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  1. #1
    Monkey Wrench
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    120mm fork on DW Flux?

    I'm setting up a Flux for XC and some endurance racing near Seattle - has anyone set up their DW Flux with a 120mm fork? I would love the extra cush, but I don't want to sacrifice performance or DT's magical handling...
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  2. #2
    Wicketed
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    I reckon opinion will probably be pretty split on this one, as lots of folks rate slightly longer travel, but usually with the option of a wind-down. I've an 05 flux with a 100mm reba and the balance feels so spot on i'd never want to mess with it by putting more travel on the front. But the anti-squat characteristics of the DW flux should mean the bike will handle the 120mm better without going to choppery on the climbs.

    Depends if you really want a focused racing bike (ie both XC and enduro) or if you reckon enjoying the downhill techy bits more on general training and trail rides is worth the compromise of a bit less of a head-down hammer-machine on raceday.
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  3. #3
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    Smile

    I going to have a 650b front wheel on the 09 flux in a month or so. this raises the
    front 12mm or so. sticking with a 100mm fork.

  4. #4
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    I ride a Flux and aside from the LBS recommending no more then 100mm, the ride is amazing with just 100mm. The flux handles so well that for it's purpose as a x-country bike that anything more would ruin what the bike is so well known for. Perhaps my favorite characteristic about the Flux is that it manages to feel like it has more rear end travel then the 100mm would suggest. Turner has lots of alternatives if you want more travel, but I am very content with my Flux and a 100mm fork.

  5. #5
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    I have an 08 Flux and a 09 Reba Team with maxle light. I have ridden it at 100 and 120 mm. I find the handling too slow and the front end wanders too much on the steepest climbs at 120mm. Fork is staying at 100mm on this bike. I haven't ridden a DWL Flux but reckon the results would be similar. We don't have long sustained climbs here is NJ but they are often seriously steep. If you pick a half decent line the Flux is an amazing descender too.

  6. #6
    Natl. Champ DH Poser/Hack
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    this question needs its own forum. a dedicated 120 will rake out the front causin it to wander on climbs, bob under big efforts on smooth terrain and push in fast, flat corners. not a good race fork for a flux. go adjustable or stick with a 100 if its gonna be a race only bike. i prefer 80-120mm adjustable on the flux by a mile.
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  7. #7
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    Sag??

    Whenever this topic comes up I wonder why no one mentions intended amount of sag. I mean would 120 on a flux really chopper it out if you are planning on running 33% sag? Granted it would not be a good race day fork but all that neg suspension would really help to smooth out the trail, I would think it would be great if you were looking for a 'all day' type ride.

    Am I missing something???

  8. #8
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    I had a TNT Flux with 130mm on the front. I lowered the bars an equal amount, relative to the raise in front end height, and didn't notice any difference on super-steep climbs, but I did enjoy the slower handling on the downs.

    I think bar height is the key to climbing prowess, and head angle wins on the downhill.

  9. #9
    Natl. Champ DH Poser/Hack
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    Quote Originally Posted by CDtofer
    would 120 on a flux really chopper it out if you are planning on running 33% sag?
    in my opinion, yes. i set the sag on my flux at 30-ish (+/- a few lbs) dependin on the trail conditions and a extra 1 deg oh hta would make all the diff in handelin. maybe im more picky than others too. if ya want a 5" bike buy one, dont try to create 1/2 of one is what im sayin.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by CDtofer
    Whenever this topic comes up I wonder why no one mentions intended amount of sag. I mean would 120 on a flux really chopper it out if you are planning on running 33% sag? Granted it would not be a good race day fork but all that neg suspension would really help to smooth out the trail, I would think it would be great if you were looking for a 'all day' type ride.

    Am I missing something???
    I don't know any air fork that runs well with 33% sag. I find that brake dive and mid-stroke wallow on most air forks gets unacceptable for me past the 20% sag mark. Particularly if the ride involves steep rock rollers where the fork should ride high in the travel, there is no amount of low-speed compression damping that will counteract the sloppiness of the air mid-stroke, particularly when undersprung.

    Granted some forks are better than other, and with the 36 TALAS I can certainly afford more sag than with a 100mm fork, but even with the 36 I don't go past 25%. I'd rather have to work with my arms a bit more than feel the fork disappear from under me in a hard corner or on a chunky run-out after a steep roller.

  11. #11
    Moosehead
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    +1 at 100m the flux is perfect, only might seek a little more travel on the extended gnarlier downs which I agree, only makes sense with an adjustable fork. otherwise, you'll be missing the primary genius of the flux which is climbing and extremely fast handling.

  12. #12
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    Interesting. I was wondering the same thing as the OP. The Turner site says that the geometry is based on 480mm axle to crown. A Fox F100 is 470mm, while the F120 is 490mm (http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=373698). Surely, sag, tire choice and bar placement matter, but the Flux geo seems to be targeted right in the middle.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by multiaxial
    Interesting. I was wondering the same thing as the OP. The Turner site says that the geometry is based on 480mm axle to crown. A Fox F100 is 470mm, while the F120 is 490mm (http://forums.mtbr.com/showthread.php?t=373698). Surely, sag, tire choice and bar placement matter, but the Flux geo seems to be targeted right in the middle.
    No, don't do it. Even 10mm will RUIN the otherworldly magic handling of the flux. W/ a 480mm fork, choirs of angles will sing when you climb on your bike. 10mm extra will make it ride like total crap. Don't try to second guess genius.

    If you can't tell I'm joking. It's pretty funny when people talk about 20mm "destroying" the handling of a bike when they probably swap forks w/ the "same" travel which vary in height by almost that much. FWIW, I'd get an adjustable fork like the Reba UTurn, that way you could dial it in exactly the way you want it.

  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by nybike1971
    I don't know any air fork that runs well with 33% sag. I find that brake dive and mid-stroke wallow on most air forks gets unacceptable for me past the 20% sag mark. Particularly if the ride involves steep rock rollers where the fork should ride high in the travel, there is no amount of low-speed compression damping that will counteract the sloppiness of the air mid-stroke, particularly when undersprung.

    I'd rather have to work with my arms a bit more than feel the fork disappear from under me in a hard corner or on a chunky run-out after a steep roller.
    I agree, I have never liked the way a fork feels with the recommended amount of sag, even on longer travel forks I don't usually get more than 20% of the travel after I get it setup right. I'm getting 20mm sag on my Reba 120 and it feels perfect, I get around 40-45mm sag on my Boxxer with heavy spring, I was getting the recommended 30%+ sag with the regular spring and the fork would bottom off a 3ft ledge.

    OP- I ran a Revelation 100-130 Uturn on my old Burner and it was great, I wouldn't of liked a set 120 travel fork tho, it was good on the steep downs but felt funky everywhere else.

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