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  1. #1401
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    Just been scoping out if there's a fresh one coming out soon for 2020 because a new bike is due and i'd rather get the freshest version... i know the one that currently is out is great but just trying to figure out possible bikes for a buy in 2020...

  2. #1402
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    Quote Originally Posted by freyrida View Post
    Just been scoping out if there's a fresh one coming out soon for 2020 because a new bike is due and i'd rather get the freshest version... i know the one that currently is out is great but just trying to figure out possible bikes for a buy in 2020...
    Just spoke to them last week to order a frame for a team guy and word was new colors but not new design. I think they have an update on one of the frames, but id be guessing (the smuggler inventory is pretty low).


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  3. #1403
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    Quote Originally Posted by Grizzy View Post
    Just spoke to them last week to order a frame for a team guy and word was new colors but not new design. I think they have an update on one of the frames, but id be guessing (the smuggler inventory is pretty low).


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    My understanding was the changes were to the 27.5 line, but I could be mistaken.

  4. #1404
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    I think Marco Osborne has been racing a Sentinel with a modified rear triangle (Trans Provence and EWS)... ...I have no idea if that means there are changes coming on that model for 2020 or if it's just a one-off thing.

  5. #1405
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    Quote Originally Posted by uberstein View Post
    I think Marco Osborne has been racing a Sentinel with a modified rear triangle (Trans Provence and EWS)... ...I have no idea if that means there are changes coming on that model for 2020 or if it's just a one-off thing.
    https://transitionbikes.com/Feature_...theMullets.cfm

    Plenty of pics of the Trans Provence bikes there. Good side shot at the end of Marco's bike if the nerds wanna get the protractors out and see what sorcery is going on.

  6. #1406
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    Hmm. I noticed that he had alu seatstays on the rear triangle, but the rest of his bike is carbon. Also, he's running a VAN shock, rather than a DHX2.

  7. #1407
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andeh View Post
    Hmm. I noticed that he had alu seatstays on the rear triangle, but the rest of his bike is carbon. Also, he's running a VAN shock, rather than a DHX2.
    Seat stays have the Giddy Up Link (i.E. "horse link"). By modifying the chain stay and pivot location relative to the rear axle, they can change the leverage curve a little bit, they can change the chain stay length, they can change the tire clearance, can change the bottom bracket height, and to a small extent they could change the amount of rear wheel travel (assuming the Bellcrank linkage is the "normal" version).

    So, by just tweaking the seat stays with a welded set, they can modify the bike a fair bit.

    To my eye, I'd say they extended the chain stay length a tad. that would increase tire clearance by the "loam shelf" the same amount. Depending on how they dimensioned the seat stays, and where they located the rear wheel axle, they might have changed tire clearance (seat stay bridge) and leverage kinematics.

    It's easy enough to speculate from the cheap seats. Who knows, maybe he just smashed a chain stay and replaced it with the quickest/easiest option and got a stock aluminum set.

  8. #1408
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rumblefish2010 View Post
    Why would you have a new model when the existing is so good?
    Itís only that good until the next version comes out. At least in the mtb industry, it is very rare for a newer model to go backwards, or even stay stagnant for that matter.

    I was just talking about what I wanted to see in the new Sentinel with my friend. Show me that high pivot baby!

  9. #1409
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    https://www.bikemag.com/gear/bike-sh...ke-done-right/


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    I wish my grass was emo so it would cut itself...

  10. #1410
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    If anybody wants to try out a coil shock I have one posted on Pinkbike for a great deal:

    https://www.pinkbike.com/buysell/2611473/

    Works great, but I'm going for a lighter more active ride and decided on going back to air.

  11. #1411
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andeh View Post
    Hmm. I noticed that he had alu seatstays on the rear triangle, but the rest of his bike is carbon. Also, he's running a VAN shock, rather than a DHX2.
    Sometimes the cheaper more basic shocks are the right way to go if your are getting aftermarket valving. I know Craig @ Avalanche racing recommends the lower end Fox / Marz stuff since it's pointless to spend $$ on the nice stuff if your going for custom tunes anyways.

  12. #1412
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    Saw the 2020 sentinal n scout should be launch around april totally new design with 63.6HA if not mistaken n sharp design without any curves like current model

  13. #1413
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    April? That is next year?

    Are they having any different suspension?

  14. #1414
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    Yup shoul be april next year coming this sept just new color n coil spec updates

    It looks same suspension design SBG. Maybe some updates longer travel n aggressive geo. But i like the sharp design almost like mondraker + canyon strive looks sick

  15. #1415
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zairul Hafiz View Post
    Saw the 2020 sentinal n scout should be launch around april totally new design with 63.6HA if not mistaken n sharp design without any curves like current model
    Nice! Source?


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  16. #1416
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sid Duffman View Post
    Nice! Source?
    Kinda random, huh?

    Zairul Hafiz, why should we trust you?


    But, an update in april? Tax refund (if I actually get one this year)!

  17. #1417
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    Well i saw with my own eye u guys just need to wait till they announced it ahhahah.

  18. #1418
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    Probably a dude who works at the factory.....

  19. #1419
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zairul Hafiz View Post
    Well i saw with my own eye u guys just need to wait till they announced it ahhahah.
    Shhhh... donít be giving away secrets. Youíre hurting the resale value on my current Sentinel if everyone knows (thinks) a new one is on the way.

  20. #1420
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    Lucky im on patrol FTW

  21. #1421
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    Just built up my new Sentinel!
    Transition Sentinel-p5pb17648671.jpg

  22. #1422
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    Quote Originally Posted by stoltlama View Post
    Just built up my new Sentinel!
    Congrats. Looks great. Beautiful pic too.
    How much travel does that fork have???

  23. #1423
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    Quote Originally Posted by solar_evolution View Post
    Congrats. Looks great. Beautiful pic too.
    How much travel does that fork have???
    Its a 160mm. By far the best bike I've ever ridden

  24. #1424
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    Transition Sentinel-sentinel-1.pngTransition Sentinel-sentinel-2.pngLoving this bike so far!

  25. #1425
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    I've put the 1.0 volume spacer, the largest, into the DPX2.
    So, far it seems to be better. I'm running less pressure than before but still getting the mid-stroke support and not bottoming out on small things.

    I've also installed CushCore into the rear wheel along with running folding bead DH Assegai 2.5WT tires front and back.
    I believe that the Assegai tires are much better than the benchmark DHFs.
    The CushCore is an interesting experience. I'm running less pressure in the tire than I normally go with and there's still a good amount of sidewall support in high speed and hard cornering with the added benefit of insane grip.

    I think I have my suspension dialed but then there's a section of trail that I'll ride and it feels like the rear shock is shit.
    It's funny because I'll ride one day on a trail that's gnarly and somewhat new to me and the Sentinel will feel great. Then I'll ride a trail that I ride regularly and there'll be a section where the rear end feels like shit.
    At some point I guess you just need to settle with good enough.

    I still very much enjoy riding the Sentinel. But, I'm getting tired of thinking that it could feel better. It only happens occasionally but that's what sticks with me.
    The problem is I've ridden on a bike that had the rear suspension setup beautifully regardless of terrain. I've yet to reach that sensation on the Sentinel. It's good but I haven't hit the feeling of "Yes, this is it!"

    Please don't suggest that I spend money and get a different shock. I'm sticking with the DPX2 and trying to make it feel beautiful. I haven't given up on this shock... yet.

  26. #1426
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    As there isn't a do it all bike there isn't also a do it all suspension set up. Most of the times it is a compromise and you are looking for the happy medium that is good enough overall.

    Of course you mention that your previous bike was great regardless of the terrain but I think that this is just the exception and not the rule.

  27. #1427
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    For me, I have almost the same feeling. Struggling to find a setup that's fits for all my ride in a good way.

    Went also up for the 1.0 Token, but was very harsh in the end of travel, couldn't use all travel an had a lot of pedal strikes.
    Now back on 0.86, more pressure ( 235psi with 82kg), seems to feel better...

  28. #1428
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    Ended up creating an account to chat with more sentinel owners. Sorry if this post gets long.

    I'm looking for my new bike. I'm sold on a mid/long travel 29er.

    I'm on the fence about buying a 2019 or 2020 alloy or carbon GX sentinel. I was in Bellingham a few weeks back and demoed the Alloy. Unfortunately, I was fairly under the weather all weekend and riding poorly. To compound matters, I'm from BC and completely unfamiliar with the terrain. I love steep techy stuff like Pemberton and Whistler valley trails or Squamish. Most of what I've ridden in WA is fairly flowy, so I was a bit out of my element.

    First off, I noticed the sentinel is a bit more tiring to pedal than my current bike (a 2018 RM Altitude). It noticeably bobs when pedaling out of the saddle - however I didn't feel too much feedback while seated. (This totally could have been due to the fact I was pretty out of it from a cold). Climbing up to some of my favorite Whistler trails like Howler and Microclimate can be a real slog. Often the days start on 18% grade fire roads and don't relent for 45+ minutes.

    Can anyone comment on how this bike has treated them in areas of the world with lung busting climbs?

    When descending, the bike felt awesome. Fast and composed. Not exactly nimble, but I'm comparing this to a (much) smaller Altitude on 27.5 inch wheels. Definitely confidence inspiring. The thing is, most of what I rode on Galbraith was flow. Trails that didn't require heaps of rider input or line selection. My home trails *can* require a lot more precision and aren't always conducive to speed (for my ability level). I wish I could've had a weekend on my own trails to better gauge the rig's performance.

    I'm wondering if people find this bike still works for riders that like to billy goat down lines rather than bulldoze. If I get crossed up, how hard do people find it to finesse their sentinel to a new line? Some more time on the bike could help me answer this, but I want to make a decision sooner than later!

    I own a DH bike, so my trail bike will only enter the park for extra-credit type laps. I'd say I'm more keen on a "light" enduro bike. Maybe this is something you sentinel owners can comment on if I'm barking up the wrong tree. For reference, some of the other bikes I've demoed:

    Ripmo
    Process 153
    Hightower 2020

    So far the Sentinel and Ripmo have been two of the most enjoyable bikes I've ridden.

    Thanks for reading!

  29. #1429
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    Try to ride a Stumpjumper Evo as well, specially one with a 160mm fork and the shock spacer removed

  30. #1430
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    Quote Originally Posted by Natazhat View Post
    Can anyone comment on how this bike has treated them in areas of the world with lung busting climbs?
    ...

    I'm wondering if people find this bike still works for riders that like to billy goat down lines rather than bulldoze. If I get crossed up, how hard do people find it to finesse their sentinel to a new line? Some more time on the bike could help me answer this, but I want to make a decision sooner than later!

    I own a DH bike, so my trail bike will only enter the park for extra-credit type laps. I'd say I'm more keen on a "light" enduro bike. Maybe this is something you sentinel owners can comment on if I'm barking up the wrong tree. For reference, some of the other bikes I've demoed:

    Ripmo
    Process 153
    Hightower 2020
    We have some fairly long gravel and singletrack climbs here in WNC, mostly sustained mountain climbing. I don't feel like the Sentinel bobs excessively, but it is relative. When I got my first Patrol, I was coming off a 5010v2, which was much more forgiving on your pedal stroke than the Transition bike were. I found that I had to smooth out my pedal strokes to avoid bob and, once I did, I barely notice it any longer. It seems to reward a smoother pedal stroke with a harder gear, but mashing hard will definitely induce more bob than on VPP or dw-Link bikes.

    I used to ride SS a lot, so I climb out of the saddle a fair bit. I don't feel that they bob excessively, but if you aren't good with a smooth stroke or steady cadence, then it's easy to get it to bob heavily.

    That said, the small bump compliance was considerably better than both the SC and Ibis bikes I've ridden.

    Compared to the other bikes you mention, the length of the wheelbase will be the biggest factor going downhill. Once again, it's not necessarily a problem, but it takes some getting used to. I had a Smuggler previously (similar geo to the Ripmo) and was able to cheat in corners a lot easier, I could come in on the inside and make it fine, but with the Sentinel you really have to get ahead of it and hit all of your corners wide, because it can be kindof hard to get around them if you end up going into it wrong.

    I ride a lot of tight trails with narrow, one shot lines and don't feel it's too much, but you have to make decision earlier and line up earlier than you will with another bike. That's both due to the geometry and the speed you can carry on the straighter sections, which requires longer vision.

    A friend of mine just bought one coming from a Scott Genius and had the same issues. He was trying to cut in the center of a corner rather than go wide, so he was questioning why he was going faster in some spots than in others. When we watched his cornering technique, he needed to be setting up for the corner sooner.

    If you do any technical climbing, the Sentinel doesn't feel much worse to me than the Smuggler, but the rear wheel being further back can make it snag things a little easier while the front is trying to deal with something else, especially on staircase type climbs. It's a minor gripe and one I was able to adjust to, but something else worth noting.

    Personally, the suspension performance and stability on the Transition bikes is a lot better than the others (I haven't ridden a Kona) you mention, but the Sentinel is also less nimble and longer. I'd take the suspension performance and stability, the other issues I can compensate for, but it'll depend on your trails.

    I'd also add that both SC and Ibis use good designs when it comes to maintaining the bike. The lack of internally tubed routing on a $3000 frame (Transition) is pretty bad IMO. Every other frame at that price point has internal tubes for routing, Transition is the only one I have to run a silencing kit for to keep the cables from making noise inside the frame. The bearings are also very exposed compared to SC or Ibis, particularly the lower link. If you ride in wetter climates, you'll find yourself having to pop the seal off, flush, and re-grease the bearing about once a month because it's so exposed to the elements. It takes maybe 20-25 minutes, but the SC bearings in particular are much more protected. I have heard of issues with the Ibis bushings wearing out, though. Point being, I like the way Transition bikes ride, but they need to put more thought into ease of maintenance and longevity.

  31. #1431
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    I have not ridden the Ripmo, but I previously owned an Ibis HDR, and a Nomad 3. Currently own a Sentinel and Smuggler. In terms of suspension, I think it's an old topic. Ibis' DW Link climbs great but is really chattery going down. Santa Cruz's VPP is somewhere in between. Horst Link like Transition uses is awesome descending but relies heavily on the climb switch for out-of-the-saddle climbing.

    There aren't a ton of really steep trails where I am, but one of the local shop guys and trail gnomes is originally from BC, so the stuff he likes and digs is very steep. I strongly appreciate the super slack head angle of my Sentinel over my other bikes. I'd be really put off by the 66* HTA of the Ripmo if I frequently rode steep stuff, unless you wanted to throw in a -1.5* angleset.

    All those bikes are going to face a similar disadvantage on the really tight techy stuff, just due to their massive wheelbase, but the Sentinel will have one of the longer ones. As mentioned above, I do find that I need to be looking further down the trail, and initiating turns earlier. It feels like riding 190 skis vs. 175s. But it is incredibly stable through the rough, and the faster you go the more stable it gets. It has definitely gotten me riding faster and more confidently through chunkier and steeper trails.

  32. #1432
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andeh View Post
    I have not ridden the Ripmo, but I previously owned an Ibis HDR, and a Nomad 3. Currently own a Sentinel and Smuggler. In terms of suspension, I think it's an old topic. Ibis' DW Link climbs great but is really chattery going down. Santa Cruz's VPP is somewhere in between. Horst Link like Transition uses is awesome descending but relies heavily on the climb switch for out-of-the-saddle climbing.

    There aren't a ton of really steep trails where I am, but one of the local shop guys and trail gnomes is originally from BC, so the stuff he likes and digs is very steep. I strongly appreciate the super slack head angle of my Sentinel over my other bikes. I'd be really put off by the 66* HTA of the Ripmo if I frequently rode steep stuff, unless you wanted to throw in a -1.5* angleset.

    All those bikes are going to face a similar disadvantage on the really tight techy stuff, just due to their massive wheelbase, but the Sentinel will have one of the longer ones. As mentioned above, I do find that I need to be looking further down the trail, and initiating turns earlier. It feels like riding 190 skis vs. 175s. But it is incredibly stable through the rough, and the faster you go the more stable it gets. It has definitely gotten me riding faster and more confidently through chunkier and steeper trails.
    How do you find it in situations where the trail requires some slow precise moves? Say technical slabs, tricky off camber corners, etc.

  33. #1433
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    Quote Originally Posted by Natazhat View Post
    How do you find it in situations where the trail requires some slow precise moves? Say technical slabs, tricky off camber corners, etc.
    No slabs where I ride, but setting up for G-outs or chutes, I don't have any problem slowing speed, lining up, then letting it rip.

    I'm not great at off-cambers, but what I find is sort of similar to what I said before. I have to slow down a lot more than what I/the bike want to ride, line up, put a lot of body movement into the turn, then accelerate out of it. I find I moto-leg turns like these way more than I used to, as it helps wrestle the bike over more.

    I'm sure a more skilled pilot would be fine on the parts I struggle with (in fact, I know a guy on an XL Bronson 3 who cleans them fine, and that's a much bigger bike). His reach roughly the entire ETT of my medium.

  34. #1434
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    Quote Originally Posted by Natazhat View Post
    Ended up creating an account to chat with more sentinel owners. Sorry if this post gets long.

    I'm looking for my new bike. I'm sold on a mid/long travel 29er.

    I'm on the fence about buying a 2019 or 2020 alloy or carbon GX sentinel. I was in Bellingham a few weeks back and demoed the Alloy. Unfortunately, I was fairly under the weather all weekend and riding poorly. To compound matters, I'm from BC and completely unfamiliar with the terrain. I love steep techy stuff like Pemberton and Whistler valley trails or Squamish. Most of what I've ridden in WA is fairly flowy, so I was a bit out of my element.

    First off, I noticed the sentinel is a bit more tiring to pedal than my current bike (a 2018 RM Altitude). It noticeably bobs when pedaling out of the saddle - however I didn't feel too much feedback while seated. (This totally could have been due to the fact I was pretty out of it from a cold). Climbing up to some of my favorite Whistler trails like Howler and Microclimate can be a real slog. Often the days start on 18% grade fire roads and don't relent for 45+ minutes.

    Can anyone comment on how this bike has treated them in areas of the world with lung busting climbs?

    When descending, the bike felt awesome. Fast and composed. Not exactly nimble, but I'm comparing this to a (much) smaller Altitude on 27.5 inch wheels. Definitely confidence inspiring. The thing is, most of what I rode on Galbraith was flow. Trails that didn't require heaps of rider input or line selection. My home trails *can* require a lot more precision and aren't always conducive to speed (for my ability level). I wish I could've had a weekend on my own trails to better gauge the rig's performance.

    I'm wondering if people find this bike still works for riders that like to billy goat down lines rather than bulldoze. If I get crossed up, how hard do people find it to finesse their sentinel to a new line? Some more time on the bike could help me answer this, but I want to make a decision sooner than later!

    I own a DH bike, so my trail bike will only enter the park for extra-credit type laps. I'd say I'm more keen on a "light" enduro bike. Maybe this is something you sentinel owners can comment on if I'm barking up the wrong tree. For reference, some of the other bikes I've demoed:

    Ripmo
    Process 153
    Hightower 2020

    So far the Sentinel and Ripmo have been two of the most enjoyable bikes I've ridden.

    Thanks for reading!
    I'm in Whistler and ride a Sentinel.

    It sounds like we ride pretty similar terrain/trails up and down the S2S corridor.

    I definitely use the climb switch on the DPX2 on my Sentinel for the long drawn out climbs. I'm a seated climber rarely getting out of the saddle. I only stand up for short steep up and over tech bits at which point I can't say I notice bob.
    I can't say I notice the weight of the bike too much because I've always ridden the largest bike I can get which means that they have some heft to them.

    For the older school trails that have silly tech on them I do find I need to be more "on it" and sometimes muscle the Sentinel through the tricky tech sections. Where the trail allows I try to let the bike run a bit faster as it's easier to maneuver.
    I still can pick my way down slow tech lines but you really need to know where you are putting both your front and back wheel because the bike is long. As has been stated you need to set up wider for any kind of turning/cornering.

    Where the Sentinel really shines is on the steep higher paced trails like you mentioned, Howler and Microclimate. The bike comes alive at speed. I definitely like to plow but the Sentinel does allow me pop around when the mood strikes me.

    It has taken me quite some time to get the rear shock (DPX2) feeling decent. Higher pressures and minimal Rebound damping is the key. I've just started riding with the biggest volume spacer in the shock which has allowed me to come down a bit in pressure. This has helped with the small bump stuff making the shock smoother and leas likely to bottom hard. I'm still working on it but it's pretty close to being good.

    All of your bike choices look good. It's definitely a challenge to make the choice you think you'll be happy with.

  35. #1435
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    And, to respond to your slab question.
    Yes, it does great!

    I've ridden most, if not all, of the rock slabs in the S2S on my Sentinel.

    I love riding slabs/rocklines. I find if I don't have the line that I originally wanted and can't make it on it I have faith in my Sentinel and skills that I can ride out the iffy line I ended up on. So far, it hasn't bit me. The Sentinel does like to be lined up and pointed. It can be finessed but point and shoot is more it's style. I find, anyways.

    As an aside I do think that tires are a more important factor when riding slabs. Durometer and pressure for rock slabs and off camber.

  36. #1436
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    There seems to have been some discussion about the DPX2 tune on the Sentinel. I recently bought a takeoff DPX2 that was tuned by Avalanche for my Sentinel and ran the tune code. Interestingly, there seem to be two tune codes for the 2019 Sentinel.

    2018 Sentinel tune code: DG8X
    2018, FLOAT DPX2, P-Se, A, 3pos-Adj, Trunnion Evol LV, Transition, Sentinel, 205, 57.5, 0.6 Spacer, CM, DRM, Rezi A F M, Standard Logo

    2019 Sentinel Carbon tune code: DM83
    2019, FLOAT DPX2, P-Se, A, 3pos-Adj, Trunnion, Evol LV, Transition, Sentinel, 205, 57.5, 0.9 Spacer, CAL001, RAL001, Rezi A F M, Standard Logo

    2019 Sentinel Carbon tune code: DM82
    2019, FLOAT DPX2, P-Se, A, 3pos-Adj, Trunnion, Evol LV, Transition, Sentinel, 205, 57.5, 0.9 Spacer, CAL001, RLA014, Rezi A F M, Standard Logo

    The most interesting change to me is the change from a .6 -> .9 volume spacer.

    My 2019 came with the .9 spacer on it (blue), but I have some pretty considerable trouble getting beyond ~52mm of the stroke. I don't think I've ever gotten below that on the stroke of the shock, which is leaving 5.5mm of stroke that is never reached. Apparently the 2018 had a .6 spacer instead, which seems to be a pretty common change for 2019 owners.

    I'll be changing the .6 over to the old, non-Avy shock before trying the new one, to see how it compares with the old spacer. I'll then try the Avy shock.

  37. #1437
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    The dpx is traveled from 60 to 57.5 stroke. It is not possible to use all of the travel . Remove air an try...

  38. #1438
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    Quote Originally Posted by Britney83 View Post
    The dpx is traveled from 60 to 57.5 stroke. It is not possible to use all of the travel . Remove air an try...
    My post was more about the change from the .6 in the 2018 models the .9 in the 2019. I'm not sure it was a great change.

    I'm already pretty close to 20mm of sag, my experience being that just dropping air out of the rear to reach full travel results in low ride height, slow rebound, and negative effects on the geometry. I've had better experiences reducing volume spacers and increasing air pressure to provide support, otherwise you just end up bucking up against the progression point too much and have balance issues with the front.

    I'm gonna try the .6 and up to about the 18mm point of the sag, we'll see how that plays out. I mainly posted the tunes, because I thought it was interesting that the spacer size changed.

    Interestingly enough, Fox says you shouldn't use the .9 or .83 spacer in the DPX2 because it makes the compression ratio too high. Not sure why it's shipped with that spacer.

  39. #1439
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    Couple things:
    1) You're reading the Fox chart wrong. The stock shock on a Sentinel is actually a 65mm stroke, reduced to 57.5. A 65mm version is OK with up to the 1.02 spacer. Transition confirmed this for me, and said they worked with Fox to determine this. I ran a 1.02 in mine before I switched to an 11-6.
    2) If you're not using your all your travel at the correct sag, you're probably not riding trails that warrant full use of travel. I had no problem bottoming mine out at 18mm sag & the 1.02 spacer. You just said that further dropping pressure makes it ride worse, so why would you do that just to chase "full use of travel"?

  40. #1440
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andeh View Post
    Couple things:
    1) You're reading the Fox chart wrong. The stock shock on a Sentinel is actually a 65mm stroke, reduced to 57.5. A 65mm version is OK with up to the 1.02 spacer. Transition confirmed this for me, and said they worked with Fox to determine this. I ran a 1.02 in mine before I switched to an 11-6.
    2) If you're not using your all your travel at the correct sag, you're probably not riding trails that warrant full use of travel. I had no problem bottoming mine out at 18mm sag & the 1.02 spacer. You just said that further dropping pressure makes it ride worse, so why would you do that just to chase "full use of travel"?
    1. I was under the impression it was the 205x60, not the 65. Good to know.

    2. It seems to bottom harshly on around the 51-52mm point. It feels like a full bottom out, but when I measure it, it's not even close. That's at bike parks and a lot of varied trails. I'm not chasing full travel usage, but it does seem like there should be more support from the shock and I shouldn't feel like the shock is bottoming out at 52mm of stroke. There are a few hits I've had with it where I felt it should have used more of the stroke, but it never went beyond that point in the stroke.

  41. #1441
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    Quote Originally Posted by Adodero View Post
    1. I was under the impression it was the 205x60, not the 65. Good to know.

    2. It seems to bottom harshly on around the 51-52mm point. It feels like a full bottom out, but when I measure it, it's not even close. That's at bike parks and a lot of varied trails. I'm not chasing full travel usage, but it does seem like there should be more support from the shock and I shouldn't feel like the shock is bottoming out at 52mm of stroke. There are a few hits I've had with it where I felt it should have used more of the stroke, but it never went beyond that point in the stroke.
    Responding to your #2 point.

    The issue you're having with not getting full travel and not very good support from the shock overall sounds very similar to the issues I was having when I first got my Sentinel.
    I bought my Sentinel used but minimally ridden and in very good condition from the previous owner.

    I asked the previous owner if he knew if there were any spacers in the DPX2 and he wasn't sure. Up to that point I was really struggling trying to get the shock to ride well. I also wasn't getting full travel from the shock.
    I opened the shock up and found that there was indeed the stock 0.6 spacer. I did take the spacer out to check what size it was. After I had closed the shock back up and aired it up it suddenly was giving me the full use of the travel and much more support through the entirety of the stroke with way less harsh bottom outs.

    I honestly don't know what happened with the shock. But opening up and putting it back together again seemed to have sorted whatever the problem was.
    I don't know if my little story will help you but it may be worth opening and closing up the shock to have look. You never know, maybe it'll help! Sometimes it's just Bike Magic!

  42. #1442
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    You are right it is a 205x60 reduced travel with 2.5mm. You see the 2.5 dish when open up to change volume reducer. The table from fox shows that 0.86 volume reducer is n/a. So why transition advice 1.02 is strange? See link https://www.ridefox.com/fox17/help.php?m=bike&id=568

    When you feel the travel ramps up too much at 52mm travel it does. You will benefit to use a 0.4 volume reducer and go really high in pressure. Just start at 30 psi over your weight in lb. Just go higher until you feel the ride gets right. Remember this will also require that you obtain dynamic sag on your fork too, otherwise you alter the geo too much. That is if you typical has 30% sag in the fork.

    It is a misconception that the ride feel gets plusher with less pressure on these bikes with dpx2. Actually it gets plusher running firmer air spring and less volume reducer.


    Quote Originally Posted by Adodero View Post
    1. I was under the impression it was the 205x60, not the 65. Good to know.

    2. It seems to bottom harshly on around the 51-52mm point. It feels like a full bottom out, but when I measure it, it's not even close. That's at bike parks and a lot of varied trails. I'm not chasing full travel usage, but it does seem like there should be more support from the shock and I shouldn't feel like the shock is bottoming out at 52mm of stroke. There are a few hits I've had with it where I felt it should have used more of the stroke, but it never went beyond that point in the stroke.

  43. #1443
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    if you want to read about Murphy from Push and his advice about suspension set up and what he thinks riders are doing most wrong, try the link below.

    I think this is the best part of it, with the advice of set up:
    "Continuing to soften their suspension when it feels "harsh". It's counter-intuitive, but most times when your suspension feels harsh it's because it's too soft. Riding to low in the travel over bumps puts you in the more progressive part of the fork travel in the front, or more progressive part of the linkage rate in the rear. Stiffening the suspension causing it to ride higher in the stroke will often lead to a softer overall ride.
    To better understand, go to your bike and just compress the fork through the first inch or two of travel. You'll get a pretty compliant initial feel. Now, lean into the fork and preload it an inch and a half and try to compress it through to the 3-4 inch travel mark. I know this is a pretty basic way of trying to explain it, and not necessarily indicative of the real world, but hopefully you get the idea."

    1. Spring. Your spring rate controls ride height and bottoming and should be set with your compression set soft and your rebound set fast. While sag is a great starting reference, the overall ride quality should ultimately determine your final air pressure/volume/coil spring rate.
    2. Compression. Compression damping controls the suspensions characteristic when it comes to things like brake dive, cornering performance, and pedal induced movements.
    3. Rebound. How much rebound control is necessary is determined by how much your fork or shock is compressing so it should be set last. Rebound damping also has the largest effect on rider comfort at the handlebar or feet, so having your spring rate and compression optimized first will allow you to achieve the largest level of comfort and control from your rebound setting.
    Following this order should keep you on track and reduce the chances of misdiagnosing your setup."
    https://www.vitalmtb.com/forums/The-...qad2iJMmdEp03w

  44. #1444
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    To those that have run coil shocks on their Sentinel, would greatly appreciate some feedback!

    What are currently the best options for coil rear shocks for the Sentinel? Any favorites?

    What size is compatible?

    I've read that the Sentinel is designed with a more linear suspension curve, and needs a progressive rear shock to balance it out. So does that mean a more progressive rear coil shock is best suited? Would the MRP Hazzard with the progressive spring be a good fit?

  45. #1445
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    I liked my Sentinel with the DPX2, but love it with my 11-6. The traction when plowing through chunk is just incredible. I ran coil on my last bike, and after going back to it again, I'm pretty sure I wouldn't run anything else on an enduro bike. I do bottom out, but it feels less harsh when I did on the DPX2, probably due to the thick bumper. I'm sure that a good tune could be had on the DHX2 though, which would be nice considering how heavy the 11-6 is. My gut feeling is a big part of what Push did for this bike is just run a high spring rate (500# for me as a 170# rider) and less sag. Most online calculators were putting me at a 400-425# spring, I suggested a 450# to Push, and they put me on a 500#. So maybe add 75-100# more than what a calculator tells you.

    TLDR:
    * it will feel great but will bottom out noticeably
    * best bets are probably Push 11-6, EXT Storia, or as you stated another coil with one of MRP's progressive springs. You can use their adapter to run their spring on other shocks.
    * probably want something with adjustable HSC to help combat bottom-out

  46. #1446
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    Quote Originally Posted by jdadour View Post
    To those that have run coil shocks on their Sentinel, would greatly appreciate some feedback!

    What are currently the best options for coil rear shocks for the Sentinel? Any favorites?

    What size is compatible?

    I've read that the Sentinel is designed with a more linear suspension curve, and needs a progressive rear shock to balance it out. So does that mean a more progressive rear coil shock is best suited? Would the MRP Hazzard with the progressive spring be a good fit?
    I've seen more Sentinels with coils over the last year of racing than air shocks to be honest. I've spoken with several dudes with coils and they all seem to like them. Mostly 11-6's, but also several DHX2's, they all said they worked great. I tried a MRP Hazzard + prog coil but didn't care for it, I liked the ride of the air shock better.

    I've also spoken with Craig at Avalanche about using a tuned Marz Bomber coil rear shock which he thought was a great option....interesting thing is he suggested a std. spring.

    If I had to do it now, I'd just spring (no pun intended) for a Storia and call it good. Cheaper and lighter than a 11-6 and I've heard nothing but good things.

  47. #1447
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    I will say the only solution logic to the Sentinel, with the need of 30-32% sag is the EXT Storia V3. The key factor for choosing that shock is first that it is the only coil shock with hydraulic bottom out control in the market and it is the shock with the lowest internal pressure of any shock. HBO makes it obtain the sag needed and to be possible to run softest spring and the low internal pressure has lowest brake away force, together it makes it superior to plushness compared to other shocks in the market. (use as soft spring as possible in steep terrain and a firmer spring in more easy terrain) You get 2 springs delivered with EXT shocks.

    Next it is mandatory to get the tune specified for the Sentinel frame kinematics and rider weight/riding preferences. Specific tune for rider and bike frame is included. EXT have done a lot of work with Transition to get the shock to work for Sentinel and Patrol. Beside that the shock is one of the lightest in the market, I think it is only 200-300 grams more than Dpx2, it costs the same as Fox, Ohlins, Cane Creek, Mrp etc. Consider that you get a custom tuned with 3 light weight springs you figure out the price is same or better.

    Riding behavior:
    I was fed up with the behavior of the DPX2 in most aspects, except the agile poppy feel. Let`s say I was willing to trade off that in change of plushness and less ramp up and harshness of the dpx2.
    So I can say I was very surprised that the Storia was still giving the poppy agile feeling, but without the harshness of the dpx 2.
    The first you will find tremendous good with the EXT is the grip you get from the rear wheel.
    My riding weight is in the higher end, at 250lb/110kg and I have 550lb and 525lb spring. Still with these soft springs you have superb mid stroke support, still after having as much as 33% sag with the softest spring.
    The feel of travel with the HBO feature, makes it endless. I will say it is more like a 150-160 travel feel, compared to the dpx2.


    Just be aware of the linear suspension kinematics makes other coil shocks tricky to work with the Sentinel. You will need maybe a special tune or at least firmer springs. Fox is needed to get shortened by 2.5mm, only available at 60mm stroke. I am not sure, but I think a progressive spring is not a good solution, actually it is a band aid to try to repair something? A special tuned Mazocchi Bomber from Avalanche or likewise will for sure be awesome, but price wise it will be as expensive as the other ones (remember you will need to have 2 light weight coils too)


    Quote Originally Posted by jdadour View Post
    To those that have run coil shocks on their Sentinel, would greatly appreciate some feedback!

    What are currently the best options for coil rear shocks for the Sentinel? Any favorites?

    What size is compatible?

    I've read that the Sentinel is designed with a more linear suspension curve, and needs a progressive rear shock to balance it out. So does that mean a more progressive rear coil shock is best suited? Would the MRP Hazzard with the progressive spring be a good fit?

  48. #1448
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    The reason I went with 11-6 over Storia were:
    1) I got a 25% off "blem" model, so $900 shipped. There is 1 tiny little imperfection in the milling, literally a pin head dot. I would have had to pay tax on the Storia, so it would have been over $1,000.
    2) At least 3 reviews of EXT shocks (Arma & Storia) that I read mentioned that they weren't happy with their base tune, and had to send them back to get retuned. I have not heard that complaint with Push.
    3) The Push guys were more responsive to my communications than Brennan / EXT.

    In the end, I knew that used 11-6s go for around $800 on Pinkbike, so figured that it wasn't a huge risk for cost (getting a "blem" model). I don't disagree that the HBO concept is well-suited for this bike, but I wasn't convinced that the EXT custom tune would be as hassle-free as the Push.

  49. #1449
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andeh View Post
    The reason I went with 11-6 over Storia were:
    1) I got a 25% off "blem" model, so $900 shipped. There is 1 tiny little imperfection in the milling, literally a pin head dot. I would have had to pay tax on the Storia, so it would have been over $1,000.
    2) At least 3 reviews of EXT shocks (Arma & Storia) that I read mentioned that they weren't happy with their base tune, and had to send them back to get retuned. I have not heard that complaint with Push.
    3) The Push guys were more responsive to my communications than Brennan / EXT.

    In the end, I knew that used 11-6s go for around $800 on Pinkbike, so figured that it wasn't a huge risk for cost (getting a "blem" model). I don't disagree that the HBO concept is well-suited for this bike, but I wasn't convinced that the EXT custom tune would be as hassle-free as the Push.
    I hesitated with the Storia for a sim reason, I didn't want to deal with a company overseas if I had a problem. The distributor in Cali is a one man show (as far as I know) and didn't wanna be caught in a situation where I needed to get it rebuilt and had to wait days or weeks to get that done.

  50. #1450
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andeh View Post
    The reason I went with 11-6 over Storia were:
    1) I got a 25% off "blem" model, so $900 shipped. There is 1 tiny little imperfection in the milling, literally a pin head dot. I would have had to pay tax on the Storia, so it would have been over $1,000.
    2) At least 3 reviews of EXT shocks (Arma & Storia) that I read mentioned that they weren't happy with their base tune, and had to send them back to get retuned. I have not heard that complaint with Push.
    3) The Push guys were more responsive to my communications than Brennan / EXT.

    In the end, I knew that used 11-6s go for around $800 on Pinkbike, so figured that it wasn't a huge risk for cost (getting a "blem" model). I don't disagree that the HBO concept is well-suited for this bike, but I wasn't convinced that the EXT custom tune would be as hassle-free as the Push.
    First off, thanks everyone for the excellent responses! More than I could have asked for, great information. Ive pretty much narrowed it down to the Push and the Storia. I really like the idea of the Hydraulic Bottomout on the Storia, but agree that it would be easier to deal with a US based company like Push. What is the bottomout like on the Push? Is it that much inferior to the Storia?

  51. #1451
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    Push just uses fancy closed-cell foam bottom out bumpers. They have a variety of bumper sizes / stiffnesses that they chose from depending on the frame. So a bike like the Sentinel gets a taller / firmer bumper than one that's more inherently progressive. It's nothing as fancy as HBO, but it does the job.

    When I land a jump badly, I'd say it feels like a solid but muted "thud." Not a hard "clack" like the DPX2 feels like. I know exactly when I bottom out, but I'm not wincing and feeling like I'm about to destroy something.

  52. #1452
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    Quote Originally Posted by jdadour View Post
    First off, thanks everyone for the excellent responses! More than I could have asked for, great information. Ive pretty much narrowed it down to the Push and the Storia. I really like the idea of the Hydraulic Bottomout on the Storia, but agree that it would be easier to deal with a US based company like Push. What is the bottomout like on the Push? Is it that much inferior to the Storia?
    You do not have to ship it to Italy, since it is a US sales and service representatives. I have not seen any of the 3 reviews of the EXT that it seems to be necessary to send back for a different tune, so please give me the test references.

    The US representatives I assume will be for sure happy to help you with the tune if it is not the one you want.

  53. #1453
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rumblefish2010 View Post
    You do not have to ship it to Italy, since it is a US sales and service representatives. I have not seen any of the 3 reviews of the EXT that it seems to be necessary to send back for a different tune, so please give me the test references.

    The US representatives I assume will be for sure happy to help you with the tune if it is not the one you want.
    I saw one of the US dealer for EXT is Brennan Autosport in Northern California. Others have mentioned he is great to deal with and one person mentioned they were able to send the shock to him (not all the way to Italy) to fix a bad tune. That sounds like a good setup.

  54. #1454
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    I don't have the ones I remember book marked, but this is what I am able to find now searching:

    VitalMTB: https://www.vitalmtb.com/product/gui...ws/3303/expand
    * they had to run the rebound fully closed. Didn't sound like a very accurate custom tune - should have usable range in both directions.

    user on MTBR: https://forums.mtbr.com/knolly/ext-s...k-1103710.html
    * he had to have the compression shim stack tweaked twice. EXT did it for free, but that didn't sound like a very accurate custom tune.

    user on MTBR: https://forums.mtbr.com/shocks-suspe...l#post13793032
    * had to have compression and rebound retuned. Again, for free, but again that didn't sound like an accurate custom tune.

    The other thing I noticed was that it seemed like most people on EXTs ended up using the stiffer of the 2 springs provided. It's great you get 2, but I personally would have wanted to have the softer one usable for daily riding, with the big one available for days at the bike park (support on smooth berms & bigger hits).

    Again, not doubting that it's a good shock, I just had enough doubts about the accuracy of the custom tune that it swayed me to go with Push. I'm sure I could have ended up with a similarly great feeling shock, but it would have cost me more, and my sense was that it would have required more fiddling on my part and taken longer to get it there. Although it would have been lighter.

  55. #1455
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    Be aware that the test in Vital MTB is from 2014, and for previous generation of shock. The newer generation shocks is a lot better than previous, and data base and experience of tuning for different riders/frames from 2014 until now is tremendously larger. I will not suggest to compare previous tests with the newer generation shocks.

    I believe Push is a great product too, and I was considering buying one, though I feel that I made the right choice with the EXT.

    When it comes to other users experience you can find a few here in the comments below the test of EXT Storia V3 pinkbike https://www.pinkbike.com/news/review...-v3-shock.html

    Among the comments after the pinkbike test you will find this comment from a rider who was asked to comment why he prefer EXT over Push 11-6. These user also experience the same when it comes to brake away force, mid stroke support and playfulness that my experience:
    "The eleven six is an awesome shock, service from Darren and the guys is amazing. Like I said, I didnt see the real need for two circuits, although I appreciate others like that function. My view is that a very good damper can do pretty much everything well, so a second is a luxury I can live without and therefore surplus to requirements. The damping on the push is a little muted by which I mean it doesnt feel very lively, but it is incredibly plush. No real negative points on the shock, it just does its job and does it incredibly well in comparison to most other shocks. When I had one, I went from an Ohlins ttx22 coil and I felt the push was a 10% improvement in control and feel on both compression and rebound.

    As for the EXT, it has the most sensitive breakaway I have ever felt, literally any movement will get it to start through the range of travel. However, when you hit the mid stroke, it doesnt blow through what travel there is, it just gets on with damping and it hovers around the mid point of usable travel incredibly well. The difference to most other coils being that despite being super plush, it is also very playful, much like an air shock. Then due to the bottom out damping, you have no need to be concerned about running out of travel, or indeed feeling the end of the range at all. I know I have bottomed mine, many times, but not once have I felt it. On my push, i was aware when i used the whole travel as the bottom out bumper was not as controlled as the ext is with a hydraulic stop (I actually asked for a firmer bumper at its service). The EXT is also lighter than pretty much all other coil shocks.

    Being honest, both are epic shocks at the very top of their game. If you value the two circuits and a super smooth ride, then the Push is great if you want the ultimate in damping and sensitivity then the EXT is my choice all day long.

    Hope that helps, sorry for the lack of detail, but I'm on my phone in the woods right now taking a quick rest :-)"


    Quote Originally Posted by Andeh View Post
    I don't have the ones I remember book marked, but this is what I am able to find now searching:

    VitalMTB: https://www.vitalmtb.com/product/gui...ws/3303/expand
    * they had to run the rebound fully closed. Didn't sound like a very accurate custom tune - should have usable range in both directions.

    user on MTBR: https://forums.mtbr.com/knolly/ext-s...k-1103710.html
    * he had to have the compression shim stack tweaked twice. EXT did it for free, but that didn't sound like a very accurate custom tune.

    user on MTBR: https://forums.mtbr.com/shocks-suspe...l#post13793032
    * had to have compression and rebound retuned. Again, for free, but again that didn't sound like an accurate custom tune.

    The other thing I noticed was that it seemed like most people on EXTs ended up using the stiffer of the 2 springs provided. It's great you get 2, but I personally would have wanted to have the softer one usable for daily riding, with the big one available for days at the bike park (support on smooth berms & bigger hits).

    Again, not doubting that it's a good shock, I just had enough doubts about the accuracy of the custom tune that it swayed me to go with Push. I'm sure I could have ended up with a similarly great feeling shock, but it would have cost me more, and my sense was that it would have required more fiddling on my part and taken longer to get it there. Although it would have been lighter.

  56. #1456
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    I do not know, based on what experience,"most people" ??? You conclude that the firmer spring is the one that they tend to use?

    You refer to this user of Storia, that happens to be quite satisfied and choose Storia over a Push 11-6???
    "I ordered a storia through Andrew. The storia came from Italy with the compression too firm and rebound too slow for my taste. Andrew re-tuned it for me for free and absolutely nailed the tune. The also ship it with 2 springs and 1 of them was way firmer than I could possibly use. He sawpped it for a different one at no charge. I highly recommend both the EXT and dealing with Brennan motor sports. Iíve had an 11/6 on a prior bike and would take the storia over that as I never needed a second compression circuit anyway. The storia is just as good and lighter."


    For me, and 5 other with EXT, it is actually opposite. For me the firmest spring I received was to firm, and went opposite and sent back to EXT to swap it for a softer one. So instead of having a 575 and 550 spring I traded the 575 for a 525lb spring.

    As mentioned before, the mid stroke support is so good that you will benefit from using softer spring.

    Quote Originally Posted by Andeh View Post
    The other thing I noticed was that it seemed like most people on EXTs ended up using the stiffer of the 2 springs provided. It's great you get 2, but I personally would have wanted to have the softer one usable for daily riding, with the big one available for days at the bike park (support on smooth berms & bigger hits).

  57. #1457
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rumblefish2010 View Post
    if you want to read about Murphy from Push and his advice about suspension set up and what he thinks riders are doing most wrong, try the link below.

    I think this is the best part of it, with the advice of set up:
    "Continuing to soften their suspension when it feels "harsh". It's counter-intuitive, but most times when your suspension feels harsh it's because it's too soft. Riding to low in the travel over bumps puts you in the more progressive part of the fork travel in the front, or more progressive part of the linkage rate in the rear. Stiffening the suspension causing it to ride higher in the stroke will often lead to a softer overall ride.
    Although not on a Sentinel..but looking at one to replace a Patrol w dpx2, this was my exact exp as well.

    I started with my riding weigh as my psi and it always felt stiff/harsh, now with riding weight plus 30-40psi, the bike feels so much more balanced

  58. #1458
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    Along that point, don't be afraid to use a good amount of LSC assuming you're at the correct sag. That was the trick to getting the stock shock to feel decent for me (at Transition's suggestion). Same principle... firm things up for low speed movements to keep the shock earlier in the softer part of the stroke.

  59. #1459
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andeh View Post
    Along that point, don't be afraid to use a good amount of LSC assuming you're at the correct sag. That was the trick to getting the stock shock to feel decent for me (at Transition's suggestion). Same principle... firm things up for low speed movements to keep the shock earlier in the softer part of the stroke.
    Great suggestion. How much LSC are you running on the rear shock? Im currently at 2 clicks from open.

  60. #1460
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    Running an 11-6 now, but what they recommended for me as a 175 lb rider was 185 psi, 10 clicks (from closed) rebound, 4 clicks (from closed) LSC. They also suggested at least the 0.86 volume token, and I chose to run the 1.02 for added bottom out support.

    I did try running as high as 230 psi with LSC either wide open or nearly open, and the lower pressure with more LSC felt better to me. Supple over fast bumps, but supportive in turns and rollers.

  61. #1461
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    I think I finally got my DPX2 figured out after two days at the bike park. For anyone who ordered recently and has the 2020, know the tune comes with a 0.9 spacer. That might be the same as the 2019...I don't know. I weigh about 195lb with gear and run:

    205 psi
    9 clicks of rebound from closed to open
    4 of LSC from open to firm

  62. #1462
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    Yeah I finally got mine figured out I replaced it with an X2. At least the DPX2 that came with my bike was totally crappy comparatively. I am hoping mine was a outlier. It did get a factory service and maybe I will try it again some day but the X2 with the recommended settings is so much nicer.

  63. #1463
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    Quote Originally Posted by xophere View Post
    Yeah I finally got mine figured out I replaced it with an X2. At least the DPX2 that came with my bike was totally crappy comparatively. I am hoping mine was a outlier. It did get a factory service and maybe I will try it again some day but the X2 with the recommended settings is so much nicer.
    What size X2 did you get? Did you have to make any modifications? I know Dirt Labs has a modified X2 specifically for the Transition Sentinel.

    Also, I though I remember reading that the X2 wasnt the best combination because its too linear of a shock and doesnt match the Sentinel linear leverage very well.

  64. #1464
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    Quote Originally Posted by jdadour View Post
    What size X2 did you get? Did you have to make any modifications? I know Dirt Labs has a modified X2 specifically for the Transition Sentinel.

    Also, I though I remember reading that the X2 wasnt the best combination because its too linear of a shock and doesnt match the Sentinel linear leverage very well.
    The ironic thing about that is all the Sentinels with coils on them.

    Sent from my Pixel 2 XL using Tapatalk

  65. #1465
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    Why would the X2 be bad for the Sentinel? Sure it has the potential to be very linear, but unlike a DHX2 or 11-6, you can tune it to be more progressive by using volume tokens (clips). Also, unlike the DPX2, it has adjustable high speed compression damping, which will help control how deep in the travel you go on big hits.

    I have an 11-6 on mine, and seriously considered an X2. If I did more jumping, I'd probably have gone with an X2 for bottom out support.

  66. #1466
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    If you're thinking about getting an aftermarket air shock for this bike, consider a dvo topaz. I bought one on sale for 430 shipped, and it feels substantially better than the dpx2, and I haven't really fiddled around with it. While it isn't as adjustable as the x2, it is 100% user servicable, and DVO is willing to help users reshim the shock to get the damping characteristics you're after, or you can mail it to them and have them do it for you.

    That being said, I'm running the stock tune and the shock feels substantially more plush, and doesn't blow through travel the same way my dpx2 did.

  67. #1467
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    I decided to try a coil out and Iím pretty damn happy. Already put it through some good tests and no complaints.

    Transition Sentinel-a8f8ad8e-d03d-4a19-a127-9018832ec349.jpg

  68. #1468
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    Quote Originally Posted by B3nnyH View Post
    If you're thinking about getting an aftermarket air shock for this bike, consider a dvo topaz. I bought one on sale for 430 shipped, and it feels substantially better than the dpx2, and I haven't really fiddled around with it. While it isn't as adjustable as the x2, it is 100% user servicable, and DVO is willing to help users reshim the shock to get the damping characteristics you're after, or you can mail it to them and have them do it for you.

    That being said, I'm running the stock tune and the shock feels substantially more plush, and doesn't blow through travel the same way my dpx2 did.
    Funny you should just mention this, because I had the same thought earlier in the week, and migrated over to the DVO Topaz thread to explore and discuss. Sounds like a great air shock, and I think I'm going to give it a shot.

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