Remedy, Fuel and other Trek full suspension owners: Check your pivot bearings!- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Remedy, Fuel and other Trek full suspension owners: Check your pivot bearings!

    This has been mentioned a couple of times already. The pivot bearings of newer Trek full suspension bikes (2008 and after) have little to no grease.

    My 08 Remedy has 16 months, but unfortunately only about 500 miles. I never rode it in the rain, or crossed creaks. And rode in serious mud not more than 2 or 3 times. Still, I was barely able to move to of the bearings with my fingers once I took the frame apart (both on the Evo link), and one of the main pivot bearings was essentially seized. I found only trace amounts of grease in all bearings, but none at all on these 3.

    I greased the hell out of them and worked the bearings, and they're all running smooth (ish) now.

    Do yourself, your wallet and your frame a favor, and do what those who received the thousands of bucks should have done: grease the bearings. Now, not after a year or buying it. Don't assume those bearings have grease, because they basically don't.

    Here is a picture of one of the bearings

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  2. #2
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    looks like i have found my self another job for today then, already got to service my lyrics and my rear shock, best get moving, thanks for this, i will check it out later if i get time, take it you have just poped the seals out on these bearings after stripping it down? think my remedy will need some new bearings in a few months anyway as a few of them are going notchy,

  3. #3
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    Yes tom, just remove the seals. You shouldn't have any old grease to remove.

    I have 4 or so notchy bearings too (those 3 almost seized and another 1 or 2). But I will not replace them until they feel sloppy. Hopefully they will last some time now that they actually have grease on them.
    Quote Originally Posted by TNC to whining spammer
    Don't let the nose of your saddle hit you in the @#!#X on the way out.

  4. #4
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    tar, just started stripping the bike down now, and found out the headset cane creek have send me as replacement is to small to fit inside the remedy headtube even though it is a 1.5'' headset, i am starting to develop a hate for remedy's at the moment,

  5. #5
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    Is there a step by step on how to do this or is this something recommended for a bike shop or advanced mechanic? Thanks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by ffc3
    Is there a step by step on how to do this or is this something recommended for a bike shop or advanced mechanic? Thanks.
    It can be done by anyone who has got some mechanical knowledge about them, it involves removing the rear swing arm from the bike, then removing the plastic/rubber bearing seals from the bearing on the outerside of the bearing while they are still in the frame, then packing the bearing with grease and putting the seals back on, it isnt that hard to do aslong as you are carefull with the seals.
    This is more of a home mechanic job as a bike shop wouldnt do this for you, they would only be interested in changing the bearings for you,

    Hope this helps,
    Tom,

  7. #7
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    Judging by you question, I wouldn't recommend you to do it. I believe that if you have the skills/tools/self-confidence to do it, it would be evident to you how easy it is.

    But obviously, it is impossible to make an accurate assessment of your skills from one post.

    You need the following tools:
    - 5mm and 10mm hex wrench/bit
    - 22mm spanner
    - needle or other pointy object like a knife to pry open the bearing seals
    - torque wrench (not need but recommended)

    Obviously, you will also need the grease. If you ride in sloppy conditions, use water-proof grease. Regular grease is fine otherwise (that's what I used).

    A syringe to apply the grease is also a good idea (a regular one from a pharmacy is all you need)

    I also recommend you to get blue loctite (thread-locker) for the bolts.

    To avoid losing stuff or forgetting how they are supposed to be assembled, do one pivot at a time, and reassemble before moving to the next pivot. That's what I did.

    A final pointer. The 2 pivots placed in the front triangle have an axle which might require a gentle tap with a rubber mallet to take them out and in.

    That's it. As simple as cake. If you have the tools and you are mechanically inclined.
    Quote Originally Posted by TNC to whining spammer
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  8. #8
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    that was much better written than i could do it amrgb, i can tel you spend a lot of time on here i didnt get around to doing mine today due to servicing forks and shock, will save it for tomoz while the weathers shockingly bad at the moment,

  9. #9
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    Never rode it in the rain! Damn you should have seen the filth I was riding in on saturday....
    Nice post amrgb, I will check that out. Just tried a little bounce test and the pivots were initially a bit sticky. Haven't used the bike since saturday...... :/

  10. #10
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    Some of you guys should try riding in england, trails are always wet most of the year around which makes a nice griding paste for your bearings and drive train

    Did try and get this done today, but i snapped a shock bolt, rounded the other shock bolt, found out my gear outer and brake hose have been worn down by the evo link during riding, and i havnt even got around to stripping down the rear end yet,

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by tombate911
    , but i snapped a shock bolt, rounded the other shock bolt
    Me too! I was just cleaning the bike and took the linkage apart and when putting it back together...snap! One bolt sheered, another is almost rounded.

    How do you remove the seals?
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    Quote Originally Posted by RideFaster
    How do you remove the seals?
    Very carefully you have to get something small like a safety pin or exacto knife under them trying not to damage the seals and pry them out without damaging them.

  13. #13
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    Anyone found this issue with a 2009+ Top Fuel?

  14. #14
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    Can't hurt to have it checked. My brand new 2010 Ex8 has very little grease in it's bearings.

  15. #15
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    I'm sorry for you guys about the bolts. It never came to me to warn about that, since it all went smooth for me. However, I was extra careful since I know those bolts are butter.
    Quote Originally Posted by TNC to whining spammer
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  16. #16
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    Gents - I did this last winter on all the bearings on my Specialized Stumpy FSR. Its fairly common across full susser bikes not not have sufficient grease in the bearings. Although time consuming, once done, your bike feels like a new bike - smooth as butter.

    Also I HIGHLY recommend using a torque wrench when tightening bike suspension components. They are not the strongest when compared to lets say motorcycle or car components, and are manufactured for tolerances according to the TQ specs - ie they are there for a reason.

  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by amrgb
    I'm sorry for you guys about the bolts. It never came to me to warn about that, since it all went smooth for me. However, I was extra careful since I know those bolts are butter.
    mine had been going for a while because i have had the shock on and off a few times so i knew they where like butter, got some new ones on the way from trek this week, i have stripped the rear end down about 5 times now so i think the bolts have become fatigued and worn from being remove and rideen as well etc,

  18. #18
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    Just an FYI, found the source of freeplay in my rear suspension fuel ex 8, the center bolts on both sides of the evo link were lose, one was half a turn and the other a full turn, would likely have sheared bolts off eventually, so check your pivot bolts for tightness.

  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by motard5
    ...Also I HIGHLY recommend using a torque wrench when tightening bike suspension components. They are not the strongest when compared to lets say motorcycle or car components, and are manufactured for tolerances according to the TQ specs - ie they are there for a reason.
    What are the torque specs for the evo link bolts?

  20. #20
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    All torque specs are on the bolts.
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  21. #21
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    I recommend using a good bearing grease I use the Phill wood grease for all my bearing applications. It helped my bottom bracket. I will tackle the rest of my Creak Monster. I had a guy on the trail said Trek had a recall on the rear suspension to locktight it and check torque. I have not had this issue but he did and his was brand new 09 ex just like mine.

  22. #22
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    Last time I checked Trek bearings have a lifetime warranty. Take it to your shop.
    Get out there and ride!

  23. #23
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    Lol, bearings are a wear and tear part.
    Quote Originally Posted by TNC to whining spammer
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  24. #24
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    I took another stab at it today. I took the seals off (box cutter worked well) and sure enough there was virtually nothing there. The bike has been ridden for a year and this was the first time I have looked at the pivots, so it is hard to say if there was nothing there originally. Now there is plenty of grease!
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  25. #25
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    Took mine apart tonight and just have a question I have two silver washers that I don't remember where they came off from. Mine was actually ok but did repack them because they needed a little more grease . They do move better now. BTW thanks for the box cutter trick that worked great.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Remedy, Fuel and other Trek full suspension owners: Check your pivot bearings!-dsc00846.jpg  

    Remedy, Fuel and other Trek full suspension owners: Check your pivot bearings!-dsc00847.jpg  


  26. #26
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    i believe the silver washer goes in the middle, thick black washer goes to the shock and the four black washers go to the back where the seat stays attach.

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    Middle of what? What I do know is the 4 black washers go to the back of the 4 bearings on the back of the top evo suspension (I call this the top part) if I am remembering correctly just 4 black washers for the top. I don't remember the Fox shock having any washers at all. I wish Trek had an online microfiche or something to reference. I reversed my bottom axel by accident because I had it correct the first time but just got turned around after reversing the bike in the stand no harm though.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Remedy, Fuel and other Trek full suspension owners: Check your pivot bearings!-dsc00849.jpg  

    Last edited by Bmann_mtb; 11-26-2009 at 09:03 AM.

  28. #28
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    On my Fuel Ex those washers went behind the center pivot bearings on the Evo link.

    Edit: by behind the bearings I mean between the bearings and the frame mounting holes.

  29. #29
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    mine has 2 thick black washers where the linkage attaches to the shock, the silver washers where the linkage attaches to the seat tube and 4 black washers where the linkage attaches to the seat stays. Yours may differ slightly as mine is a 2010.

  30. #30
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    Mine is a 2009 EX8.. Ok I had 4 black washers that pressed up against the inside of the bearings. So all 4 went to the EVO link. Maybe they went to the back pivots the ones that had the allen head on the inside.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Remedy, Fuel and other Trek full suspension owners: Check your pivot bearings!-dsc00852.jpg  

    Remedy, Fuel and other Trek full suspension owners: Check your pivot bearings!-dsc00853.jpg  


  31. #31
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    I took my Top Fuel into the shop, and had the mechanic check it out. He said most pivots were OK, and there were a couple that could use a bit more grease.

    I had an annoying creak coming from the bottom bracket area before, so hopefully this fixes the noise too.

  32. #32
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    I have got everything back together and have literally re-greased every bearing on the bike. So I should have no more creaks.

  33. #33
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    When you guys removed your rear shock did your swingarm move freely? I took my rear shock off and I can move my swingarm up and down but it stays where I move it ie if I move it up and let go it doesn't drop back down on it's own.

  34. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by arashi
    When you guys removed your rear shock did your swingarm move freely? I took my rear shock off and I can move my swingarm up and down but it stays where I move it ie if I move it up and let go it doesn't drop back down on it's own.

    yes mine moves freely.

  35. #35
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    Mine was ok also. Maybe the bolt was too tight and was binding the bearings?

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bmann_mtb
    Mine was ok also. Maybe the bolt was too tight and was binding the bearings?
    No, it just didn't have much grease in it at all. Also, I must mention that my bike is the R1 rear suspension design and not the Evo Link. There's no bearing in my link, just plastic bushings. I have a 08' Top Fuel 69er. Damn, I wish I had bearings in my rocker arms!

  37. #37
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    I too found my evo link bearings all fouled when I checked this.....the swingarm bearings were also nasty and the whole rear suspension was very tight. Strangely the rear wheel pivot bearings were fine...so I didn't open them up.

    As the OP said..DON'T WAIT!

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bmann_mtb
    Middle of what? What I do know is the 4 black washers go to the back of the 4 bearings on the back of the top evo suspension (I call this the top part) if I am remembering correctly just 4 black washers for the top. I don't remember the Fox shock having any washers at all. I wish Trek had an online microfiche or something to reference. I reversed my bottom axel by accident because I had it correct the first time but just got turned around after reversing the bike in the stand no harm though.
    Dealers DO have access to the service manual with an exploded diagram of all parts and part #' on models from 2006-2009


    Mikey.

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  39. #39
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    But....but.... I have no bearings....

    ....yeah, my Fuel is an OLD one, so it's got the cheap bushings .... can't complain, though (now that I have a few replacement sets....) ...... they work as designed/intended. Still flogging my '01 Fuel 90

  40. #40
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    I decided to tear my Remedy 9 down to the frame over the weekend and found that the pivot bearings feel like sandpaper. Ordered all new bearings today and I'll make sure everything has plenty of grease when reassembling.

  41. #41
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    Hey Guys

    I just picked up a new to me 08 Fuel EX 8 and saw this thread.

    I didn't pull the swing arm off the bike, but I was able to remove each screw individually, pop the seal off the bearing, and push grease into the bearing. None of the bearings were seized, but a couple clicked when you rotated the inner cup, and you could feel it while turning in the bearing. All of them had a small amount of grease, so I did my best to remove the old grease. After re-greasing the bearings they now are all smooth and quite.

    It was easier then I imagined, and took all of a half hour to complete.

    Thanks for the heads up.

    Matt

  42. #42
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    My '09 R9 bearings had plenty o' grease. Only issue were some of the sus bolts were hard to get out of the bearing inner races. I used penetrating oil, then hit them with a brass punch. When I re-assembled, I used ARP assembly lube on the surface of the bolts that interface with the bearings, and the inner surface of the evo link "nuts" need some lube to keep them from sticking to the frame. Anti-sieze would be preferred but I couldn't find it.

  43. #43
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    reassemble rear triangle

    Hi Guys,
    I'm trying to reassemble rear triangle - to check/grease bearings. Some how I'm not able to get apart the rear upper end of triangle (back end of rocker link - see lower picture of Bmann_mtb). I took out bolts, but it's still firmly together?? Any advise? Thanks! Darko

  44. #44
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    The bolts are reverse thread on that part for some reason. Turn them CW to loosen them. Ttyl, Fahn
    Last edited by LarryFahn; 03-31-2010 at 01:09 PM.
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  45. #45
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    "The bolts are reverse thread on that part for some reason"

    Cheeky buggers! No wonder I couldn't get the damn things undone

  46. #46
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    Guys, thanks for this thread and the great pics!

    I recently started noticed an intermittent creak/click noise coming somewhere around the linkages when compressing my rear suspension on my '08 Trek Fuel EX8. I stopped by my LBS before a ride and asked one of the guys to have a listen. I asked if there were any bearings or other bushings that might need lube and the response from was "nope, I wouldn't worry about it." Well, I'm glad I continued my investigation and landed hear

    The last thing I have to do is go pickup a 10MM hex so I can remove the bolts on the lower swingarm and lube the bearing set...I think (hope) that may be my creak/click culprit. It's so hard to tell though.

    PS- Anyone know where to order the replacement bolts? I'm starting to round out one or two of the hex heads.
    Last edited by MysticMyers; 03-26-2010 at 08:32 AM.

  47. #47
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    I must admit I am a bit nervous to do this, but after reading all this there is no way it is not worth doing. I paid far to much money for this bike to let something like this hinder me in any way. I am not completely inept at mechanical things but I saw someone else say they just took each one out individually? Without disassembling anything major and would I be missing something in going that route? I'm at school right now so I am not looking at my bike but I will have it down here in a week or two.

    It is a simple question but thanks in advance for the responses, also, is there a specific grease that is recommended? I remember spotting some garage door grease in my house, never used it on my bike but would that be alright to use?

    thanks again

  48. #48
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    I did that, one pivot at a time (both sides, of course). That wat you minimize the risk of forgetting what goes where or losing something. You won't miss anything vs. disassembling it completely. Go gently on the bolts, since they are made of a soft alloy, and use a torque wrench to assemble them. IMHO, the greatest risk of this operation is rounding the bolts.
    Quote Originally Posted by TNC to whining spammer
    Don't let the nose of your saddle hit you in the @#!#X on the way out.

  49. #49
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    amrgb is right about this, if you do it methodically and lay things in the correct order, put bolts with the correct nuts and washers and parts of the rear end you will be fine, just watch out for the Trek shock bolts as they are made of cheese, i have already gone through a set of them but that was my fault and i did take the shock on and off a lot at one point last year which contributed to that, I would recommend using a good quality set of allen keys for disassembling the rear end,

  50. #50
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    Ok, thanks a lot guys. Any recommendations on grease to use?

  51. #51
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    I used regular wheel bearing grease (a red one). But if you're going to buy, buy a waterproof grease, like Phill Woods. I think that is the one everyone recommends. If you don't ride in the slop or wash your bike, anything will perform about the same.
    Quote Originally Posted by TNC to whining spammer
    Don't let the nose of your saddle hit you in the @#!#X on the way out.

  52. #52
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    I just got an 07 ex 9, is this something I need to be doing?

  53. #53
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    If it's new, no. Ride it until winter, and include this in your winter maintenance.

    If it's used, then yes. If that is the case, it would also be a good idea to service the fork and shock, no matter what the seller told you.
    Quote Originally Posted by TNC to whining spammer
    Don't let the nose of your saddle hit you in the @#!#X on the way out.

  54. #54
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    I just wanted to let you all know that I was in my lbs this weekend, and I asked them what/if I should be greasing my pivot bearings and the owner of the shop, told me not to worry about it and that I didn't have to. They were sealed bearings and when they wear out, all you have to do is pop them out and replace them. Thought that was interesting since everything on here seems to say to do just the opposite.

  55. #55
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    That kind of answer would be enough to make me look elsewhere to spend my money.

    There are only two reasons to say that you shouldn't touch it. One is to safeguard the possibility that you will screw things up. The second is to have them pop the bearings (because you don't have a tool to take them out and in by yourself) and charge you for the service when they inevitably fail.

    If it were the first case, they should have offered to check the bearings. Notice that here I'm assuming that you bought the bike from them.

    Notice that shimano says the same thing abot their bottom brackets. The thing is. The seals are crappy. They don't hold water down that well. On top of that, the bearing are poorly greased with poor quality grease. Grease them liberaly with a good grease regularly and you'll get 3x or more life out of the bearings. You're suppose to replace bearings when they become sloppy, not when they seize. I had a bunch of bearings on my Remedy vritually seized.

    In short: typical LBS BS to rip money from you down the road

    PS: LBS BS might be a redudancy, since LBS essentially stands for Local Bull Sh!t
    Quote Originally Posted by TNC to whining spammer
    Don't let the nose of your saddle hit you in the @#!#X on the way out.

  56. #56
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    Just like everything else, take it with a grain of salt. Working at a LBS doesn't automatically make you an expert and you can come across bad or lazy advise from a "professional" (think SOME auto dealership service departments).

    That said, by all means you can follow their advise. For me, it was easy to do but I'm not sure how much it improved ride quality. I can say that there was little grease in there before, and the bearings clicked when turning them by hand, after, they were buttery smooth.

    To me that was enough to justify the 20 minutes of maintenance time, and I'm pretty confident that I won't have to worry about the bearings any time soon.

    Quote Originally Posted by ThePhizz
    I just wanted to let you all know that I was in my lbs this weekend, and I asked them what/if I should be greasing my pivot bearings and the owner of the shop, told me not to worry about it and that I didn't have to. They were sealed bearings and when they wear out, all you have to do is pop them out and replace them. Thought that was interesting since everything on here seems to say to do just the opposite.

  57. #57
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    Greased my pivots, seat post and headset and no more creaks.

  58. #58
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    Quote Originally Posted by matto0
    Just like everything else, take it with a grain of salt. Working at a LBS doesn't automatically make you an expert and you can come across bad or lazy advise from a "professional" (think SOME auto dealership service departments).

    That said, by all means you can follow their advise. For me, it was easy to do but I'm not sure how much it improved ride quality. I can say that there was little grease in there before, and the bearings clicked when turning them by hand, after, they were buttery smooth.

    To me that was enough to justify the 20 minutes of maintenance time, and I'm pretty confident that I won't have to worry about the bearings any time soon.

    No you are absolutely right, and I figured I'd cut out any confusion and just asked trek themselves, who said, pretty plainly that if they are already greased i don't have to worry, and if they aren't, then grease them.

    And you are of course right about the lbs thing it was just disheartening because up until this point I had felt like it was a place I could really trust and put a lot of faith in. I will certainly just be a bit more wary of their advice now is all.

  59. #59
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    I also examined all my pivot bearings in my 08 ex7 with all being dry/rusty and 2 completely frozen.

    NOTE: When replacing the ABP cap bolts, be sure not to overtighten. The dropout will break off and be stuck in your frame and the replacement is a special order. Don't ask me how i know...

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by krue
    Greased my pivots, seat post and headset and no more creaks.

    Do I really need to take the headset off after all this to grease that too??!

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    To toss one more Fuel story on this thread pile - I'm still rolling on a Top Fuel 98 2005 and my bushings (not bearings) finally need to be replaced. I took the bike to my fav LBS (non-Trek dealership) to help in the tear down so I could identify which bushings needed to be replaced which turns out to just be the main bottom pivot point. After a frustrating trip to a local Trek LBS falsely claiming to have replacement bushings, I contacted Trek directly. Trek is taking very good care of me and sending me the parts for free. That's great customer service.

    Cheers,
    Mike

  62. #62
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    The manual said not to grease the bearings. I had them done anyway.

  63. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by alias33
    Do I really need to take the headset off after all this to grease that too??!
    I did mine because it was creaking.

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by lexvil
    The manual said not to grease the bearings. I had them done anyway.
    Did the same to my 2005 Trek EX 8, the creaks sounds are down to a quarter to what they were. I ride the muddy trails of New Hampshire and wash my bike often. The bearings on most the pivot points had been wet at some.point and had some rust and crud in them.

    Thanks for giving me the motivation to do this.

  65. #65
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    What bearings are contained within the two shock ends? I greased the ABP and the swingarm pivot bearings and the evo bearings. The only thing left is the shock ends but not sure what bearings are in there, must be needle bearings?

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    I'm a bit confused I guess. How much do the bearings cost? In most other sports, those bearings are usually so cheap that the labor of greasing them ends up costing more than a replacement... Also the balls inside can wear down screwing up the tolerances.

    Are these bearings some non-standard size, specific to trek? If so, I would understand they could be costly. Although I assume I could just ask Trek for some new ones and through the warranty get them for free.

  67. #67
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    I don't believe you'll get anywhere with Trek on this from a warranty standpoint, since riding conditions greatly effect how long your pivot bearings last. It's a fairly easy DIY job to add more grease to the newer bearings so that you don't have to buy new ones as soon.

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    Anyone know how much a full set of new pivot bearings would cost?

  69. #69
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    Removing the old bearings and pressing new ones is the problem here. They won't provide you the tool. You'll have to improvise or look for tools that work on this bike.

    If you had to pay to grease the bearings, probably it would cost you nearly as much as replacing them. But we're not talking about paying someone else to do it, we're talking about doing it ourselves.
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  70. #70
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gromit_dog
    Just an FYI, found the source of freeplay in my rear suspension fuel ex 8, the center bolts on both sides of the evo link were lose, one was half a turn and the other a full turn, would likely have sheared bolts off eventually, so check your pivot bolts for tightness.
    I just found a loose center bolt on my non-drive side EVO link today ('10 EX9). Everything else was tight. I'll be planning to check all my bearings after reading this thread.

  71. #71
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    [email protected] I have and 2010 Fuel Ex9. Probably not even a 100 miles on it and all the bushings except the lower ones next to the crank barely had any grease on them. I happened to see this post while I was changing the seals on my RP23 so I checked the bearings while I was at it and thank God I did.

    You know what? Its bull that you pay so much for high quality bikes but when you take a good look at the parts they seem to be half @ssed. I did a oil change on my Fox F120 FIT RLC and I found one of those mettalic bands that go around the dust wipers just chillin in the bottom of the fork with what looked like 2 pieces of transperant tape. Way to go Fox and the quality assurance team.
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  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by chtorres2
    [email protected] I have and 2010 Fuel Ex9. Probably not even a 100 miles on it and all the bushings except the lower ones next to the crank barely had any grease on them. I happened to see this post while I was changing the seals on my RP23 so I checked the bearings while I was at it and thank God I did.

    You know what? Its bull that you pay so much for high quality bikes but when you take a good look at the parts they seem to be half @ssed. I did a oil change on my Fox F120 FIT RLC and I found one of those mettalic bands that go around the dust wipers just chillin in the bottom of the fork with what looked like 2 pieces of transperant tape. Way to go Fox and the quality assurance team.
    Hey chtorres, any tips you can give for a first timer checking all the bushings? Such as, things to avoid so I don't break anything

  73. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by mightymouse
    Hey chtorres, any tips you can give for a first timer checking all the bushings? Such as, things to avoid so I don't break anything

    Sure bro!!!!!

    AMRGB said it best:


    You need the following tools:
    - 5mm and 10mm hex wrench/bit
    - 22mm spanner
    - needle or other pointy object like a knife to pry open the bearing seals
    - torque wrench (not need but recommended)

    Obviously, you will also need the grease. If you ride in sloppy conditions, use water-proof grease. Regular grease is fine otherwise (that's what I used).

    A syringe to apply the grease is also a good idea (a regular one from a pharmacy is all you need)

    I also recommend you to get blue loctite (thread-locker) for the bolts.

    To avoid losing stuff or forgetting how they are supposed to be assembled, do one pivot at a time, and reassemble before moving to the next pivot. That's what I did.

    A final pointer. The 2 pivots placed in the front triangle have an axle which might require a gentle tap with a rubber mallet to take them out and in".



    I would also recommend a torque wrench. Yes its a couple of bucckes but Sette make a good cheaper one that you can buy at pricepoint.com. If your going to buy it get the http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/153...que-Wrench.htm 1/4 drive torque wrench. I have both of them but the bigger one you wont usse at all.

    Why a torque wrench you might say? Because those pivot screws are crappy and will round outt or break if tighten to much (dont ask me how I know).

    As for how to get the blue rubber caps off the bushing its easy. Use a really small and thin flat head screwdriver like the ones you use for glasses. Someone can correct me if im wrong but I found its easier to pry the rubber seal out from the inside part of the bearing (the round part that moves) without doing any damage or leaving any marks. Remember you do not have to get the bearings out of the bike to service. You want to really pack them with a high quality bearing grease like Parks or Finish Line. Dont be shy in applying grease and use a syringe. Its cheap and itll make your life easier. Any excess will come out when you put the bearing rubber cap back on. You can use a socket for that. Hand pressure will do to put the blue rubber cap back on. DONT USE A HAMMER!!!!!!. They barley need any force to fall in place.

    Do each bearing individually except for the rear bearings which youell need to take both pivot screws off to service. I used a rubber mallot TO G E N T L E Y loosen the rear end. Be caarefull. There are 2 spacer in the inside and to spacers in thee outside wear the rear en meets the rocker.

    The ABP pivots ( the ones that are in the rear were the rear wheel quick release is) are easy to service. Again one at a time.

    The bottom bearings ( the ones near the front deraileur and crank) can be serviced but the only one that can be done with out taking the crank off is the non crank side. You need a wrench to hold the cap in place and a hex wrench bit to loosen the bolt. Really easy stuff.

    Remember if you dont have a torque wrench just tighten it snug and put lock tight on it. I cant stress on hoow flimsy the pivot bolts are.


    One more recomendation. If your rear shock is almost due for seal replacement which is at an exagerated 30hrs you might want to do that while your at it.

    Greasing the bushings plus the seal change made my EX9 feel a lot nicer. Usually when I would do the sag on the rear shock I could never get an accurate sag because each time it was different even though I made sure I wasnt making the bike bob while mounting and dismounting. It would change by 5-10% each time. Now no matter what it gives me the same accurate sag.

    I really want to give props to AMRGB for sharing with us his problem with the bearings. I think a lot of us are going to enjoy our rides and our wallets because of him
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  74. #74
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    I just did the 6 bearings on the EVO link. only 2 had a reasonable amount of grease inside. The other 4 were almost dry & didn't turn too smoothly.

    Pretty poor quality bearings they used on these bikes, sad really.

  75. #75
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    Hey guys! I finally went for a ride today after repacking the bearings and I can really feel the difference in the rear end of the bike. Feels a lot smoother then before. I also changes the seals on the RP23 and added a bit more float fluid the recommended. I dont understand why Fox says not to put in more then a the amount of the size of a dime in the sleeve because the excess fluid will make the shock get dirtier. I put some more then the recommended (probably double) amount plus I really lubed up the seals a lot. I road today and the shock looks normal. No excess dirt or oily residue. Im pretty sure that the new smooth feeling my bike got is from both of those tuneups. By the way the sir pressue is set the same as before.
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  76. #76
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    2010 Ex 9

    serviced the bearings last night (after going to the store to locate the blue loctite) following all your directions and using plenty of Phil's. I have about 400 miles on the bike since April, and I found all of my EVO link bearings had a higher quality blue colored grease in them than the cheap looking clear paste-like stuff I've seen before. All of the bolts were still tight, and had blue loctite on the threads from original assembly. 2 of the 6 EVO's had less blue grease than I would like to see, and had a bit of grit that I cleaned out by flushing with Phil's grease a few times, but none were dry and all spun easily. The ABP bearings were clean and smooth with good stock blue grease as well. The bottom front swingarm bearing was the only bearing with the cheap clear grease, and it had very little inside.

    One thing that had me confused and I would like to clarify with you guys was the comment about reverse threading for the two rear EVO link to upper swingarm connection bolts. If I insert the allen wrench from the outside of the EVO link, just like I did for the other EVO link bolts, my bolts were not reverse threaded. Now, the allen threads are on the inner side of the EVO link for these bolts (about an inch recessed from the head of the bolt), so if you have to insert your allen wrench from the inner side of the EVO link, the bolts are reverse threaded from that direction. Maybe this is not what you guys meant, or maybe the threading has changed for the 2010 EX.

    Anyway, that's what I found. I was pleasantly surprised with the results. Thanks for the tips.

  77. #77
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    For those other 2010 EX owners, I obtained this helpful diagram with part numbers.

    Remedy, Fuel and other Trek full suspension owners: Check your pivot bearings!-2010fuelexalumdrcv.jpg

    Cheers

  78. #78
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    Thanks for this.

    Can someone verify that these parts will work? I'm not sure about the spanner. Also, the syringe seems to draw in from the point. Would I need one that fills from the plunger end?

    Phill Wood waterproof grease (or Parks or Finish Line)
    http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/113...oof-Grease.htm

    Blue Loc-Tite
    http://www.amazon.com/Loctite-Thread.../dp/B0002KKTHW

    10mm hex wrench
    http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/146...Hex-Wrench.htm

    Torque wrench converter to hex
    http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/153...que-Wrench.htm

    syringe
    http://www.amazon.com/Monoject-Oral-.../dp/B001AIKUZG

    22mm Spanner
    http://www.pricepoint.com/detail/173...anner-Tool.htm
    Last edited by Ferdball; 12-03-2010 at 03:11 PM.

  79. #79
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    Do you guys have any more pics to put up as I would love to see exactly what it looks like. If I just bought a 2010 ex7 should this be something I would do?

  80. #80
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    The funny thing is, most likely those bearings would run for years with no grease. The reason being is that they do not spin for the most part, and most likely never generate heat from movement. I agree that they should have grease, as I have also greased mine, but they would probably last just as long without it! Should Trek have greased them , PROBABLY, but as I said they would probably function correctly for years to come as they are.

  81. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by nov0798
    The funny thing is, most likely those bearings would run for years with no grease. The reason being is that they do not spin for the most part, and most likely never generate heat from movement. I agree that they should have grease, as I have also greased mine, but they would probably last just as long without it! Should Trek have greased them , PROBABLY, but as I said they would probably function correctly for years to come as they are.
    You quickly lose suspension performance on ungreased pivot bearings if you ride in the rain, mud, snow, and other dirty conditions. With grease, I get two full years on a set. Without grease, within a month the pivot bearings start to feel rough and pit out quickly, slowly seizing up.

  82. #82
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    Did the EVO link. Pretty easy. I've never removed a crank before. Any tips or special tools needed?

  83. #83
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    Depends what kind of crank you have

  84. #84
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    Stock 2008 Fuel EX8 - Shimano XT.

  85. #85
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    Is it the hollowtech crank?

  86. #86
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    If its the hollowtech, you do the following
    1. Loosen, and remove the 2 pinch bolts on the left crank arm.
    2. Use this tool to loosen the star looking thing on the left hand crank arm.
    https://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl...t:429,r:10,s:0
    3. Once that is removed, slide off the crank arm.
    4. Remove crank from the right side of the bike, it just simply pulls out. Of course you will need to raise the derailer to the highest position, and move the chain, but other than that it just slides out.

    When reinstalling,
    1. reinsert the crank
    2, install the crank arm, but leave it loose
    3. tighten that nut hand tight using the tool
    4. torgue down the crank arm bolts.

    This also might help

    https://www.parktool.com/blog/repair.../crank-service

  87. #87
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    Yeah, Hollowtech. Thanks. I guess I'll need a tool to get this off. It wasn't mentioned in the OP, so I wonder if they needed it.

  88. #88
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    Sorry, its an LX Hollowtech. I guess the removal part is the same.






  89. #89
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    Just go to the bike shop, they might have one lying around. I got mine from REI. My REI has always had these random little tools lying around. I think when they assemble peoples bikes, these tools come with them, but they figure that an average owner will never use it.

  90. #90
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    The last one was a pain in the ass. Not only do you have to remove the crank and shock, but you have to drop the derailleur too.




  91. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by mightymouse
    For those other 2010 EX owners, I obtained this helpful diagram with part numbers.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	2010fuelexalumdrcv.jpg 
Views:	16788 
Size:	234.4 KB 
ID:	560361

    Cheers

    Wish I had this last year nice diagram!

  92. #92
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    Ferd,

    that tool is about 25 bucks and wholly unnecessary. Pressing your thumb against it while back-pedaling the cranks might be sufficient. If not, a pair of needle nose pliers, shallowly inserted, spread open and unscrewed will get the preload bolt out. It doesn't need a lot of torque.

  93. #93
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    I am picking up a new 2010 Remedy 9.8. Is this something I need to do right away? Necessary with this bike?

  94. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by jochribs
    Ferd,

    that tool is about 25 bucks and wholly unnecessary. Pressing your thumb against it while back-pedaling the cranks might be sufficient. If not, a pair of needle nose pliers, shallowly inserted, spread open and unscrewed will get the preload bolt out. It doesn't need a lot of torque.
    I'm not sure what "it" is, but if you mean that big black pivot bolt, then yes. It did come out easy, but only after I moved my derailleur. There was no way that was coming out otherwise.

    Also, with my Hollowtech crank, the crank tool and the spanner is unnecessary. Could have saved about $22 there.

  95. #95
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ferdball
    I'm not sure what "it" is, but if you mean that big black pivot bolt, then yes. It did come out easy, but only after I moved my derailleur. There was no way that was coming out otherwise.

    Also, with my Hollowtech crank, the crank tool and the spanner is unnecessary. Could have saved about $22 there.
    Yes, by "IT" I was referring to the plastic crank preload bolt. There isn't much to the disassembly of these fuels. Rather straight forward.

  96. #96
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    Quote Originally Posted by nov0798
    The funny thing is, most likely those bearings would run for years with no grease. The reason being is that they do not spin for the most part, and most likely never generate heat from movement. I agree that they should have grease, as I have also greased mine, but they would probably last just as long without it! Should Trek have greased them , PROBABLY, but as I said they would probably function correctly for years to come as they are.
    Im with you on that. I dont think a bearing could even seize given the amount of suspension forces. Possible, but unlikely.

    In our application, more is not necessarily better. Bearings will run on light oil. For slow speed high force situations, a light grease coating will suffice. Too much grease turns the bearing into a dust trap.

    Last time i rebuilt my rear shock, the rear suspension had zero bind.

  97. #97
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    Maybe so, but it would take a lot more forces to make the suspension move. Mine started to feel like a hardtail, but it did move. After repacking, it feels like new and is absorbing bumps like it should.

  98. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ferdball
    Maybe so, but it would take a lot more forces to make the suspension move. Mine started to feel like a hardtail, but it did move. After repacking, it feels like new and is absorbing bumps like it should.
    Exactly. The idea that "these things will probably run for years without grease" is silly. Sure, they may not seize up, but their performance will be severely reduced as soon as they have no grease and they get a little water in them. Those bearings may not spin at high rpm, but they must move without resistance to respond to the sudden impacts, meaning it's just as important they are smooth.

  99. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by mightymouse
    Exactly. The idea that "these things will probably run for years without grease" is silly. Sure, they may not seize up, but their performance will be severely reduced as soon as they have no grease and they get a little water in them. Those bearings may not spin at high rpm, but they must move without resistance to respond to the sudden impacts, meaning it's just as important they are smooth.


    I can understand that some guys want to take extra special care of their bikes. Thats good. However, bearings are greased at the bearing factory. I never said you should run them dry. They are not packed full because packed bearings cause more problems than lightly greased ones. It may look good to some, but the only grease that is of any use, is the one on the surface of the ball bearing. It may sound silly to the uninitiated, but packing a bearing full of grease is just plain ignorant. Grease holds dirt and water. Mo grease, mo crap.

    Ive taken the whole system apart, and the suspension, without the shock falls rapidly under its own weight. Put in the shock and the du bushing causes a bit of bind. You can get rid of that with a roller bearing kit, but you can also dial down the dampening. Yeah, right, the du adds a little dampening. Horror of horrors. Guess what, packed bearings add a bit of dampening too.

    Check for bind each time you service the shock (shock off the bike, every 30 hours). Blast the bearing with an appropriate cleaner and lightly grease. Using a screw driver, you can spin a bearing and feel if it has play or is rough after cleaning. To crack them open when new might just destroy the seals.
    Last edited by bing!; 02-13-2011 at 11:13 AM.

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    Double post. Deleted.

  101. #101
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    Quote Originally Posted by bing!
    I can understand that some guys want to take extra special care of their bikes. Thats good. However, bearings are greased at the bearing factory. I never said you should run them dry. They are not packed full because packed bearings cause more problems than lightly greased ones. It may look good to some, but the only grease that is of any use, is the one on the surface of the ball bearing. It may sound silly to the uninitiated, but packing a bearing full of grease is just plain ignorant. Grease holds dirt and water. Mo grease, mo crap.

    Ive taken the whole system apart, and the suspension, without the shock falls rapidly under its own weight. Put in the shock and the du bushing causes a bit of bind. You can get rid of that with a roller bearing kit, but you can also dial down the dampening. Yeah, right, the du adds a little dampening. Horror of horrors. Guess what, packed bearings add a bit of dampening too.

    Check for bind each time you service the shock. Blast the bearing with an appropriate cleaner and lightly grease. To crack them open when new just destroys the seals.
    the thread is titled check your pivot bearings, because many people have found theirs stock from the factory with little or no grease in them. You're right, nobody should "pack the bearings", but they need more than what many are coming with. Of the bearings on my EX, half looked well greased, half had almost none.

  102. #102
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    Just in case you want to replace the bearings, here is a complete list of availability based on the diagram on this thread.

    go to jenson and get them at an average of about 7 bucks each for ABI sealed cartridge bearings. Use the 6900, 6901 and 6903 ref bearing codes on the diagram.

    http://www.jensonusa.com/store/produ...e+Bearing.aspx

    61 dollars worth of bearings. I wouldnt open these bearings when new either. To check, you can spin bearings on your fingers and if it feels dry, then do what you must. Dry is when they spin forever. Smooth and silky is good to go.
    Last edited by bing!; 02-13-2011 at 12:03 PM.

  103. #103
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    Quote Originally Posted by bing!
    I can understand that some guys want to take extra special care of their bikes. Thats good. However, bearings are greased at the bearing factory. I never said you should run them dry. They are not packed full because packed bearings cause more problems than lightly greased ones. It may look good to some, but the only grease that is of any use, is the one on the surface of the ball bearing. It may sound silly to the uninitiated, but packing a bearing full of grease is just plain ignorant. Grease holds dirt and water. Mo grease, mo crap.

    Ive taken the whole system apart, and the suspension, without the shock falls rapidly under its own weight. Put in the shock and the du bushing causes a bit of bind. You can get rid of that with a roller bearing kit, but you can also dial down the dampening. Yeah, right, the du adds a little dampening. Horror of horrors. Guess what, packed bearings add a bit of dampening too.

    Check for bind each time you service the shock (shock off the bike, every 30 hours). Blast the bearing with an appropriate cleaner and lightly grease. Using a screw driver, you can spin a bearing and feel if it has play or is rough after cleaning. To crack them open when new might just destroy the seals.
    Jesus man, you almost make it sound like a greased bearing is better than a bone dry rusty bearing.

    Have you bothered to check the pictures on this thread. You don't see "lightly greased" bearings. At best you see bone dry almost seized bearings (mine) or rusty bearings (a few posts above yours).

    The problem with lightly greased bearings is that the small amount of grease will get squeezed out the bearings' path, meaning no lube. And if dirt and water does get past the seals, having excess grease will work as a barrier. It certainly is not going to be worse than having no grease in there (at worst the bearings will be lubed with a mix of grease with dirty water, instead of just with dirty water).
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    Quote Originally Posted by amrgb

    Have you bothered to check the pictures on this thread. You don't see "lightly greased" bearings. At best you see bone dry almost seized bearings (mine) or rusty bearings (a few posts above yours).

    The problem with lightly greased bearings is that the small amount of grease will get squeezed out the bearings' path, meaning no lube. And if dirt and water does get past the seals, having excess grease will work as a barrier. It certainly is not going to be worse than having no grease in there (at worst the bearings will be lubed with a mix of grease with dirty water, instead of just with dirty water).
    First of all, I am not arguing. What you feel is best for you, is great. Thats what matters in the end. I am sharing my opinion on the matter.

    A lightly greased bearing when new appears almost dry, with the faintest hint of filming. Some grease will pool at the races. The dirty bearings Ive seen hear appear to have caked dirt where the grease has pooled.

    It is not true that grease is pushed aside when a bearing spins. That is not how lubricant behaves. Even if you pack a bearing, if lubricant is pushed aside, nothing will make it flow back into the race again. It is squeezed out. Again, the only grease that matters, is whats coating the ball bearing. Grease is not like motor oil, it does not refresh surfaces by splashing.

    I did see the pictures here, didnt see rust, I did see dirt accumulation, which is to be expected from bad seals. All bicycle bearings are stainless, if it does rust, it will be a rust stain (stainless does this), not crusting. None issue.

    If you clean a dirty bearing, whose seals are far gone, it will only take a couple of rides to get them to the same dirty state again.

    What I would do, check your bearings by spinning them on your fingers. If they feel good, leave them alone.

    If you open a bearing, you might as well clean and lube it. But if theyre are chock full of dirt, the seals are toast and youre better off buying yourself a new one as preventive maintenance. If they feel rough, fresh greaase is only a cosmetic fix. They will go back to being rough after the first ride. 15 bucks for a pair aint so bad. Replacing bearings wont necessarily be all at once. But I would recommend for you to change both side of the same pivot. Check your bearings every shock service, this serves to catch a bad bearing and a loose retainer.

    You can change bearings with some sockets and a small vise. I havent done the ones on the frame, you may need an automotive bearing puller for that one.

    If you dont mind a shorter maintenance schedule, you can keep lubing your bearings. That works good too.

    Regards.
    Last edited by bing!; 02-13-2011 at 12:37 PM.

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    well said Bing

  106. #106
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    Quote Originally Posted by bing!
    It is not true that grease is pushed aside when a bearing spins.
    That's not what I've seen whenever I open a bearing that is low on grease. There is always some grease on the seals, but not on the actual bearings.

    But you're right, in theory you'd want the grease on the bearings and only on the bearings. In practice it gets squeezed out after some time.
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  107. #107
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    Quote Originally Posted by amrgb
    That's not what I've seen whenever I open a bearing that is low on grease. There is always some grease on the seals, but not on the actual bearings.

    But you're right, in theory you'd want the grease on the bearings and only on the bearings. In practice it gets squeezed out after some time.
    Thats the thing. A bearing packed with grease will have the extra grease on the side and the friction surfaces will have an almost invisible film, same as a bearing that you say is "low" on grease. That is the grease that is working. Not the stuff on the seals.

    The bearings youve seen that you say have "no" grease, I suspect has it but are slightly infiltrated with dust making the inside "not shiny". You can tell a bearing that has no grease. When you spin it, it sounds like a roller skate.

    The almost invisible film on the bearing is all you need, and thats what the factory puts. But if you feel that a lot of grease works for you, then do what feels right.

    My take, if the bearing takes on dirt, youre efforts are better served buying new bearings with a new rubber seal.

  108. #108
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    bearing kits and Ti bolts

    in case anyone is interested RWS who sells enduro fork seals and bearings have the trek fuel bearing kits that have all the necessary bearings for $48+shipping. if you havent heard their bearings have an excellent reputation for their seals. i am not affiliated with this shop/website in any way but have had a good experience.

    i also rounded off and broke a couple bolts too like some of the other posters here. i said f-this and ordered some Ti bolts for the upper and lower shock mount from Toronto cycles so i can take the whole thing apart again when i want without worrying about rounding and snapping. now that i see the diagram someone posted i may try to find Ti replacements for the rest of the bolts as well. they are cheaper than replacement alum ones from Trek too. i dont have them yet but i can report how they work out if anyone cares.

  109. #109
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    Quote Originally Posted by bing!
    Thats the thing. A bearing packed with grease will have the extra grease on the side and the friction surfaces will have an almost invisible film, same as a bearing that you say is "low" on grease. That is the grease that is working. Not the stuff on the seals.

    The bearings youve seen that you say have "no" grease, I suspect has it but are slightly infiltrated with dust making the inside "not shiny". You can tell a bearing that has no grease. When you spin it, it sounds like a roller skate.

    The almost invisible film on the bearing is all you need, and thats what the factory puts. But if you feel that a lot of grease works for you, then do what feels right.

    My take, if the bearing takes on dirt, youre efforts are better served buying new bearings with a new rubber seal.
    The reason bearings are not packed is simple - they are made for continous full rotation. No need to worry about excessive friction from the movement on a bicycle suspension. I pack em up from the get go and have never lost a bearing due to a seal failure or lack of lube . My don't touch em buddies can't say the same.

  110. #110
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    So how would I remove the bearings from teh EVO link? Bing mentioned above that it could be done with a vice and sockets. I'm contemplating swaping out to Enduro cartridges.

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    getting them out is not usually an issue, since if you damage them it's like, oh well. Getting them back in is where you need to be careful to press them in evenly with pressure on the rim of the cartridge, hence using a vice and a socket to provide even perpendicular pressure to the frame.

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    Will the diagram mightymouse posted basically apply to the '09 ex models as well? Or how could I go about getting that chart?

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    Quote Originally Posted by magarnigel
    Will the diagram mightymouse posted basically apply to the '09 ex models as well? Or how could I go about getting that chart?
    Yes i have the 09 and it is exact from what i can tell. I have had mine apart and wish i had the diagram when i put mine back together so I remember the resemble very well since I had two washer left over and had to do it all over again.

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    I have a 2010 Top Fuel 9.9. Have removed the aluminium caps on the Evo link today. I managed of course to break because bolts on rear pivot is fastned anti clockwise........

    Anway after removing the caps, I cant see any bearings to grease? Is the Evo linkage for Top Fuel a bearing free setup? Why, to save weight?

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    They aren't counterclockwise. There are also no "caps". You aren't seeing the bearings because they are underneath in one instance, and pressed into the inside of the rocker in the other.

    There aren't bearings where the rocker joins the shock. If you want to access the bearings, you need to undo the hex bolt and pivot sleeve/nut that "rock" the link. Unfasten the hex nuts that attach the seatstays to the rocker. Unfasten the nut and bolt that fasten the upper shock eye to the rocker.

    Keep the shock from swinging down and wacking the downtube. Meaning carefully place it against the downtube. The same goes for the seatstays at the rear. Stick some rags in the junctions of the seatstays and chainstays so that they don't pinch together. When they are released from the rocker, they have the tendency to do jus that.

    If you have broken the nut on the rocker/frame junction, you were turning it the wrong way. It is very easy to remove. It has a little "wing" on the non-drive side flange to allow tightening and loosing. If you broke that off, you are going to be in for some fun removing that.

    I'd say you better bring it to a shop. You'll need a new nut/bolt anyway.

    If you do manage to get this stuff off, you'll see bearings pressed into the frame, as well as bearings pressed into the rear end of the rocker. Pay attention to the parts that come out, their order, and their orientation (which way they face)

    Good luck. I can take pics of the hardware for you if you need, but I urge you to bring it in to a shop instead.

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    I found the bearings now. The guy who did this in 10 minutes must be superman :-)

    I have greased all bearings now and I feel immediately that the rear suspension feels much more smoother. Have to order a new bolt tomorrow, actually I will buy two so I got one in reserve.

    Jochribs, thanks for your help.

  117. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by frafoss
    Have to order a new bolt tomorrow, actually I will buy two so I got one in reserve.
    i never considered myself ham fisted but i was breaking or stripping the the ridiculously soft bolts too even with a torque wrench and a solid hex socket. i ordered one bolt and after seeing the replacement pricing from trek i went and ordered some Ti bolts for the upper and lower shock mounts for about half the cost.

    after getting them installed and seeing how much more solid they are i am realizing that i should have replaced all the other bolts with Ti ones to make it easier to disassemble while i was at it. i am working on finding the right Ti bolt sizing to order as we speak to do so as i know it is only a matter of time before i have to take it apart again and more soft alum bolts get stripped or broken.

    anyone who has had problems with the alum bolts (which seems to be anyone that has laid a tool on them) should seriously consider this IMO.

    crappy iphone pic but you get the point.


  118. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by frafoss
    I found the bearings now. The guy who did this in 10 minutes must be superman :-)

    I have greased all bearings now and I feel immediately that the rear suspension feels much more smoother. Have to order a new bolt tomorrow, actually I will buy two so I got one in reserve.

    Jochribs, thanks for your help.
    don't forget to reapply some blue loctite when you properly torque the bolts back in.

  119. #119
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    Quote Originally Posted by frafoss
    I found the bearings now. The guy who did this in 10 minutes must be superman :-)

    I have greased all bearings now and I feel immediately that the rear suspension feels much more smoother. Have to order a new bolt tomorrow, actually I will buy two so I got one in reserve.

    Jochribs, thanks for your help.
    No problem frafoss. And I may have mis-spoken about the sleeve/nut having a wing on it. The '09' top fuels had that. The rocker actually had a casted register for it to keep it from turning.

    I now have an '11 9.9, and it no longer has that, so maybe your '10 didn't either. If it did though, you've stripped that out of the rocker most likely, and I'd check with Trek or your local shop to see if you can use the newer 'hex on both sides' bolt/nut, or you may consider a new rocker as well. I don't see of the top of my head why the newer hardware wouldn't work with the older rocker though. Ask to be sure.

    Take your time, use a torque wrench, and tools (hex wrenches) that are in good condition. Speed comes with experience in wrenching.

    Honkonbobo, for the life of me, I can not figure out how you (or anyone else) is screwing theirs up. I don't mean to be condescending, but you are doing something wrong, man. I have dissasmbled and assembled mine multiple times for maintenance and upgrades without even the slightest of issues.

    Never stripped a darned thing. If you are screwing up the parts, then you need to stop and think about what you are doing. You are doing something wrong. Maybe you should hide your hands around Christmas time?

    ^^sorry about that last line, I couldn't help myself! LMAO! It's meant to be light hearted.

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    Here is how it looks on my 2010 9.9. I think its the same as for the 2011.


  121. #121
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    here is my advice to you all "stop ya whinging and go play golf instead....."

  122. #122
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    Quote Originally Posted by jochribs
    Honkonbobo, for the life of me, I can not figure out how you (or anyone else) is screwing theirs up. I don't mean to be condescending, but you are doing something wrong, man. I have dissasmbled and assembled mine multiple times for maintenance and upgrades without even the slightest of issues.

    Never stripped a darned thing. If you are screwing up the parts, then you need to stop and think about what you are doing. You are doing something wrong. Maybe you should hide your hands around Christmas time?

    ^^sorry about that last line, I couldn't help myself! LMAO! It's meant to be light hearted.
    like i said i never considered myself ham fisted. all i got is that i am not alone and there are lots of others saying the same thing. even the shop i talked to said they were breaking them.

    this was also part of my secret plan to prove i was useless and not have to do anymore DYI projects at home. you only have to shrink one of her sweaters before you dont have to do laundry anymore...

  123. #123
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    Quote Originally Posted by honkonbobo
    like i said i never considered myself ham fisted. all i got is that i am not alone and there are lots of others saying the same thing. even the shop i talked to said they were breaking them.

    this was also part of my secret plan to prove i was useless and not have to do anymore DYI projects at home. you only have to shrink one of her sweaters before you dont have to do laundry anymore...
    With a 'go get em' outlook like that, you won't have too long before someone else is working on your lady too. Just ragging on you.

    The guys at the shop are breaking them? Baffled.

  124. #124
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    Quote Originally Posted by frafoss
    Here is how it looks on my 2010 9.9. I think its the same as for the 2011.

    I see now what you meant by caps. It's basically a nut. You want to be careful there. That half square/half round nut is seated in carbon that is a relief of the same shape. I can't see from the pic, but hopefully you didn't screw up the carbon there. There is a fair amount of force on the end of the stay as it goes through the upward thrust. Damaging that wouldn't be the best scenario.

    Like I said, just take your time, and think about what you are doing before you do it. Taking these bikes apart, is really straightforward...BUT if you are struggling, there is no shame in bringing the bike to someone who does. Ask them to show you. When I workrd as a mech, I had absolutely no problem helping people understand their bikes. If the shop you go to is a bunch of wangs with omnipotent attitudes, tell em to F-off, and take your bike somewhere else. It's a common ill in the shop world, unfortunately, but it's not like that everywhere.

    Alternatively, you could get a job at a shop, and learn that way too.

    Just don't go reading this thread and end up costing yourself money and greif over something that is probably questionable in how necessary it was to do in the first place.

    You'll get it.

    And make sure you have a torque wrench. You'll need two for this bike. A 25-250 in-lb. Craftsman will do just about all you need on this bike, although you'll need a bigger one for stuff like your centerlock rotors and cassette lock ring etc. They need 40Nm which is around 340 or so in-lbs.
    Last edited by jochribs; 03-14-2011 at 08:47 PM.

  125. #125
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    Quote Originally Posted by jochribs
    With a 'go get em' outlook like that, you won't have too long before someone else is working on your lady too. Just ragging on you.

    The guys at the shop are breaking them? Baffled.

    whoa no wonder so many threads end the way they do here.

  126. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by honkonbobo
    whoa no wonder so many threads end the way they do here.
    curious as to what that means...

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    welcome to the internets

  128. #128
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    yes, the land where the simple becomes confounding, and even shop guys are mangling easily removable parts.

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    the same problem with the washers!!!!

    What do I do with silver washers from evo link? I don't even know where the came from?!!! Did you put them back? The only amazing thing is there's no cracking sound in the suspension after they had come off the link.

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    the same problem with the washers!!!!

    Quote Originally Posted by Bmann_mtb View Post
    Middle of what? What I do know is the 4 black washers go to the back of the 4 bearings on the back of the top evo suspension (I call this the top part) if I am remembering correctly just 4 black washers for the top. I don't remember the Fox shock having any washers at all. I wish Trek had an online microfiche or something to reference. I reversed my bottom axel by accident because I had it correct the first time but just got turned around after reversing the bike in the stand no harm though.

    Whadn did you do with the washers? Did you put them back, if yes where? Between thee evo link and frame or bolt and evo link? Yhx for help

  131. #131
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    On the 09 the four washers went on the inside part which u cannot see unless u take it back apart.

  132. #132
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    Honkonbobo: where did you get the Ti bolts from, and what size are them?, or do you have a part number?, after a year I decided to regrease the bearings and stripped the lower bolt , thanks

    Quote Originally Posted by honkonbobo View Post
    i never considered myself ham fisted but i was breaking or stripping the the ridiculously soft bolts too even with a torque wrench and a solid hex socket. i ordered one bolt and after seeing the replacement pricing from trek i went and ordered some Ti bolts for the upper and lower shock mounts for about half the cost.

    after getting them installed and seeing how much more solid they are i am realizing that i should have replaced all the other bolts with Ti ones to make it easier to disassemble while i was at it. i am working on finding the right Ti bolt sizing to order as we speak to do so as i know it is only a matter of time before i have to take it apart again and more soft alum bolts get stripped or broken.

    anyone who has had problems with the alum bolts (which seems to be anyone that has laid a tool on them) should seriously consider this IMO.

    crappy iphone pic but you get the point.


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    It's true!

    Quote Originally Posted by oo00oo View Post
    "The bolts are reverse thread on that part for some reason"

    Cheeky buggers! No wonder I couldn't get the damn things undone
    On my 2011 Remedy, the main pivot bolt and rear evo link bolts (that link to the seatstay) are reverse threaded. I worked that out but getting the right torque was more of an issue because my ratcheting torque wrench does not "work" (doesn't give a reading) in reverse. This is something I found out the hard way. So, be careful. Unless you have a really long 10mm hex attached to a torque wrench...

    I was also on the hunt for some creaking noises under power. Turns out that my ABP pivot needed some love and the dropout plates needed a little smear of grease between the dropouts and seatstay interface.

    I must have got one of the good ones, because my bearings have been in very good condition with regard to greased bearings.
    Professional Lurker + exPropheteer (I got the poison, I got the Remedy)

  134. #134
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    Quote Originally Posted by roke_mnt View Post
    Honkonbobo: where did you get the Ti bolts from, and what size are them?, or do you have a part number?, after a year I decided to regrease the bearings and stripped the lower bolt , thanks
    i found the Ti bolts at Toronto cycles. these diagrams should help you source what you need. you didnt say what year you have but be careful as some of the parts do change from year to year. i think the 2008s are the same as the 2009 but you better verify to be sure. cheers.




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    Thank you honkonbobo, mine is a 2008, I grew impatient last week and ordered some (expensive) nukeproof ti bolts from CRC, the lower bolt should be shorter but it doesn't seem to interfere with anything, at this point I'm just going to ride as it is, thanks for the link anyhow, lots of good stuff there



    [QUOTE=honkonbobo;8999278]i found the Ti bolts at Toronto cycles. these diagrams should help you source what you need. you didnt say what year you have but be careful as some of the parts do change from year to year. i think the 2008s are the same as the 2009 but you better verify to be sure. cheers.

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    I agree

    I love my 2009 Top Fuel SSL. But the rear suspension was making a new creaking sound.
    I ordered a bearing kit from RWC and swapped all of the bearings out.. I believe there were 7.

    It took about an hour (1st time I've ever done a bearing replacement).. and required NO special tools. The old bearings came out with a slight tap with a hammer and wooden dowel. Put the new bearings in and tightened the bolts to spec.. and after 3 months of hard riding, I have had no more creaking issues... note that one of the old bearings was completely failed and 2 of the other old bearings did not spin at all. I can feel a definate improvement in the rear suspension.. MUCH smooter and reactive.

    The kit was 40$ and was super easy to use. They use sealed bearings that should last for years. I would have purchased one of there BB bearing kits, but they don't have one that will fit my bike.. I'm using FSA cranks which use a one off bearing (not true 24mm).

  137. #137
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    I lost one of my EVO link bolts (top fuel) at the seat stay during a race. The bearing was locked up as well. Call me crazy but this is uncalled for on a $4000+ frame....any frame for that matter. Trek didn't offer to replace it but was eager to sell local my shop one. I've heard many others with same complaints.

  138. #138
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    I got a 2011 Session 8 about 6 weeks ago, I assembled it myself out of the box. First day out and second time down the trail the bolts on the Evo link start squeaking badly and the crank is creaking. I knew right away it needed some attention and what it was. I took the entire bike apart and added some grease to every pivot point since it seems reasonable to me that when metal meets metal and is intended to move, it needs grease. Which there was literally zero. The crank was disgusting, it was slathered with so much grease it was ridiculous, you'd think that would at least be better than nothing except it wasn't on the parts of the crank that need to be greased it was just all over the outside of the BB. All the grease on the BB and none anywhere else, really!?!?

    I have to keep reminding myself that the bike really does ride awesome and I got a huge deal on it. Although it is very disappointing to see the lack of quality put into assembling to the bike prior to boxing it up. Trek clearly puts effort into design but c'mon, it would have been better to box all the parts up and not assemble it whatsoever.

    At least I know for sure the entire bike is 100% the way it should be now.
    "Let the wheels spin."

  139. #139
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    Guys found this youtube video of the checking of a fuel ex bearings. I think it might help visualise the process.

    MTBR wont let me post links cause apparently i dont have enough posts yet. (serious?)

    anyways the video is called

    "Guide on how to check a used mountain bike frames pivot bearing."

    its posted by a scotsman with youtube name KaeSae1

    if someone else can link the video might be helpful.

  140. #140
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    Quote Originally Posted by Red Ant View Post
    Guys found this youtube video of the checking of a fuel ex bearings. I think it might help visualise the process.

    MTBR wont let me post links cause apparently i dont have enough posts yet. (serious?)

    anyways the video is called

    "Guide on how to check a used mountain bike frames pivot bearing."

    its posted by a scotsman with youtube name KaeSae1

    if someone else can link the video might be helpful.

  141. #141
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    Quote Originally Posted by .bg. View Post
    Nice! I looked for a video of this a while back didn't find anything, this is great.

  142. #142
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    The Scotsman is on fire. He has another couple of videos on his youtube site showing removal of Fuel Ex bearings and installation of new bearing using a standard "vaice grep" (thats scottish phonetics for vice grip)

  143. #143
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    Remedy, Fuel and other Trek full suspension owners: Check your pivot bearings!

    Very helpful video. I had a creaking issue on my EX8 and turned out to be the ABP pivots. I will now go back and check all the bearings.

  144. #144
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    Argh, I haven't done anything to my Fuel EX 9 2011 for two years.
    Now when looking at the bike I have some play when moving the rear up and down.

    I guess it is time to get a new bearings kit.

    /Edit. I looked at it and it was just a loose bolt. But I will put some grease on anyway.
    Last edited by kave; 08-20-2013 at 11:26 PM.

  145. #145
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    Sorry to revive an old thread. I have a 2011 Trek Fuel EX9 frame. It's winter here in Colorado and I've been meaning to replace my pivot bearings solely based on what I've read here. While performing the bearing swaps, I did find that the majority of the pivot bearings were completely shot. They would move slightly but not a full rotation. The bearing at the rear wheel axle location seemed to be the only one's in the best shape. Definitely a bit strange that these bearings went out so quick as they are Japan made bearings which I assumed were supposed to be higher quality. Replaced them with Enduro MAX bearings. Can't wait to get out on a ride with the new bearings as I'm assuming the suspension will be a bit more plush now. Also, hopefully some of the creaking I've been hearing will be gone. Now, if the 3+ inches of snow we are getting right now would just melt and dry up... I could get back on the trails! Oh, these two video links were EXTREMELY useful to help out with the installation:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YuQGXbbkreM
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a4ej_Cy3rtU

  146. #146
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    Finally got the bike out for a test ride. WOW!!! If you're on the fence about this, get off the fence and do this now. My rear suspension feels brand new (I do service my rear shock regularly just so there's no confusion here). All annoying squeaks an creeks are COMPLETELY gone. I'm so stoked. Highly recommend investing the time to do this to your Trek ABP/EVO rear end. Make sure to replace all the bearings and use blue loctite while re-tightening. Also, unlike the one of the videos above, I say screw checking the bearings, just get them all replaced.

  147. #147
    Always in the wrong gear
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    Bumping an old thread for advice.

    I'm rehabbing a 2010 Fuel EX9, and all (with care) the linkage came apart just fine **EXCEPT** for the main pivot bolt (bottom, near the chainstays and seat tube). I can't for the life of me figure out how to get it out. The non-drive side is either a bolthead with one pair of wrench flats, or a 10mm hex-key inside. The Drive side is....nothing. it's hollow, smooth on the outside and inside, and when I turn the ratchet with the 10mm hex socket, the drive side spins. I can't get a purchase on it to stop it.


    Looking for advice to get this apart. Ill upload pics tonight. FWIW, it's part number 7 in the diagram.
    Remedy, Fuel and other Trek full suspension owners: Check your pivot bearings!-2010fuelexalumdrcv.jpg
    Shiftin' jumps and huckin' gears

  148. #148
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    While using 10mm allen to keep the bolt in place, loosen the nut with the adjustable wrench.
    2020 Turbo Levo SL Expert Carbon

  149. #149
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    Quote Originally Posted by mlx john View Post
    While using 10mm allen to keep the bolt in place, loosen the nut with the adjustable wrench.
    This.

    You MIGHT need to use a rubber mallet to gently guid that bolt out. Make sure to use plenty of blue loctite on that nut/bolt when you reassemble. Mine came loose from not using enough blue loctite. You can always wipe the excess off once the nut is torqued down.

  150. #150
    Always in the wrong gear
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    Quote Originally Posted by mlx john View Post
    While using 10mm allen to keep the bolt in place, loosen the nut with the adjustable wrench.
    I canít fathom why this didnít occur to me before you pointed it out. Thank you so much.
    Shiftin' jumps and huckin' gears

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