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  1. #1
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    Canfield Bros. Pedals. Initial review.

    Got mine on Monday. Had a chance to give a go over for an initial impression. I will update this thread as I get more time on them.

    The good:
    - Flat is the shiznit. Effectively lowering my BB height over 1/4 inch, which is huge when talking BB numbers.
    - Lighter than a dried cat's danglies. Feel like MG-1s but way more durable.
    - Rather large surface area compared to what they look like in photos.
    - Look really cool.
    - Without a doubt a performance upgrade!
    - Good traction

    The bad:
    - No instructions explaining pin patterns. Took me a while to make a best guess.
    - Tolerance for pin threads is not very consistent. Some are tight while others are wobbly as all hell.
    - Came with a note saying I needed to add more locktite to the threads. Seems only necessary because the holes are not to a perfect spec. I'm not sure if it's the pins or the hole itself. I would expect better for such a crazy price tag. On the other hand, I don't care too much as it can be fixed easily with more locktite.
    - I can feel the side bulges, but after riding more than 10 feet, you don't think of it at all. Still worth having them super low.
    - Side to side concave felt a little strange coming off front to back concave.
    - No gold ano spindle. That's OK though, since it would have looked like crap after a couple months.
    - Feels a little like standing on a bed of nails. Feels strange coming from other pedals, but I will get used to it. Could cause some serious skin removal in a crash.


    So far no spindle noise on the shoes. Will see after a few wet rides.

    Overall? I would say this is the single best improvement I've ever made to a bike. Lowering the BB height 1/4 inch is freaking HUGE! Anyone looking to lower their Highline should seriously consider this along with a zero stack top head set.

    I'm Sooooo stoked I didn't buy those flypaper pedals. Canfields beat them to the punch.

    One more thing. I noticed the pedals have patent pending? I assume that's a design patent and not a utility patent? I can't see any utility patent there.??
    Last edited by YoPawn; 09-24-2009 at 02:31 PM.

  2. #2
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    Good work, keep us updated on your acclimation to the bulges, now where's the pics?

  3. #3
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    Pics! Pics! PLEEEEESE?
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  4. #4
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    I don't have any pics. There are plenty on the site elsewhere.

    I don't have internet at home, just work, so I can't be bothered.

    Here's for the lazy peeps. Just pretend I took these photos.






  5. #5
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    Wow! That is one thiiiiiin platform pedal!

  6. #6
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    OK, I got 'em too.

    The good. . .
    -thin, which benefits three things. 1) lower center of gravity, 2) higher clearance, and 3) because your foot is closer the the axle, they are less likely to roll over (back to front and front to back) when cranking out the torque climbing.
    -light. I don't really care for the Highline, but kinda care on the Sultan.

    The bad. . .
    -expensive, but so are my Straitlines
    -I can feel the bulge on the outside at the beginning of my ride, the middle, the end, and every point inbetween. It's a fact of life. Can I live with it? Yes, probably. Do I like it? No, not really.
    -less grippy than my Straitlines, but not significantly. I use the longest pins and have tried different arrangements and combos, but the Straitlines come out ahead.

    The who cares. . .
    -looks. the best looking equipment is the best performing. I could give a rat's ass what they look like, unless they look like a rat's ass of course.

    Prognosis. . .
    I have religated them to my Sultan since I think the roll-over aspect is a significant attribute to tech climbing. The Sultan is my trail bike and the local trails are littered with tech climbing moves, that's where they're most benificial. Since the Straitlines are more secure, I prefer them on my Highline, which sees more air time.

  7. #7
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    This overall direction of really thin flat pedals is fantastic, lower BB & better technical climbing due to less roll over.

    Another one that just caught my eye is Point1. No bulge on the outside. And no special crank needed.
    I really need to find out more about them.

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  8. #8
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    Very cool... I saw a set on the Niner WFO and they felt nice and tacky on my 'Interbike walking shoes'.
    "It looks flexy"

  9. #9
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    so how do you figure these pedals lower your BB by 1/4".

  10. #10
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    Sorry, but how exactly are any of these better then the Kona Wah Wahs? Or any of the cooies? The WahWahs are just about as light, just a hair thicker, and cost half as much...

    I understand going high end for somethings, but not when a cheaper product beats it in almost every category.
    Stuff.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by dropmachine.com
    Sorry, but how exactly are any of these better then the Kona Wah Wahs? Or any of the cooies? The WahWahs are just about as light, just a hair thicker, and cost half as much...

    I understand going high end for somethings, but not when a cheaper product beats it in almost every category.
    So have you tried both the Canfield pedals and the Wah Wahs? Not sure where I ever mentioned the Canfields being better by any degree. Seems to me like I've presented a non-biased review of their own merit so far.

    I bought some sweet pedals from a small company that has actual faces behind it that I can support with my hard earned money. Pretty amazing for someone to have that attitude in the Turner forum of all places...

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by rideonjon
    so how do you figure these pedals lower your BB by 1/4".
    They don't. They are the same as lowering the BB 1/4 inch though since the pedal is thinner and my feet sit 1/4 lower to the ground.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by dropmachine.com
    Sorry, but how exactly are any of these better then the Kona Wah Wahs? Or any of the cooies? The WahWahs are just about as light, just a hair thicker, and cost half as much...

    I understand going high end for somethings, but not when a cheaper product beats it in almost every category.
    You seem a bit jaded dropmachine, like you are going out of your way to be negative towards the Canfield Brothers of late. Try to keep it productive please, you bring up valid points but your delivery is a bit unpleasant.

  14. #14
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    ... and if we just ... Update

    I'm liking these pedals more and more that I ride them. Work amazingly well for allmountain riding. Simply put, these are a big advantage to pedaling and pushing the bike through obstacles.

    With normal pedals, you have poor leverage over the rotation of the pedal when your feet are flat and the bike wants to hang up and yank your feet forward. That just simply DOES NOT HAPPEN with these pedals. Your feet just stay glued and you can focus on pushing through the hit as apposed to bend your feet back and rock the bike to get through. Both uphill and down.

    I'm not one to hype anything, but these pedals really are a huge performance gain for any type of riding.

    If they can now last me one season of PNW winter, then I will declare that these were worth every penny. If so, I will refuse to ever mount another type of pedal to my bikes. And, yes, all of my bikes will likely be running these in the future.

  15. #15
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    YoPawn - what kind of rig you riding?

    You live in the Seattle area? Our trails are so primo right now, but it's supposed to rain starting tomorrow and the forecast only goes to next Tuesday but it's all RAIN so they'll be soggy soon. I guess you'll get to see how well they do in mud now.
    "It looks flexy"

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by gticlay
    YoPawn - what kind of rig you riding?

    You live in the Seattle area? Our trails are so primo right now, but it's supposed to rain starting tomorrow and the forecast only goes to next Tuesday but it's all RAIN so they'll be soggy soon. I guess you'll get to see how well they do in mud now.
    Yup. Seattle. The land of ever-persisting mud bogs.

    I'm suspecting they will do just fine in the mud, but I will hold my opinion until next spring. Even if I have to pull them apart to re-lube every several months of wet riding, I will be happy. They are easy as hell to pull apart.

    The larger question is whether or not the pins hold in over the winter and not strip out the threads. I smack my pedals like crazy when ping ponging down skittery root sections. I usually fold pedals in one year, except for these.

    Sette Stomp pedals I bought in like 2005 and have gone through 4 bikes already. Never even touched once for maintenance and I still use them. Funny, because other people destroyed theirs in less than 1 ride.




    I currently have these on my Giant Reign X1, the bike I love to hate. They will be going back onto my Transition TransAM once it is back up and running. Depending on my riding, I will swap these pedals back and forth.

  17. #17
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    Wah Wah vs. Crampon

    Quote Originally Posted by dropmachine.com
    Sorry, but how exactly are any of these better then the Kona Wah Wahs? Or any of the cooies? The WahWahs are just about as light, just a hair thicker, and cost half as much...

    I understand going high end for somethings, but not when a cheaper product beats it in almost every category.
    You couldn't be any more wrong.

    I have a set of Wah Wah pedals now. Here's the breakdown:

    - Wah Wah comes with the pins in and looks to have a slightly better tolerance in the threads.
    - Wah Wah is not even close to the same thinness of the Crampon. Crampon is 1/2 as thick at the edge where your heel drops down. WAY more than "just a hair".
    - Wah Wah is VERY noticeably heavier than the Crampons. Which means they "might" be more durable, especially with the heavier duty backed pins.
    - Crampon "feels" much better when standing on it.
    - Wah Wah comes out to more than half the price if you buy them new from a good dealer.
    - Wah Wah is not a huge performance gain over regular pedals like the Crampons. They are not THAT thin at all. I can feel a distinct difference between the Wah Wah and Crampon in terms of getting the foot low.
    - Crampon DOES improve pedaling efficiency more in two ways. First is the reduced weight, which is less inertia fighting your feet every time you accelerate. Second is being locked down into the spindle allows your feet to put down power through more of the pedal stroke.
    - I do expect the Wah Wah to last longer without maintenance, but the Crampon is clearly a higher performance pedal. Not just a "little" like drop machine assumed.

  18. #18
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    Couldn't be any more wrong?

    From your own points I gather that the Wah Wah is: half the cost, better toleranced, probably more durable, and will last longer without maintenance.

    Crampons are: half as thick

    I would contend that the difference in weight between the two (~90 grams) isn't very noticable on the bike and during riding. I also don't buy the whole increase in pedalling efficiency claim. Considering the overall mass of everything you are accelerating the reduced weight means squat. Additionally being "locked into the spindle allowing your foot to put down more power through more of the pedal stroke" sounds like a load of marketing BS. I can see how in theory it might lead to a slight increase in efficiency but accounting for all of the other input factors I'm betting you will see marginal if any gains in practice.

    I honestly don't see how all of these "benefits" can justify a pedal that costs DOUBLE what a cheaper pedal does.

  19. #19
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    Hmm, sounds like we need a graph

    Brands aside... People's expectations of flat pedals are all over the board.
    A lot of folks seem to use them only for some rides, or only on their dedicated FR/DH bike.

    Others ride flats exclusively... I fall into this camp, and our off-season night-ride/session spot features a few stream crossings that killed several sets of cheaper flat pedals for me. I found the cheaper pedals frustrating, due to lack or replacement part availability, difficult to service, or they would get grindy/squeaky on long XC rides, the pedal would fall of the spindle, etc etc. Sure a cheaper pedal might get the job done, but a broken pedal can really eff up a fun ride quickly- much moreso than a blown shock or dodgy shifting. Not things I want to deal with on a back-country XC ride with dusty/sandy climbs and multiple stream crossings!


    So... spending an extra $30-50 on pedals is really not a big deal to me. I've ended up with Straitlines and couldn't be happier with them, especially since you can get them for under $100 if you look around. I don't really care about weight/efficiency but I do know I can trust them to get me back to the car every time.

  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by polandspring88
    Couldn't be any more wrong?

    From your own points I gather that the Wah Wah is: half the cost, better toleranced, probably more durable, and will last longer without maintenance.

    Crampons are: half as thick

    I would contend that the difference in weight between the two (~90 grams) isn't very noticeable on the bike and during riding. I also don't buy the whole increase in pedalling efficiency claim. Considering the overall mass of everything you are accelerating the reduced weight means squat. Additionally being "locked into the spindle allowing your foot to put down more power through more of the pedal stroke" sounds like a load of marketing BS. I can see how in theory it might lead to a slight increase in efficiency but accounting for all of the other input factors I'm betting you will see marginal if any gains in practice.

    I honestly don't see how all of these "benefits" can justify a pedal that costs DOUBLE what a cheaper pedal does.
    Um yeah... Please re-read my posts.

    Wah Wah is NOT half the price. mine came out to $100 shipped. Crampon was $155 shipped.
    better tolerance in the pins is not a huge gain as locktite makes up the difference.
    Wah Wah "may" be less maintenance, but only time will tell.
    Crampon IS A BIG performance gain over the Wah Wah. Unless you have these two set of pedals like I do, shut up. You're just e-speccing.
    Drop Machine clearly thought that the Wah Wah was close or better in all categories. That is clearly not true in my testing.

    So let's get something straight here. You don't need Crampons or Wah Wahs. They are a nice upgrade to some other pedals. I personally HAVE EXPERIENCE WITH THESE PEDALS! As to why people keep trying to disregard that fact and just speculate have no idea what they are really talking about.

    Just about every person I know of who has been on the Crampons love them and feel an obvious gain.

    When a bike can get up to the $6000 range what the f*ck does an extra $30-$50 means in order to get what you want?


    Ultimately like FM stated it's nice having a solid pedal that just gets the job done. Hopefully the Crampons hold up great too, which I am confident they will. That's why I bought the Wah Wahs for my other bike for the winter. They have been proven and I didn't need to lower my feet much on the TransAM as it already sits mega low.

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    Just to clarify, I have no problem with pedals or any other components for that matter being expensive as long as they can justify the larger price tag. Up until July of this year I rode flat pedals for the past 5 years or so in every condition imaginable and for every riding discipline there is. I can understand the advantage to buying a pedal that offers exceptional durability, maintenance, grip, etc at a higher price. With the Canfield Crampons there does not seem to be enough of a tangible (if any IMHO) difference to warrant spending what they are charging for them.

  22. #22
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    A few notes,

    The Crampons and the Wah Wahs are made in the same factory. I'm pretty sure the bearings are the same. Durability should be on par.

    I own neither, but i have a set of Deity pedals which also come out of the same factory.

    I only run platforms at the skatepark these days, i just love clips. The "feeling" of the crampons isn't quite as nice so i'll stay with what i have, but if i climbed with flats there would be NO QUESTION that i would buy Crampons. For DH they are nearly as important for traction and most importantly clearance wise. The price is hard to swallow for DH pedals that un doubtedly will get worn out in less than 2 seasons.

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    a dealer emailed me -- the point1's are $160 and available now.

    YMMV, but even though many of us own several 5K+ bikes, it's still a psychological barrier to pay over $100 for pedals. Like tires -- people don't like spending $$$ on what is essentially a wear item.

    I got the wah wahs when they first became available, and still like them. i noticed the lower profile vs my tiogas. i fully expect i'd like the even thinner pedals available now. i don't think it's just marketing hype. but since so many of these pedals are made in the same asian factories, i'd like to see a decent pedal that's thinner than the wah wah but under 100 bucks.

    lately i've been riding clipped-in at northstar, so this whole discussion might be moot for me.
    Originally posted by bucksaw87
    I still fail to see how mustaches, fixies, and PBR are ironic.

  24. #24
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    Crampon pin sizes

    Just received my pedals and I'm curious to know what pin sizes everyone prefers on these. There are 3 sizes and the instructions say to use the longer on the outside, but I have a choice for the middle section. Any input would be great!
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    Quote Originally Posted by <sL4yEr>RuLz
    Just received my pedals and I'm curious to know what pin sizes everyone prefers on these. There are 3 sizes and the instructions say to use the longer on the outside, but I have a choice for the middle section. Any input would be great!
    I run the long pins on the inside holes near the cranks.

    I run the medium pins for everything else but the front and back three where it is thinnest at the edge.

    I run the small ones on the front and back edge.



    By the way. I have been on these pedals for a while now and have put them through some snotty crap.

    YES, they do gum up faster than other pedals. BUT they are also a bunch of times easier to clean and take apart. Mine take 5 minutes being lazy to pull them off, clean and relube. Has to be done about every 5th muddy ride. In the dry, they go forever.


    I have laid these suckers into some nasty rocks and crap too. While the outside finish seems to come off easily, the metal itself is very intact and does not get hurt. They tend to just skip right over when making contact.

    Only bent one pin so far.

    Have not needed to re-lock-tite any of them.


    I am totally sold on these! Compared to what other things cost for extra performance, I don't give a crap if they only last two seasons. It is worth it. I do expect them to last me a very very very long time.

    Still have to say, no other platform pedal climbs or descends as well as these suckers. I am using them on my do-it-all Reign X1.

  26. #26
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    I'm trying NOT to like these:



    I want something different just to try something different. I've yet to find an excuse to ditch these though. They are pretty flippin' light, hook up extremely well and so far, haven't given me any issues. I'm on my second season on them and some pretty harsh mud in between...

  27. #27
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    I'm using these:







    These are called Dartmoor Fever, but Dartmoor is just a brand, they don't sell their own designs, just using Taiwanese catalog, so I'm sure there are other brands selling the same design. 368g, 100mm x 100mm, 16mm high. Really impressive grip !

    I have it for just few months, so far they hold on strong. Sorry - these are not my photos, just took a link from some online shop.

  28. #28
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    i got a pair of these recently. very light, pretty darn thin, and grippy. pricey though, but look at all that cnc work. looks like they would take a week to make. very unique
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Canfield Bros. Pedals. Initial review.-arachnid_clear_big.jpg  


  29. #29
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    Man, people really do go out of their way to find reasons not to buy the Canfields. If anything you are supporting good people, not a faceless marketing agency.

  30. #30
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    The crampons are without a doubt the best pedals I have ever ridden. My roommate bought some wah wah's because he works at a kona dealer and got them at cost. Though he likes his pedals alot, he likes my pedals more (and if he could have scraped the extra 50 bucks together for them, he would have without hesitation).

    Everybody who has every tried my pedals have loved them instantly, and most end up liking the buldge (myself included).

    As far as a performance upgrade, they were one of the cheapest big performance upgrades I've ever put on my bike. (wide bars are the only thing that spring to mind as being cheaper and as markedly better).
    Last edited by William42; 03-17-2010 at 06:10 PM.

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    Quote Originally Posted by William42
    The crampons are without a doubt the best pedals I have ever ridden. My roommate bought some wah wah's because he works at a kona dealer and got them at cost. He likes my pedals more.

    Everybody who has every tried my pedals have loved them instantly, and most end up liking the buldge (myself included).

    As far as a performance upgrade, they were one of the cheapest big performance upgrades I've ever put on my bike. (wide bars are the only thing that spring to mind as being cheaper and as markedly better).
    Word. People are pretty entrenched in their own mindsets until they try my pedals too. Everyone loves them instantly.

    The thing I love the most is the outside bulge. It really cups the foot into there when snapping the bike out to the side with little pressure on the pedals. Literally just as easy to move the bike laterally as a set of clipless pedals.

    My Wah Wahs really feel insufficient in comparison when I jump onto the Highline. Will be dumping those shortly I hope.

  32. #32
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    Agreed!

    Called Canfield to check the status of my order and got a hold of Lance (out walking the dog). While he was walking back to check, we chit-chatted about their new Nimble 9 coming out. Pretty cool!

    Anyways, after installation, I noticed I can still rotate the pins with an allen wrench. This was after I let them sit for at least 36 hours (after using Red Loctite). Normal? I mean, the feel secured....
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    What side bulge?

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by bobvanjr
    What side bulge?
    Look at post #4, pic #1.

    Yo Pawn, how do the Crampons handle mud? They look like they wouldn't shed so well with the little holes.

  35. #35
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    Had these crampons for a couple of months now, got to say I'm pretty disappointed with the build quality and attention to detail that has gone into what is a really expensive pedal set. The DU bushes are failing already due to there not being any kind of seal on the outside of the bush. Some kind of recessed O-ring in the pedal body alongside the DU bush wouldn't have gone amiss.
    The axle nuts keep coming loose and unwinding, which results in the pedal falling off!!! Did Locktite these on in the end, but as you need to keep dismantling these pedals to clean the crap out of the bushes and re-grease, this gets a little boring. Have managed to source some Nylock nuts to replace the originals. These seems to have done the trick.
    Now the pins!!!! Due to the shoddy tolerances, no matter how much Locktite you use, they keep unscrewing. I have resorted to using two pack Araldite adhesive. Not going anywhere now!
    All in all not a great product for $150,but they sure do look trick.
    Last edited by hoggyuk; 05-10-2010 at 12:16 AM.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by hoggyuk
    Had these crampons for a couple of months now, got to say I'm pretty disappointed with the build quality and attention to detail that has gone into what is a really expensive set pedals. The DU bushes are failing already due to there not being any kind of seal on the outside of the bush. Some kind of recessed O-ring in the pedal body alongside the DU bush wouldn't have gone amiss.
    The axle nuts keep coming loose and unwinding, which results in the pedal falling off!!! Did Locktite these on in the end, but as you need to keep dismantling these pedals to clean the crap out of the bushes and re-grease, this gets a little boring. Have managed to source some Nylock nuts to replace the originals. These seems to have done the trick.
    Now the pins!!!! Due to the shoddy tolerances, no matter how much Locktite you use, they keep unscrewing. I have resorted to using two pack Araldite adhesive. Not going anywhere now!
    All in all not a great product for $150,but they sure do look trick.
    I've found the same with the DU bush wearing quick and the same with the shitty little nut holding the pedal on always getting loose. Another rushed to the punter product from the Canfield Brothers

  37. #37
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    I see a pattern forming here.

    Seems like A LOT of the people living outside of the USA have been sent a bad batch or something. Lots of good reviews of them here and tons of complaining elsewhere.

    Both hoggyyuk and Bike Whore are foreigners.

    Mine have been great still. I use Park polylube with no issues.

    I wonder how many people don't put grease in there often enough or ever?
    I could see the bushing go out quick from lack of proper lubing.

    It does seem strange they did not use locking nuts though. I might switch mine over even though they haven't budged at all.

  38. #38
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    Last edited by hoggyuk; 05-10-2010 at 11:39 AM.

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