Cold Weather Jacket Options?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Cold Weather Jacket Options?

    OK Homers, we ride year round in VA...but, consistently in temps below 30* this time of year. I really need something that has some level of warmth (not a windbreaker) yet isn't overly parka-like or super hot & bulky. It would also be nice if it could handle a decent wreck every now & again without shredding to bits. The closest thing I have seen to what I would like is the Race Face Shore or possibly the atlas jackets....any other decent options


  2. #2
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    Layers are the key, I don't like bulky jackets either, for sub 30 temps I use a base layer, a middle layer like a long sleeve jersey or fleece top, and then a windbreaker, if it's sunny out I don't even use the windbreaker.

    It's about 10 degrees in this pic, I've got a beanie on under the helmet with winter gloves and wool socks/Shimano trail shoes which are actually very warm and keep your feet dry.

  3. #3
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    nike used to make a "thermal jacket" that works great. i picked one up and with a body armor winter base layer, a fleece sugoi jersey and the occasional fleece vest, i can ride in temps down to 0 or just below. no word on crash resistance though. i just checked the nike site and the closest thing i found had discovery team logos all aver it. if ya can find last years grey or green model, grab one.
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    Softshell

    I think backcountry skiers have the "warm + breathable + durable" thing figured out pretty well. Unless you want a jacket made by a "cycling" company I would look at a Softshell jacket made of a Schoeller fabric like this:

    http://www.cloudveil.com/mens/v-jackets/CV03820/

    I can wear this when its 20 degrees out with one mid-weight layer under it.

    There are lots of brands to choose from and deals to be had if you search them out.
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  5. #5
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    Showers Pass

    I just got myself a Showers Pass Jacket. I have worn it on my daily commute the last couple of days with a light LS jersey and I was warm. It was 33 degrees the other day! I also have a Castelli winter jacket....one that I got severl years ago, that works great. I believe that it is rated down to 30 degrees...I wore it today with a short sleeve jersey and was more than comfortable (it was 37 today). I have worn this in colder temps and it works great. Louis Garneau also makes what looks like a great winter jacket....

  6. #6
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    $280??????? holy shep shyt! i thought the nike was bad at $110!
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  7. #7
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    Sierra Trading Post has some really good deals on Giordana, Sugoi and Pearl Izumi stuff. I picked up a nice Castelli jacket from them that works great in all but the coldest weather, packs up small enough to stuff in a Camelback pocket but is totally windproof up front and on the arms, breathable out the back, fleece lined. Coupled with a wool LS jersey it's pretty toasty. I prefer cycling specific jackets over the stuff I wear for tele skiing. The cycling stuff has better venting generally, a longer tail and longer sleeves. XC ski clothing works great for cycling too.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave in Driggs
    Unless you want a jacket made by a "cycling" company I would look at a Softshell jacket made of a Schoeller fabric like this:
    Soft shells are the way to go. High weather resistance, high breathability, tough as nails. Powershield fabric is great, too. But if you want something cheaper get one of the North Face Apex line.

  9. #9
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    It was a brisk 57 degrees at 6am this morning so I opted for a long sleeve t-shirt. Did about 15 miles and finished the ride by waving to Nicole Kidman. She's been jogging up in the hills a lot lately.

  10. #10
    rr
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    Another adv to layers and a lightweight jacket is the ability to change what your wearing if the temps get warmer during the ride, or your body.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dusty Bottoms
    It was a brisk 57 degrees at 6am this morning so I opted for a long sleeve t-shirt. Did about 15 miles and finished the ride by waving to Nicole Kidman. She's been jogging up in the hills a lot lately.
    ...I think you posted this on the wrong thread/ forum.


    ...thanks for the input to everyone else

    Before anyone else suggests layering, I have been riding in this area for over 10 years & am completely aware how to layer. I am simply tired of the time & effort & figure there has to be a better way. It is also closer to mid temps mostly here, where a windbreaker won't cut it alone, but a bunch of layers underneath the WB is just bulky & uncomfortable for most technical trail riding.

    Also, if it can't take a decent crash, no sense in me even trying it out.


  12. #12
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    Then you need one of these - GIVE ME THE RING FRODO!!!!!
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave in Driggs
    I think backcountry skiers have the "warm + breathable + durable" thing figured out pretty well. Unless you want a jacket made by a "cycling" company I would look at a Softshell jacket made of a Schoeller fabric like this:

    http://www.cloudveil.com/mens/v-jackets/CV03820/

    I can wear this when its 20 degrees out with one mid-weight layer under it.

    There are lots of brands to choose from and deals to be had if you search them out.
    Bingo, Dave nailed it....that's what all the ski touring guys I know wear. However, if you've already spent this quarter's "biking allowance" on I9 wheels, an Avy Chubbie or a gravity dropper, then you may need something more affordable than a good Schoeler jacket.

    I just picked up a Fox stormshield Jacket and it's nice although slightly too warm for Seattle weather (it doesn't ever really get THAT cold here). It isn't bulky and has big pit zips, a hood that fits nicely under a helmet (without restricting your peripheral vision), a pocket for an ipod and for your hands and it's pretty breathable. I've done 2 super wet days of trailwork wearing this jacket and it was very nice and kept me totally comfortable.

    FYI, they're selling them on ebay right now for pretty darn reasonable.

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  14. #14
    what...?
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    Pearl Izumi Barrier jacket with UnderArmor ColdGear mock turtleneck underneath.
    PI amfib tights or bib when its really cold, otherwise I use UnderArmor Coldgear tights.
    Craft socks and Answer Kashmir shoes w/ toe warmers

    tomorrow am is to be around 20 deg....I'll be perfectly comfortable
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  15. #15
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    Ask someone from this village in Switzerland it's a little chilly there.
    I aggree on the layers suggestion wicking base,thermal fleece mid layer and a Pertex wind proof outer.





    Stay off the brakes :)

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by jncarpenter

    Before anyone else suggests layering, I have been riding in this area for over 10 years & am completely aware how to layer. I am simply tired of the time & effort & figure there has to be a better way. It is also closer to mid temps mostly here, where a windbreaker won't cut it alone, but a bunch of layers underneath the WB is just bulky & uncomfortable for most technical trail riding.
    Well excuuuuse me
    Last edited by rr; 12-08-2006 at 03:47 PM.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by rroeder
    Well excuuuuse me
    ...hehe!

    The challenge here is that it rarely stays cold enough for me to utilize my North Face equip. left over from my VT/ Vail, CO days (I wish it did sometimes...I miss that stuff ). It is usually just cold enough that if you layer, you're bound to be shedding/ adding layers the whole ride & not warm enough to dress "normally". Ideally, I would like something I could wear with just my smartwool longsleeve jersey underneath for the average day & my underarmor coldgear in addition on the really cold days.

    I like the looks of the softshell stuff...not sure I can justify the cost for the average weather here.....but maybe I mean, I have the I9 wheelsets & Avalanche Chubby...but the lack of a GD post really opens up my opportunities


  18. #18
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    For warmth, check out a good cycling merino wool jacket. About a year ago I replaced my old Sugoi with a new Spot.

    https://www.spotbikes.com/catalogs/WoolCatalog2006.pdf

    Even if the wool jacket gets totally soaked, it is still warm. Doesn't stink, isn't bulky, breathable. What more could you want? I find it a very versitile piece of clothing.

    Then wear what ever is suitable on top depending on wind, temprature, rain, etc. Depending on what I'm doing that might be a windshell vest, cycling windbreaker, RaceFace jacket, or even a 3ply Gortex jacket.


    Whistler @ about -15C, Jan. 1 2005

    Pic of a snow ride on Vancouver Island a couple of weeks ago, I'm the guy with the blue RF jacket, Spot wool jacket under

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dusty Bottoms
    It was a brisk 57 degrees at 6am this morning so I opted for a long sleeve t-shirt. Did about 15 miles and finished the ride by waving to Nicole Kidman. She's been jogging up in the hills a lot lately.
    While Nicole was thinking, <i> "damn, there's that guy on the bike that's been following me, and he keeps waving!" </i>


  20. #20
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    I picked up a Gore Bike wear Finish jacket on clearance from nashbar for under $60 shipped. It is windproof, water resistant, but has a road pu$$y cut to it. Anyway, I was stoked to see the package arrive, but quickly dismayed to see how thin this thing was.

    I was however, wrong. This thing kicks @ss. I have commuted to work every day for the last 4 months and the past 8 weeks have been cold here in N. CO. This jacket is good from 25-45 F but I have used it for shorter spurts (under 90 min.) down to 20 and even on cloudy 50'ish days. It simply does not let wind through. And when the temp dips under 30, I am working hard enough to stay plenty warm.

    That said, you still need to bring LAYERS just in case the temp drops or something happens that does not allow you to keep generating heat.

  21. #21
    rr
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    Quote Originally Posted by jncarpenter
    ...hehe!

    The challenge here is that it rarely stays cold enough for me to utilize my North Face equip. left over from my VT/ Vail, CO days (I wish it did sometimes...I miss that stuff ). It is usually just cold enough that if you layer, you're bound to be shedding/ adding layers the whole ride & not warm enough to dress "normally". Ideally, I would like something I could wear with just my smartwool longsleeve jersey underneath for the average day & my underarmor coldgear in addition on the really cold days.

    I like the looks of the softshell stuff...not sure I can justify the cost for the average weather here.....but maybe I mean, I have the I9 wheelsets & Avalanche Chubby...but the lack of a GD post really opens up my opportunities
    We ride in single digit temps sometimes, mostly 20-40 degree range though. I always wear a base layer in the winter cause they regulate your body temp well, I use diff 2nd layers depending on the temp, and my PI shell depending on the conds, the PI shell has held up to a few falls also, including rocks, pretty rip resistant actually.

    I use the shell cause I have it and it works, as long as I'm dressed right underneath, temps can also vary greatly here so layers help.

  22. #22
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    Pearl Izumi Facet Jacket

    Pearl is one of only a few companies i've seen that make a WINDPROOF FRONT/BREATHEABLE BACK jacket


    The color contrast in this jacket depicts the windproof fabric on the front, and front of arms.The underside of the arms and whole back is 1 really thin layer of fleecey material.

    I wear this jacket in 20-30 degree temps for winter night riding, commuting, road, etc.It is a bit warm on longer climbs,but it's the best vapor management jacket i've found yet.

    You have to look in the XC ski line to find it. There is a Pearl outlet in Park City Utah, that's where i got mine, $100.00. There were 3 different ones there with thicker insulation, but i got the thinnest one and wear a long sleeve base layer, that's it for techy XC.Maybe a really thin fleece vest if it's in the low 20's and i'm carrying some speed. Fleece lined coller is nice on the neck too.

    I'll take this jacket to the grave with me.
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  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by [email protected]
    Pearl is one of only a few companies i've seen that make a WINDPROOF FRONT/BREATHEABLE BACK jacket.
    My old Sugoi wool jacket is like that, but they no longer make any wool jackets.

  24. #24
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    Softshell is OK but it doesn't vent well enough for climbing in the granny gear!
    I've also got one of these for really cold days-the hood actually fits over a helmet! Still too hot to mtb in, road is OK. If i'm sweaty at the top of the climb i'm cold at the bottom of the descent. I usually do cold weather rides that consist of an immidiate climb to get warm and a good DH run back to the car.

    RaceFace Hoodlum Hoodie (Wind Chill soft shell)
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  25. #25
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    Ibex

    I picked-up a clima wool soft shell (74 % nylon, 20% merino wool, 6 spandex) from Orivis on clearance. I think I paid around 100 bucks. Full retail was 280 or so. Great jacket.

  26. #26
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    Mountain Hardware makes some great stuff too. Their Transition zip T and jacket are really light weight, breathable, windproof, pretty water proof, warm and have long sleeves and tail. A bit spendy but really versatile. I wear mine as an outerlayer down to about 20 degrees or as a midlayer for skiing or colder weather.
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  27. #27
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    Granny gear?

    Quote Originally Posted by [email protected]
    Softshell is OK but it doesn't vent well enough for climbing in the granny gear!
    I've also got one of these for really cold days-the hood actually fits over a helmet! Still too hot to mtb in, road is OK. If i'm sweaty at the top of the climb i'm cold at the bottom of the descent. I usually do cold weather rides that consist of an immidiate climb to get warm and a good DH run back to the car.

    RaceFace Hoodlum Hoodie (Wind Chill soft shell)
    You shouldn't be using that thing anyway.

  28. #28
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    ...I think I'm on to something HERE. Why didn't I start with LL Bean?



    ...or THIS

    Last edited by jncarpenter; 12-08-2006 at 06:04 PM.


  29. #29
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    That looks like the one to me.

    I found a nice one last week,its made by North face.Its almost exactly like that L.L.Bean.It was $125.00.

  30. #30
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    I got one just like that last fall at Old Navy for $10. That way when you crash - who cares.

    Quote Originally Posted by jncarpenter
    ...I think I'm on to something HERE. Why didn't I start with LL Bean?



    ...or THIS

    Nothing to see here.

  31. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by SSINGA
    I got one just like that last fall at Old Navy for $10. That way when you crash - who cares.
    ..Sean, you do realize there is more being considered here than looks & style, right?


  32. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by jncarpenter
    ..Sean, you do realize there is more being considered here than looks & style, right?
    With a few washes in NikWax it has the same performance as the LL Bean version and I don't care if it gets torn or dirty. I've seen you ride - I know you'll spend some time on the ground


    Another option
    Last edited by SSINGA; 12-08-2006 at 09:09 PM.
    Nothing to see here.

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by SSINGA
    With a few washes in NikWax it has the same performance as the LL Bean version and I don't care if it gets torn or dirty. I've seen you ride - I know you'll spend some time on the ground


    Another option
    ....I know you were aware of my adventures off the bike. However, you were always so far behind you never got to see any


    EDIT: Heated vest? A must have for every stocking stuffing Homer


  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by jncarpenter
    ....I know you were aware of my adventures off the bike. However, you were always so far behind you never got to see any


    EDIT: Heated vest? A must have for every stocking stuffing Homer

    blah...blah blah!


    For Homers in extreme climates I heard that there was a PUSH mod for the vest. Makes it heat faster and hotter. Plus, Dangerboy is making anno aluminum zipper pulls in colors for Fo.
    Nothing to see here.

  35. #35
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    ...ended up going with this (on sale at Dick's for $99):



  36. #36
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    Seems like there are two kinds of people when it comes to these winter clothes. There are those that just throw money at the problem, and then those that are smart.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    Seems like there are two kinds of people when it comes to these winter clothes. There are those that just throw money at the problem, and then those that are smart.
    ...& which category do you fall into?


  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by jncarpenter
    ...& which category do you fall into?
    Both. Cheap shoes have thicker soles, and more insulation. Pared up with the thickest wool socks I could buy (relatively cheap) and gore-tex socks, I'm set up for pretty much anything that the local weather can throw at me. You don't have to spend a crapload to get some decent polypro wicking type layers. I have found that spending money on pants helps though. As far as the upper wind-breaker layer, there's a lot that works just fine and doesn't have the "for biking" stamp on it.

    There are some areas where it does pay to spend some money, but some of this crap is just name-brand stuff stamped "for biking" that doesn't perform any better than any other "cold weather" gear that can be had fairly cheaply.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    Both. Cheap shoes have thicker soles, and more insulation. Pared up with the thickest wool socks I could buy (relatively cheap) and gore-tex socks, I'm set up for pretty much anything that the local weather can throw at me. You don't have to spend a crapload to get some decent polypro wicking type layers. I have found that spending money on pants helps though. As far as the upper wind-breaker layer, there's a lot that works just fine and doesn't have the "for biking" stamp on it.

    There are some areas where it does pay to spend some money, but some of this crap is just name-brand stuff stamped "for biking" that doesn't perform any better than any other "cold weather" gear that can be had fairly cheaply.

    Yeah and sometimes the "for biking" stamp as you put it is just plain better. Breathability is probably more important than actual wind breaking ability. You could ride with a cheap, plastic/rubber wind and waterproof layer, but being soaked in your own sweat doesn't really accomplish anything. You will eventually be worse off than if you just rode with a warm, non-wind/waterproof layer.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    Both. Cheap shoes have thicker soles, and more insulation. Pared up with the thickest wool socks I could buy (relatively cheap) and gore-tex socks, I'm set up for pretty much anything that the local weather can throw at me. You don't have to spend a crapload to get some decent polypro wicking type layers. I have found that spending money on pants helps though. As far as the upper wind-breaker layer, there's a lot that works just fine and doesn't have the "for biking" stamp on it.

    There are some areas where it does pay to spend some money, but some of this crap is just name-brand stuff stamped "for biking" that doesn't perform any better than any other "cold weather" gear that can be had fairly cheaply.
    I have to agree, I just use the basic winter stuff I already have and the PI shell I've had for years, I also use wool socks and cheap Shimano trail shoes which are insulated and keep my feet dry/warm, this works in single digit temps. I use my old tights under standard nut huggers and baggies, my legs are never cold, I prefer that over pants and it's obviously cheaper too.

    That said, that looks like a nice score JNC, is that a soft shell jacket or a heavy middle layer?

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by rroeder
    That said, that looks like a nice score JNC, is that a soft shell jacket or a heavy middle layer?
    ...soft shell. It is exactly what I was looking for.


  42. #42
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtn hack
    . You could ride with a cheap, plastic/rubber wind and waterproof layer, but being soaked in your own sweat doesn't really accomplish anything. You will eventually be worse off than if you just rode with a warm, non-wind/waterproof layer.
    Uh huh...tell you what, I was a ski-racer before I was a mountain biker, so I'm pretty knowledgable, I've also been cold and wet, and dry and warm, plenty of times in the Army, so I have a pretty good idea what works. Some people will throw away money on "winter shoes" when they aren't really needed. Some people will throw away money on "waterproof" wears that don't really keep the water out in extreme conditions. Some people will use layers that will not keep them warm in when they get wet either. There are ways to keep from getting wet, but there are also situations where it will happen no matter what. There is the issue of the extremities as well, and in many just above freezing to a bit below freezing temps, if you keep things like the feet and hands real warm, you don't have to worry about losing so much core temp. When it's real cold, you have to do a lot more to keep the core warm. Depending on which part of your body is warm, blood will circulate and either cool off or warm your body. It's always a balance and dressing up like an eskimo (like my buddy paul) is not the way to do it unless temps are well below freezing. There's a lot of cold weather gear that is made for "other" sports and activities, and it works as well or better than some of our "for biking" stuff.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    Uh huh...tell you what, I was a ski-racer before I was a mountain biker, so I'm pretty knowledgable, I've also been cold and wet, and dry and warm, plenty of times in the Army, so I have a pretty good idea what works. Some people will throw away money on "winter shoes" when they aren't really needed. Some people will throw away money on "waterproof" wears that don't really keep the water out in extreme conditions. Some people will use layers that will not keep them warm in when they get wet either. There are ways to keep from getting wet, but there are also situations where it will happen no matter what. There is the issue of the extremities as well, and in many just above freezing to a bit below freezing temps, if you keep things like the feet and hands real warm, you don't have to worry about losing so much core temp. When it's real cold, you have to do a lot more to keep the core warm. Depending on which part of your body is warm, blood will circulate and either cool off or warm your body. It's always a balance and dressing up like an eskimo (like my buddy paul) is not the way to do it unless temps are well below freezing. There's a lot of cold weather gear that is made for "other" sports and activities, and it works as well or better than some of our "for biking" stuff.
    Uh huh. How about telling us what it is you use instead of all the generalities.

    What do you wear (or would you if you rode in this) in 10-25 F with a steady 10 mph breeze and the threat of wet snow/sleet?

    Like I said previously, I have ridden every day during the week for the last 4 months, and the last 6 weeks have been cold. The temp has averaged during my rides at just below 30F and never above 40 and half the rides are in the dark.

    I never have had to wear more than 3 light weight layers above the waist and at most 2 on my legs. I would say I have it down, but if you can enlighten me, go for it.

  44. #44
    Te mortuo heres tibi sim?
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    generic zip neck poly pro layers. cheap, easy to get anywhere, don't seem to work any worse/better than some of the high zoot ones i've tried int he past. keep adding more until desired warmth is achieved. then add whatever shell. pit zips or some kind of under arm venting are a must for me; i work up a lot of heat and sweat like a mofo. shed layers as needed. the long neck zips are way better than the plain t-shirts style, to vent a little heat when needed.

    the only thing i like more about bike specific shells that is hard to find on non-bike stuff:
    1. dropped/longer tails in back keep things from riding up when stretched out on the bike.

    2. they tend to have lighter materials/more venting on the back. when wearing a camelback, i don't need nearly as much stuff on my back.

    foot wise, i always used to do the poly pro sock/wool sock combo thing paired with shoes a half size or so larger than normal. add gore tex sock or booties if it was really cold or wet. just picked up a set of answer kashmir winter shoes, last years model on closeout...... they rock! way warmer than the old way.

    i agree with jm on this point: if i can keep my head/hands/feet warm, i need far less for my extremities and core. money saved from getting no-name brand layering stuff means you can spend more on a quality shell, too.
    Florence Nightingale's Stormtrooper

  45. #45
    FleshwoundGravityResearch
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    Quote Originally Posted by scrublover
    (non-homer lurker...)

    generic zip neck poly pro layers. cheap, easy to get anywhere, don't seem to work any worse/better than some of the high zoot ones i've tried int he past. keep adding more until desired warmth is achieved. then add whatever shell. pit zips or some kind of under arm venting are a must for me; i work up a lot of heat and sweat like a mofo. shed layers as needed. the long neck zips are way better than the plain t-shirts style, to vent a little heat when needed.

    the only thing i like more about bike specific shells that is hard to find on non-bike stuff:
    1. dropped/longer tails in back keep things from riding up when stretched out on the bike.

    2. they tend to have lighter materials/more venting on the back. when wearing a camelback, i don't need nearly as much stuff on my back.

    foot wise, i always used to do the poly pro sock/wool sock combo thing paired with shoes a half size or so larger than normal. add gore tex sock or booties if it was really cold or wet. just picked up a set of answer kashmir winter shoes, last years model on closeout...... they rock! way warmer than the old way.

    i agree with jm on this point: if i can keep my head/hands/feet warm, i need far less for my extremities and core. money saved from getting no-name brand layering stuff means you can spend more on a quality shell, too.

    I have the same shoes and totally agree. I wear those and 1 pair of light wool socks and I am good to go (and that set up sure didn't cost much). A cheap pair of shoes and all the high zoot socks probably cost as much as the kashmir's and cannot be as warm.

    The point I need to make is, I don't spend a ton of money on any of my clothing. I challenge anyone to find better deals on bike or non-bike clothing. If you do, I will bet it isn't as efficient and it certainly wouldn't be better than what I have.

  46. #46
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtn hack
    Uh huh. How about telling us what it is you use instead of all the generalities.

    What do you wear (or would you if you rode in this) in 10-25 F with a steady 10 mph breeze and the threat of wet snow/sleet?

    Like I said previously, I have ridden every day during the week for the last 4 months, and the last 6 weeks have been cold. The temp has averaged during my rides at just below 30F and never above 40 and half the rides are in the dark.

    I never have had to wear more than 3 light weight layers above the waist and at most 2 on my legs. I would say I have it down, but if you can enlighten me, go for it.
    We don't get wet snow/sleet, it's usually snow here. It's too dry, and while it gets cold, it doesn't really do much. I do ride in and on the snow though.

    I also don't ride in the dark. I've never been really interested in it, sorry.
    "It's only when you stand over it, you know, when you physically stand over the bike, that then you say 'hey, I don't have much stand over height', you know"-T. Ellsworth

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  47. #47
    ... I guess you won't be
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    Armpit zippers are crucial in any jacket you want to buy - it's amazing how you can tune your jacket using real venting from zippers......

  48. #48
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jayem
    I also don't ride in the dark. I've never been really interested in it, sorry.
    .....Your loss bro. Honestly, the only redeeming quality for winter riding (for me) is the night riding


  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by jncarpenter
    .....Your loss bro. Honestly, the only redeeming quality for winter riding (for me) is the night riding

    No kidding.

    Hey, JnC, how do you like Lynchburg? My inlaws live there, and I will be out there for xmas.

  50. #50
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    agree on the layers. I have a thermal base layer, a jersy over that and a Craft jacket over that. The craft is thin but technical gear and really works. It is composed of 41% Polyester, 40% Polyamide or Polyamide Nylon, and 19% Polyurethan. It works awesome. This setup is good to about 30deg.

    Also, my mid section is sometimes pretty cold when I start the ride, but once warm up on climbing, the technical gear starts to work really good and I'm toasty as long as I am moving.
    Sound of Tires on Dirt: Sole Music
    Rides shared with friends: Soul Music

  51. #51
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtn hack
    Hey, JnC, how do you like Lynchburg? My inlaws live there, and I will be out there for xmas.
    ....it's great! I can't complain....we'll be out of town the 25-26th. I imagine you won't have your bike with you anyway


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