainer.

    If ya can try one you'll be sold
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  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Prof
    The GD is so handy in the remote version for me I cannot recommend anything else, a really useful tool.
    So what is the general census for what side of the bars to run the remote lever on? The right (RD side) or left (FD side). I am right handed, but I am usually shifting the right shifter (RD) like crazy before, during and after a climb. So does having the remote on the left going to be better?

    Thanks.

  32. #32
    trail fairy
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    Mine just came left handed its, turned out well as I figure now that I use my rear trigger shifter way more than my left so it still lets me brake shift and drop my seat all at once.

    Which is actually a dam lot to do at once in reality as u still unweight the saddle then weight it to drop it still after while it all seems second nature, I can tell ya thats hard to do with a decender post and more than a few times I endo'd trying to pull the knob fast enough with only one hand on the bar at a critical time as usual, haven't had that problem with the remote GD could have been me multi tasking is not my main strength..
    Just riding a muddy trail. . ..

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  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgusta
    So what is the general census for what side of the bars to run the remote lever on? The right (RD side) or left (FD side). I am right handed, but I am usually shifting the right shifter (RD) like crazy before, during and after a climb. So does having the remote on the left going to be better?

    Thanks.
    If you buy a right handed one you can put it on the left and it will mount under the bar and reduce the risk of breaking it in a crash.

  34. #34
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    AA's correct. By purchasing the Right Hand remote and inverting it on the left side, you get a clean install. Works well with the sram x0 shifter pod, fits just right! Also, as mentioned by AA, less potential of breakage upon bailing.
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  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgusta
    So what is the general census for what side of the bars to run the remote lever on? The right (RD side) or left (FD side). I am right handed, but I am usually shifting the right shifter (RD) like crazy before, during and after a climb. So does having the remote on the left going to be better?

    Thanks.

    Appling and Hambone are right and the RHS lever on the left is the way to go, had a few crashes last week (proper cartwheels) and the lever is fine.
    Bike still in box after rtn from France
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    Stay off the brakes

  36. #36
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    So when I order the GD, do I need to specifically ask for a right side lever and mount inverted on the left side? I have the Sram shifters, so should work fine inverted as well.

    Thanks so much for your guys' help.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgusta
    So when I order the GD, do I need to specifically ask for a right side lever and mount inverted on the left side? I have the Sram shifters, so should work fine inverted as well.

    Thanks so much for your guys' help.

    Yes, RH remote lever, and don't forget Larry at Mountain High Cyclery when you order it.
    Stay off the brakes

  38. #38
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    So with a RH remote inverted on the left side how is the lever activated? By pushing the lever down or pulling it up?'

    Thanks.

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgusta
    So with a RH remote inverted on the left side how is the lever activated? By pushing the lever down or pulling it up?'

    Thanks.
    It would still activate by pushing it (forward... just the same as it would be if mounted on the top right side) since you're not only turning it upside down, you're rotating it 180 deg. in the horizontal plane (a double flip so to speak) . Clear as mud?

  40. #40
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    Thanks, do you have an inverted left remote lever mount as well?

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgusta
    Thanks, do you have an inverted left remote lever mount as well?
    No, I haven't. I prefer to use my right thumb. I may try it again, but I don't need to protect it. I have a $400 GPS that will absord all of the impact way before the lever can touch the ground in an endo

    THe r-Hand lever works both ways.... above on the right.... below on the left. I

    If you want to use your right thumb and also want it under the bars.... order a left hand lever.

  42. #42
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    Amazing, this thread has a life of it's own.

    Curious what direction it goes in next


    KB

  43. #43
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    New GD model for 07'

    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Shorts
    No, I haven't. I prefer to use my right thumb. I may try it again, but I don't need to protect it. I have a $400 GPS that will absord all of the impact way before the lever can touch the ground in an endo

    THe r-Hand lever works both ways.... above on the right.... below on the left. I

    If you want to use your right thumb and also want it under the bars.... order a left hand lever.
    I know most of you may want this post to die by now, but I can't help but ask another question, especially since I just talked to the guys at Gravity Dropper today in Montana while on the verge of finally making a purchase.

    So how is the mechanism of having to tap your butt back down on the saddle after initially unweighting and pushing the lever? That movement seems a bit awkward to me. The reason I am asking this is because GD told me today that they are coming out with a new product for 2007, called the "Turbo". It is suppose to be just like the GD, except will raise and drop faster and doesn't require that extra butt tap of the saddle after unweighting. They said the Turbo post will probably go for $275-$300.

    Is it going to be worth it to hold out for this new model and pay the extra "dough" or does the GD work well enough as it is?

    Thanks again.

    J.

  44. #44
    Lay off the Levers
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    I have no idea what the Turbo will do differently or how it will be faster other than eliminating the unweight-tap move.

    I sort of liked the confort of knowing the seat could not be raised or dropped unless you stood up, hit the lever,and sat back down while holding it. It is sort of a fail-safe.

    As time went on and I became more familliar with using the post, I found I really didn't need that extra saftey any more than I needed to be reminded not to use my front brakes sharply. I may get a 2nd unit for my Spot, so the Turbo will probably end up on the RFX.... but not for $100 more than a std GD.
    Faster is better, even when it's not.

  45. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Blue Shorts
    No, I haven't. I prefer to use my right thumb. I may try it again, but I don't need to protect it. I have a $400 GPS that will absord all of the impact way before the lever can touch the ground in an endo

    THe r-Hand lever works both ways.... above on the right.... below on the left. I

    If you want to use your right thumb and also want it under the bars.... order a left hand lever.
    Same here, I like the right side. You ride with your GPS on the bars? woah! I'll see you your $400 GPS crash absorber with my $400 chest armor/digicam. Last week I took a full-on superman at near dh speed and landed on my chest with the camera hanging on the sternum strap. Smashed the LCD and bruised a few side ribs...hard breathing feels like I have a chest cramp. Stupid Tree!!
    Faster is better, even when it's not.

  46. #46
    trail fairy
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    Die thread die

    Turbo ummmmmmmmmmm

    Im with BZ

    later
    Just riding a muddy trail. . ..

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  47. #47
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikezilla
    Same here, I like the right side. You ride with your GPS on the bars? woah! I'll see you your $400 GPS crash absorber with my $400 chest armor/digicam. Last week I took a full-on superman at near dh speed and landed on my chest with the camera hanging on the sternum strap. Smashed the LCD and bruised a few side ribs...hard breathing feels like I have a chest cramp. Stupid Tree!!
    I don't ride with the GPS all the time. When I'm going to jump or ride really hard on familiar trails... I usually skip the GPS.

    Ouch!! Take care of those ribs.

  48. #48
    Lay off the Levers
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    I take my GPS on every ride. I stuff it in the outside net pocket on my CB. I love getting the stats and profile post ride.
    Faster is better, even when it's not.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bikezilla
    I take my GPS on every ride. I stuff it in the outside net pocket on my CB. I love getting the stats and profile post ride.
    I would do that if I didn't have the Polar 720i HR monitor with bike functions. I get all of my trip data, including altitude profile from it. THe Polar is small and light and extremely rugged.

    I only use the GPS for navigation and map creation.

  50. #50
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    Don't you got a bike to be building TA? Let me have my moment of info seeking and beeting a topic up to death.

    Jon.

  51. #51
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    Hmmm...

    Should I post up a good GPS question and see what that one drags in

    Heck, don't die!

    I want to see more pictures of exotic locations I will most likely never have the chance to ride. Plus some good pictures of remote mounts that I had not even thought of before ordering my GD..



    Bikezilla, take care of those ribs, Jack Daniels BBQ sauce works wonders



    KB

  52. #52
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    Need your advise on what Gravity Dropper to get. My friend is currently using a 3 Position GD-Turbo which has 4 / 3 / Full Down Drop (i hope i'm correct) and he told me that there is also a 2 Position GD-Turbo.

    Can you help me which one is better or should I say will be most beneficial model, I plan to put this on my 5-Spot.

    Thanks & Happy New Year HOMERS!!!

  53. #53
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    3-inch drop its the "standard" and IMO enough. The seat gets nice between the legs to "pinch" with them on the DH... I ride a 5 Spot

  54. #54
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    Single drop 3in or 4in GD Turbo is where it's at. IMO the 2 drop is too hard to find the mid position on while riding along, so it is rarely used. 3in is fine for a lot of riding, but if you have steep or really rough terrain the 4in is better.

    Nice work bringing up a 3 year old thread
    Quote Originally Posted by saturnine
    that's the stupidest idea this side of pinkbike.

  55. #55
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    Has anyone ran it without the stupid looking boot on it? I'm planning to get one but hate the boot! I know it serves a purpose but the RASE has a nice neoprene boot and the Jopiln(thought it doesn't fit a Turner) has no boot. I have 3 friends who use a Joplin and haven't had any issues. I was thinking the first thing I'd do is rip the stupid(est) looking boot I've ever seen off. Any thoughts?

  56. #56
    FleshwoundGravityResearch
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    Quote Originally Posted by .Shawn.
    Has anyone ran it without the stupid looking boot on it? I'm planning to get one but hate the boot! I know it serves a purpose but the RASE has a nice neoprene boot and the Jopiln(thought it doesn't fit a Turner) has no boot. I have 3 friends who use a Joplin and haven't had any issues. I was thinking the first thing I'd do is rip the stupid(est) looking boot I've ever seen off. Any thoughts?

    So buy some neoprene and make yourself a neoprene boot.

    IMO There, is no way you should run the GD without the boot or a boot of some kind.

  57. #57
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    I rock the GD with a single 4 inch drop. In the year that I have had it I haven't found myself wanting anything with more options. I am def a fan of set it and forget it components on mountain bikes tho. I can't imagine riding without an adjustable seatpost now tho. It is def worth it!

    Ben

  58. #58
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    The stupid looking boot, despite being a bit silly looking and inspiring questions on group rides like, "Why do you have a suspension post on a full suspension bike?", is actually one of the things that sets the GD above the rest. A GD with the boot can be ridden all season with little or no maintenance since it is well covered and the cable isn't exposed anywhere. Every other post I have used has had vulnerabilities when riding in the muck (which we have had a lot of this year in the SE).
    Quote Originally Posted by saturnine
    that's the stupidest idea this side of pinkbike.

  59. #59
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    Quote Originally Posted by AL29er
    Single drop 3in or 4in GD Turbo is where it's at. IMO the 2 drop is too hard to find the mid position on while riding along, so it is rarely used. 3in is fine for a lot of riding, but if you have steep or really rough terrain the 4in is better.

    Nice work bringing up a 3 year old thread
    I've ben ridding AL29er's post a week or so now and would agree that the 1" is near impossible to find while riding but, I find it very useful for getting on the bike and rolling in difficult situations.

  60. #60
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    I will totally agree that the GD boot is wicked ugly. But I have had zero problems with my post since owning it. And I live in Germany so nasty mud and wet riding conditions are around for the majority of the year. It doesn't look near as slick as the hydraulic versions put out by crank brothers and specialized but give me function over form anyday!

    Ben

    Plus what AL29er said. It is a great ice breaker...

  61. #61
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    Quote Originally Posted by Endomaniac
    I've ben ridding AL29er's post a week or so now and would agree that the 1" is near impossible to find while riding but
    Wow, just sounds wrong when you put it that way
    Quote Originally Posted by saturnine
    that's the stupidest idea this side of pinkbike.

  62. #62
    Appalachian Singletrack'n
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    Quote Originally Posted by AL29er
    Wow, just sounds wrong when you put it that way


  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by EVERYUSERNAMEISTAKEN

    Plus what AL29er said. It is a great ice breaker...
    Thanks guys...funny stuff

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by Endomaniac
    I've ben ridding AL29er's post a week or so now and would agree that the 1" is near impossible to find while riding but, I find it very useful for getting on the bike and rolling in difficult situations.

    I disagree; I can find the 1" setting pretty easily and I use it for the "pedaling" downhills. When I get in the really steep nasties, I am not looking for the 1" setting and it is easy to slam it all the way down.

  65. #65
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    Turbo or Classic?

    Quote Originally Posted by BBW
    3-inch drop its the "standard" and IMO enough. The seat gets nice between the legs to "pinch" with them on the DH... I ride a 5 Spot
    What is the bes type of GD? Is it the Turbo or Classc? I like the attachment of the cable on the Classic. It looks nicer than the Turbo's 90 degree cable. What are the Pros & Cons of each model?

    Thanks again!

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by .Shawn.
    Has anyone ran it without the stupid looking boot on it? I'm planning to get one but hate the boot! I know it serves a purpose but the RASE has a nice neoprene boot and the Jopiln(thought it doesn't fit a Turner) has no boot. I have 3 friends who use a Joplin and haven't had any issues. I was thinking the first thing I'd do is rip the stupid(est) looking boot I've ever seen off. Any thoughts?
    I made a 'boot' out of an old inner tube and ran it for a while while awaiting a new boot to come in. I had to cut out large sections of the rubber to stop the boot getting in the way and preventing suficient room for the seat to stay down. Maybe something thinner than the inner tube would work but I imagine the reason for the look of the factory boot is an intended design to keep it out of the way when compressed.

  67. #67
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    Quote Originally Posted by AL29er
    Single drop 3in or 4in GD Turbo is where it's at. IMO the 2 drop is too hard to find the mid position on while riding along, so it is rarely used. 3in is fine for a lot of riding, but if you have steep or really rough terrain the 4in is better.

    Nice work bringing up a 3 year old thread
    Hi AL29er! How about the 4 Inch Muli Position feature of the GD-Turbo? Do you think its a good choice with that additional 1 inch drop?

    Thanks!


  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by hambone
    AA's correct. By purchasing the Right Hand remote and inverting it on the left side, you get a clean install. Works well with the sram x0 shifter pod, fits just right! Also, as mentioned by AA, less potential of breakage upon bailing.
    This is the way to go on installing that switch.

    Thanks!!!

  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by hambone
    AA's correct. By purchasing the Right Hand remote and inverting it on the left side, you get a clean install. Works well with the sram x0 shifter pod, fits just right! Also, as mentioned by AA, less potential of breakage upon bailing.
    Thats how Weir runs his too. Works much better if you drop the retarded Fder/shifter too.

  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgusta
    So what is the general census for what side of the bars to run the remote lever on? The right (RD side) or left (FD side). I am right handed, but I am usually shifting the right shifter (RD) like crazy before, during and after a climb. So does having the remote on the left going to be better?

    Thanks.
    I have a right hand lever, mounted upside down on the left side of my bars. It sits just above my front shifter lever, and is as easy to operate as shifting gears!!

  71. #71
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    Quote Originally Posted by TNT-Spot
    Hi AL29er! How about the 4 Inch Muli Position feature of the GD-Turbo? Do you think its a good choice with that additional 1 inch drop?

    Thanks!

    I don't care all that much about the mid-position. It isn't fool proof to find. Personally I would go without next time around. I did have a spare inner post to swap out to a single drop, but I have been giving the multi-drop a bit more time. I found that I would just about every time overshoot the 1in position, so then I would be messing with it for 20-50 yards before getting it right. The Command Post and Joplin are far better at getting into the mid-positions, but they have other issues...
    Quote Originally Posted by saturnine
    that's the stupidest idea this side of pinkbike.

  72. #72
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    Ill chime in on this discussion.

    First of all, let me say that if you ride in the kind of terrain that calls for constant seat height adjustments, that is to say if you find yourself constantly stopping to adjust your seat height, then one of these seatposts will transform your riding experience.

    I started out with one of the earlier Joplins, the 3 model. It worked great when it was new and for several months. Then when the weather got wet and the only miles put in are muck and slime, the Joplin became a maintenance nightmare.

    I will say that I prefer the silky smooth operation of a nice, new air/oil seatpost over the mechanical clunk and snap of the mechanical spring unit. However, my experience with the air/oil style was that it wasnt ready for wet riding. The mechanical one, with its big, ugly accordion boot just works and works and works. If you feel so inclined, you can take it apart and grease it, but it isnt really necessary.

    I think if one of the fork companies like Fox or Rockshox ever were to make an air/oil one with seals that work as good as the seals on high-end forks work, they would have a winner on their hands.

    BTW, I have the 2 position 4 GD Turbo that has a 1 drop and the 4 drop. I sometimes find it a little difficult to find that 1 drop. It rarely gets used.
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  73. #73
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    Are there any shortcomings going with a multiposition GD rather than a single drop GD even if the 1" position is hard to find or just useless as some are saying? It seems to me that having a 1" drop and not using (or needing) it is better anyway than needing it and not having this option.

  74. #74
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smith
    Are there any shortcomings going with a multiposition GD rather than a single drop GD even if the 1" position is hard to find or just useless as some are saying? It seems to me that having a 1" drop and not using (or needing) it is better anyway than needing it and not having this option.
    Only real disadvantage of having it is that it reduces the cross sectional area of the post, so the shaft itself is not as strong. You can end up with this situation...

    Notice it sheared at the 1in drop hole.
    GD warrantied the shaft, but it was a little bit of an annoyance. Would have been a major issue if I was out on a road trip.
    Quote Originally Posted by saturnine
    that's the stupidest idea this side of pinkbike.

  75. #75
    lazy piston
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    Thanks for the reply AL29er! I hope this is not a common problem with the multi-position posts...

  76. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by Smith
    Thanks for the reply AL29er! I hope this is not a common problem with the multi-position posts...
    I believe it was a fairly common problem on the older ones, but has since been fixed. I've had no problems on my replacement, which I've been riding a couple of years now. Great customer service, by the way.


  77. #77
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    Quote Originally Posted by wankel
    I believe it was a fairly common problem on the older ones, but has since been fixed. I've had no problems on my replacement, which I've been riding a couple of years now. Great customer service, by the way.

    Ohh!!! was this a photo of a GD-Turbo Multi-position 4 inch?

  78. #78
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    Turbo or Classic makes no diff since they share the same internals. The hollow post is the old version. The solid one I posted is the "fixed" version. The guys at GD were most interested in getting it back to see how/why their beefed up version broke. No, it is not a common failure these days. I am simply outside the normal bell curve at 240lb and I had the pin facing forwards. To top that I had the saddle all the way back on the rails. It was definitely the perfect storm wrt breaking the post I don't fault GD for the break, it was a bad way to have it setup and I am fat
    Quote Originally Posted by saturnine
    that's the stupidest idea this side of pinkbike.

  79. #79
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    Quote Originally Posted by AL29er
    Turbo or Classic makes no diff since they share the same internals. The hollow post is the old version. The solid one I posted is the "fixed" version. The guys at GD were most interested in getting it back to see how/why their beefed up version broke. No, it is not a common failure these days. I am simply outside the normal bell curve at 240lb and I had the pin facing forwards. To top that I had the saddle all the way back on the rails. It was definitely the perfect storm wrt breaking the post I don't fault GD for the break, it was a bad way to have it setup and I am fat

    OMG!!! Hey Al, I am on the same weight as you! Do you think this GD is not that reliable for Big, Fat Butt riders?

    Is the Pin Facing forward something to do with the breakage?

    Thanks!

  80. #80
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    Quote Originally Posted by TNT-Spot
    OMG!!! Hey Al, I am on the same weight as you! Do you think this GD is not that reliable for Big, Fat Butt riders?

    Is the Pin Facing forward something to do with the breakage?

    Thanks!
    190 - 200 lbs and I broke two early edition ones (pin forward) within one year each. I have been on the improved model for three years (pin forward still) with no issues. While not a complete lard-butt I ride fairly agessively and would recommend the recent model to anyone.

  81. #81
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    I think any seatpost with a 200+lb rider and the saddle set to the max rear position is a reliability issue in the making. It is just bad practice. Far better to keep the saddle within about 10mm of mid-rail position. I was just playing around with position on the bike and different stems at the time of the break. I knew the consequences of the setup, so I was not overly surprised that it broke.

    Yes, pin was forward. Again, not good practice for a clyde. I have always gotten away with pin forward on my GD posts (going back to around 2005, 4 different posts). All have been the heavy duty solid shaft. This was my first try at the multi-drop inner though.

    I think breaking one seatpost every 4-5 years is about par for the course. Heck, I used to go through at least one break or bend every season. I have grown older and wiser, now I buy mostly higher quality products with lower failure rates
    Quote Originally Posted by saturnine
    that's the stupidest idea this side of pinkbike.

  82. #82
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    I do remember at some point that they recommended a 200 lbs. weight limit for the 3 position post. Not sure if that's still the case with the newer, beefier design.

  83. #83
    lazy piston
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    Well I'm no clyde at 180 lbs all geared up. And if I finally decide on buying a GD it will definitely be a new (beefed up) version, so I guess I shouldn't really be worried.

    I just can't quite cope with the added weight since I have spent quite a bit of time (and $$) shaving grams from my bike, plus I've been doing mostly ok with my non-adjustable Masterpiece seatpost... on the other hand, I may just sell the GD if I don't like it or find too little use for it.

    Thanks for the info guys.

  84. #84
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    Quote Originally Posted by rmac
    190 - 200 lbs and I broke two early edition ones (pin forward) within one year each. I have been on the improved model for three years (pin forward still) with no issues. While not a complete lard-butt I ride fairly agessively and would recommend the recent model to anyone.
    Thanks! That's a relief.

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