Any GD Descender seatpost owners on Turners out there?- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Any GD Descender seatpost owners on Turners out there?

    I am an indecisive rider who keeps going back and forth in trying to decide to go with the GD h/bar mount or Descender seatpost.

    I originally was going to get the h/bar GD due to simplicity and price, but it seems that everyone here is in favor of the h/bar mount instead of seatpost mount. I like the idea of saving a few bucks and a little weight in getting the Descender since my new RFX frame build is getting a little "out of control" in the pocketbook and weight for general trail riding. Also, I don't like the idea of having something else on the bars and more cables on the bike. But, since I use my ETA on the fork for climbs manually, can I reach for the post mount before and after the climb as well... or am I better off trying to juggle mid-ride, I don't know?

    So any of you Descender owners out there wouldn't mind sharing your experience for general all-purpose riding? I primarily ride in the NW with rides with both short steep rollers and long climbs/decents.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    No, that's not phonetic
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    I have both and prefer the remote version. Once you get used to being able to drop the saddle ANYTIME and ANYWHERE, there is no going back. I actually crashed once while raising the saddle on the Descender when I took my hands off the bars to pop the knob. You can pick your section of trail to raise or lower the saddle, but it definitely is a sketchy one or two seconds while you perform the operation. Sometimes you come up on a techy section and just don't have time to drop the saddle as your hands are busy with other chores. The remote makes all these worries moot.

    If you want a Descender, I will sell you one of mine. I still have one on my 5-Spot. Some day I will replace it with a remote version, perhaps. I have another just gathering dust.
    My video techniques can be found in this thread.

  3. #3
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    I have a descender post on my Spot and it really works well for me. Our local trails generally involve climbing to the top of a ridgeline and turning around and pointing it down. This means I have minimal interaction with the GD. For rolling terrain, it's still good, but not ideal. I picked up a remote GD for my RFX because a) I wanted to try the remote, and b) it does get a little sketchy reaching down to drop the saddle if you wait to long and find yourself in a techy section with a full-height saddle.

  4. #4
    PSI
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    I want that one
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    I have the decender.... get the GD

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgusta
    So any of you Descender owners out there wouldn't mind sharing your experience for general all-purpose riding? I primarily ride in the NW with rides with both short steep rollers and long climbs/decents.

    Thanks.
    I posted on the other thread regarding this topic and I don't have anything new to share with regard to my experiences, but one thing aside from weight, cost, and clutter to consider is how often you ride new trails.

    If you tend to ride the same trails over and over you're already going to know when and where you'll want to drop the post and you'll plan accordingly. The DescenderPost makes sense here and its still an improvement over stopping, getting off the bike, grabbing the QR, etc, etc.

    If you take a lot of road trips to new places and like to ride into the unknown, the handlebar-mounted lever of the GravityDropper could really save your carcass if you come up on something unexpectedly techy. I like road trips and if I come up on something I stop, put a foot down, and pull the DP's knob (and its still an improvement over a QR, IMO, because you rarely have to stop again to raise it)...or I just do what we all used to do and chance it.

    Since you're sitting on the fence, are you more likely to regret having bought the DP because it lacks the safety and convenience of the h/b lever? Or are you more likely to regret having bought the GD because you don't like the added cable, lever, and cost. I'd wager you're more likely to regret having the DP. You're more likely to regret what you don't have (the h/b lever of the GD) than to regret having something you do have (if that makes any sense).


  6. #6
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    Try this yourself. Ride your favortite trail, and every time you come to a section you would want to change your saddle height, reach down and touch your seat post. If that feels ok to you, you may be able to do fine without the remote. When I was making the same purchase as you, I did the same thing. I found out fast I didn't like taking my hands from the bars on my trails. Some factors : lots of rocks, sand and things that like to grab your front tire!

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by scepticshock
    Try this yourself. Ride your favortite trail, and every time you come to a section you would want to change your saddle height, reach down and touch your seat post. If that feels ok to you, you may be able to do fine without the remote. When I was making the same purchase as you, I did the same thing. I found out fast I didn't like taking my hands from the bars on my trails. Some factors : lots of rocks, sand and things that like to grab your front tire!
    Thanks guys,

    That makes a lot of sense under those circumstances. It is a tough call, since I do mostly ride the same trails around here and know all of the short, steep climb sections which I would want the GD for, but I don't think I would have enough time to compress the ETA on my Marz Z1 and pull the knob on the post before the climb while continuing on the ride. So GD w/hbar remote it is.

    Clyde S Dale, do you find yourself regreting not getting or having the GD or are you content with the set-up you have?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by jgusta
    Clyde S Dale, do you find yourself regreting not getting or having the GD or are you content with the set-up you have?
    I have no regrets with the DescenderPost; and I'm sticking with it. It still beats a QR collar anyday.

    I've had moments where I've thought about the GravityDropper with the extra detents, especially on rolling terrain with rocks and ledges. It would be nice to drop to a 1 inch detent while keeping my hands on the bar to get a little extra clearance on quick downs while maintaing good pedalability for the ups. However, in almost 18 months of use I can think of exactly ONE time when I wanted a Gravity Dropper and that was during a 6 hour endurance race that had a couple of steep rollers and hairpin turns. For me that still doesn't justify the added cost, clutter, and hardware, but I'm a minority opinion here.

    The only thing that bugs me are the people who look at the rubber boot and ask me, in a smug and self-satisfied tone, why I have a suspension seatpost on a full suspension bike. I just tell them I have a bad back.


  9. #9
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    So if you could score a new GD dropper for $30 more ($190) than a Descender ($160)would you do it or still stay with the DS? I hate clutter too, but having the GD routed like those guys do under the bars on the GD post, looks like it would work out alright and I spend about 1/2 my time riding on trails that have rollers or short, steep up/downs that a remote would be nice.

    Thanks again, I am just being stubborn in trying to justify buying almost a $200 seatpost. Oh, that is funny sh**t about the having a bad back and the bootie. Yeah, sometimes its best to tell people something just to shut them up.

  10. #10
    Lay off the Levers
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    There's no question, the more frequent the drops, rollers and diversions, the greater the utility the GD has. For only $30 more you'd be wasting your money NOT getting it.

    I hit my GD with almost as much ease as I hit my shifters. It's big plus on balance and control to be able to stay more centered and lower over the bike on tricky steep decents. With a standard QR I'd always leave it up b/c my trails go from up to down every five minuets, with rollers and drops scattered all along the way.
    Faster is better, even when it's not.

  11. #11
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    Given the terrain you ride and price for which you can get the GravityDropper, I'd get the GravityDropper and mount up the hardware. IF you really end up hating all the extra gear you can eBay the GD and buy the DP instead. With the prices people pay for stuff on eBay you'd probably make money on the deal.

    Whatever you do make up your mind soon, man!


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