Scout V3 Build Thread- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
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    Scout V3 Build Thread

    Transition finally released the Version 3 Scout, and by the looks of the numbers it's the Super Scout!

    Use this thread to share your builds, ride reviews and overall thoughts about the new Scout!

    Scout V3 Build Thread-p5pb18276475.jpg

    Scout V3 Build Thread-p5pb18276470.jpg

    Scout V3 Build Thread-p5pb18276474.jpg

    Scout V3 Build Thread-p5pb18276473.jpg

    Scout V3 Build Thread-p5pb18276516.jpg

    Scout V3 Build Thread-p5pb18276472.jpg

  2. #2
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    Not on the website that I can find. If itís real, Iím happy. Rather keep my Patrol than buy this.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mrallen View Post
    Not on the website that I can find. If itís real, Iím happy. Rather keep my Patrol than buy this.
    This bike could replace the Patrol! Its geo figures are damn close and it's overall size is bigger! Longer wheelbase, same size chainstays, longer reach, same HA, steeper SA. The SBG Scout was a very capable bike, these geo figures make it almost as capable as the Patrol. I bet with slightly less rear travel this is an all day pedaling bike that can hit the big stuff.......one bike quiver for sure!

    Scout V3 Build Thread-patrolcapture.jpg

  4. #4
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    Bikes are up on the TR website

    https://reviews.mtbr.com/2020-transi...weight-details


    https://www.pinkbike.com/news/first-...rbon-2020.html

    https://www.vitalmtb.com/product/gui...t-reviews/3767

    From the Vital MTB video

    Whatís Out for Mountain Biking in the Year 2020

    Saying that only 29er trail bikes are what people want or what matters. There are tons of 27.5 bikes that absolutely slay (with more on the way) and the people want 'em!

    The reason this bike exists!
    Last edited by BluePitch; 02-13-2020 at 11:29 AM.

  5. #5
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    Disappointed. Will keep my 2017.

    Just for starter, I would have liked if it was 130-140 with different shock stroke and a tad less slack.

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    $500 more than a carbon GX patrol. Does this not make sense to anyone else? I love the 140/150, but holy smokes $$$$$$$$

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jozz View Post
    Disappointed. Will keep my 2017.

    Just for starter, I would have liked if it was 130-140 with different shock stroke and a tad less slack.
    Yeah, for me 130-140 is the sweet spot for where I live. Hopefully it pedals really good. The wheelbase is so big now, wonder how it handles the tight stuff?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jozz View Post
    Disappointed. Will keep my 2017.

    Just for starter, I would have liked if it was 130-140 with different shock stroke and a tad less slack.
    I couldn't agree more. With this size you lose the playfulness without gaining the capability to get out of the chunk. The current Patrol is plenty efficient pedaling to me to make this a weird decision. I'm sure that others will disagree with me though. I was really hoping for something closer to the current version in carbon to swap all of my parts of the Patrol.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrallen View Post
    I couldn't agree more. With this size you lose the playfulness without gaining the capability to get out of the chunk. The current Patrol is plenty efficient pedaling to me to make this a weird decision. I'm sure that others will disagree with me though. I was really hoping for something closer to the current version in carbon to swap all of my parts of the Patrol.
    Definitely a west coast bike now.

  10. #10
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    I'm super keen on it. I think its an even better all-rounder now than ever before. Can't wait to see what they do to the rest of the range.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by toodles View Post
    I'm super keen on it. I think its an even better all-rounder now than ever before. Can't wait to see what they do to the rest of the range.
    I think this is what they were going for. The one bike quiver Scout. The OG Scout was a do it all bike, handled just about everything really good. It got a little shaken and stirred at the bike park but it was ok. The SBG Scout handled everything including bike park days. It looks like V3 can not only handle bike park, but could stomp it. Just hope it hasn't lost its low speed/technical/turn/poppy/playful nature that made it such a fun all day trail bike. The wheelbase is loooong, and a 64 degree HA on paper make it look like it would steer like an old 29er, floppy and vague. Waiting anxiously for real world reviews, or an actual test ride.

  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by BluePitch View Post
    Just hope it hasn't lost its low speed/technical/turn/poppy/playful nature that made it such a fun all day trail bike.
    bike magazine review

    https://www.bikemag.com/gear/mountai...cout-x01-6600/

    And in the end, I did figure out where, for me, the Scout comes to life: really steep trails. When pointed straight down, the Scout will duck and weave better than most big-wheel bikes will on similar terrain. When hauling ass, itís easier to two-wheel drift than a long-travel 29er, and it cuts into catch berms with precision. In the steeps, the Scout rules, but itís simply not as good on mellower trails. Itís much more speed-hungry and not as effortlessly roused by a leisurely stroll through the forest as it once was. As I said, grown-up Scout isnít easily entertained.

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jozz View Post
    bike magazine review

    https://www.bikemag.com/gear/mountai...cout-x01-6600/

    And in the end, I did figure out where, for me, the Scout comes to life: really steep trails. When pointed straight down, the Scout will duck and weave better than most big-wheel bikes will on similar terrain. When hauling ass, itís easier to two-wheel drift than a long-travel 29er, and it cuts into catch berms with precision. In the steeps, the Scout rules, but itís simply not as good on mellower trails. Itís much more speed-hungry and not as effortlessly roused by a leisurely stroll through the forest as it once was. As I said, grown-up Scout isnít easily entertained.
    Very honest review. Itís exactly what I was afraid of.

    Heís matured from a spirited little whippersnapper into a measured shredder. It takes a lot more to rile him than it used to. Sure, heíll still hit the average trailside jib, but itís not like it used to be. Scoutís playful innocence is lost. Heís on to bigger things.

  14. #14
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    Of the criticisms of the Scout I read, the only one that bothers me is the nit-pick on the brake routing not being internal. Ugh. Seriously - that's your complaint?

    It may not be what some were waiting for - but I think it is a compelling and interesting platform that I'd like to try out for myself. Dated changes aside I think it has the spirit of my old HD3 which I still think hit great marks as a toothy trail bike. Popped great. Some of the modernizing of the geo might really deliver.
    Working to stomp out redundancy, I repeat, working to stomp out redundancy.

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    As a 2019 Scout owner (custom build from the frame up), here are my current thoughts on the new one:

    Price: Old > New (over $3K for a frame?)
    Weight: New > Old (2019 is a pig no doubt)
    Frame Material: Old > New (this is my preference for alloy over carbon)
    Trunion Shock: Old > New (not a fan of trunion shocks)
    Seat Tube Angle: New > Old (I wanted the 2019 to have a slightly steeper STA)
    Heat Tube angle: Old > New (riding the 2019, I never thought to myself that I wished it was slacker and had a longer wheelbase)
    Rear Travel: Old > New (I never felt like I wanted more rear travel while riding the 2019)

    I think the 2020 is going to be a great bike for many people, but I will save the $3K for now and stick with the 2019. I think people considering the 2020 should also take a good look at the 2019 that is on sale right now.

  16. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carl Mega View Post
    Of the criticisms of the Scout I read, the only one that bothers me is the nit-pick on the brake routing not being internal. Ugh. Seriously - that's your complaint?
    The external rear brake routing was the biggest deciding factor for choosing my Patrol. It was the one thing that made me think that Transition knew what was up when building bikes. (the quality of the welds was the 2nd biggest factor - besides SBG, of course)
    We don't ride to add days to our life, we ride to add life to the days we have left here.

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    Quote Originally Posted by retswen View Post
    As a 2019 Scout owner (custom build from the frame up), here are my current thoughts on the new one:

    Price: Old > New (over $3K for a frame?)
    Weight: New > Old (2019 is a pig no doubt)
    Frame Material: Old > New (this is my preference for alloy over carbon)
    Trunion Shock: Old > New (not a fan of trunion shocks)
    Seat Tube Angle: New > Old (I wanted the 2019 to have a slightly steeper STA)
    Heat Tube angle: Old > New (riding the 2019, I never thought to myself that I wished it was slacker and had a longer wheelbase)
    Rear Travel: Old > New (I never felt like I wanted more rear travel while riding the 2019)

    I think the 2020 is going to be a great bike for many people, but I will save the $3K for now and stick with the 2019. I think people considering the 2020 should also take a good look at the 2019 that is on sale right now.

    People riding SBG Scout would adapt better to the V3 than those on OG Scout.

    edit: I'm all for external rear brake routing.

  18. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jozz View Post
    People riding SBG Scout would adapt better to the V3 than those on OG Scout.

    edit: I'm all for external rear brake routing.
    I owned the OG Scout and SBG Scout. The SBG Scout for me wasn't as fun as the OG Scout. It was good, just not like the original. SBG was very planted, had more traction, and overall much more stable bike than OG. Now V3 is an even more capable, planted and stable bike.......I do not posses the ability to tap into the V3, especially in the Northeast. We just don't have trail systems that can harness what this bike can do.

    I guess that's why I enjoyed the OG Scout so much. It had the right balance of size, playfulness, attitude to handle my trail system. Every once in a while I got in over my head it still had some reserve to bail me out though.

    I imagine V3 would make a great all around/one bike quiver. Especially with the option to go 150mm out back.

    It seems that the Scout is no longer a short travel 27.5 trail bike. Its now a mid travel trail bike. The change in character when you go with extra travel/reach/wheelbase takes the fun out of most of the trails I ride though. Would love to live somewhere that I could actually ride this version.....but Upstate NY lacks the flow and long descents people have in Cali, Colorado, Seattle.

    Bike looks really nice, and I see the direction TR went. I was really looking forward to owning another Scout......

  19. #19
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    I like it. What are the off the shelf 205 x 62.5 coil options? I can only find the CCDB available. Can the 205 x 65 Fox X2 be modified to fit? Or possibly the Rockshox Superdeluxe?

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    FWIW - when they drop a Smug - 130 rr, 150 frt, 65 HA, 77 SA and shorter wheelbase in all sizes - color me highly, highly interested. I demoed the original Scout and was surprised back in the day how well that bike could handle some really hairy stuff.

    Loooonger isn't necessarily better - but that depends on rider and regular trails ridden. For me - im learning that longer is better - but there's a limit to how long and don't think I will be happy w a 1 bike quiver going past 1200 WB.

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    Gone the days of the OG sort travel 27.5" trail bike (you can blame the industry for that..), if thats what you're looking, better look at 5010 or short travel 29er option...
    The new Scout is super aggressive trail/all mountain bike for steep, fast n' techy terrain, and it looks promising! im sure its still playful on some degree and hopefully it climbs good.

    Looking forward for comparison against the Bronson v3 and HD5.

    As for the 140/150 vs 150/160 option, when changing to the 'longer' mode, will it change the geo in some way, or the numbers stays the same?

    Quote Originally Posted by Carl Mega View Post
    Of the criticisms of the Scout I read, the only one that bothers me is the nit-pick on the brake routing not being internal. Ugh. Seriously - that's your complaint?
    For the asking price, they could push the extra mile and make it happen... in reality, how often people changing their brake cables or brakes..?

  22. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by Muddy-Runs View Post



    For the asking price, they could push the extra mile and make it happen... in reality, how often people changing their brake cables or brakes..?
    I would say that I'm about 50/50 on upgrading the brakes on the complete builds I bought. Up until a few years ago the brakes were always base or lower spec options. It hasn't been until recently we started getting decent options even on the entry or mid level builds. All of the brake options on the Scout V3 I would actually stick with, even the NX build with Code R's.

    When I bought my OG Scout for example, it came with Shimano Deores. They were quickly upgraded.

    Last bike I bought had Guide T's? Full internal routing on that bike, so I had to buy Srams bleeding Edge kit to put Guide RS's on.

    I like the external routing on brakes.

  23. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carl Mega View Post
    Of the criticisms of the Scout I read, the only one that bothers me is the nit-pick on the brake routing not being internal. Ugh. Seriously - that's your complaint?
    Quote Originally Posted by Muddy-Runs View Post
    For the asking price, they could push the extra mile and make it happen... in reality, how often people changing their brake cables or brakes..?
    I don't think it's a price thing. I think it's more of a preference thing. Some people prefer an externally routed brake hose (e.g. BluePitch). I can kind of understand it, but in my opinion, running a hose through the frame really is not as big of a deal as people make it out to be. Even on bikes without "tube in tube" internal guides, it usually only takes me a minute or two. Just feed it through and fish it out with a seal pick, then slide on some foam pipe insulation to silence any rattles. And even if it's externally routed, you'll still have to bleed them if you want to trim the hose.

    Hardly a deal breaker, though. I feel like it says a lot about how dialed a bike is when people are nitpicking things like cable routing.

  24. #24
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    As much as this is a really cool bike it does seem like an odd decision to make a hole in their lineup where their 27.5 trail bike used to be. Their 27.5 trail bike is now an all mountain bike that nudges kind of close to their current 27.5 enduro bike. And they already released the 2020 version "ONCOIL" Patrol, so it wouldn't seem like they would be ready to put out a Super Patrol anytime soon???

    Companies do seem to do this often, The bronson kept getting closer to the Nomad so they had to make the Solo to fill the gap. The 2019 Stumpy Evo had less travel, but was way more progressive geo than the 2019 Enduro. (and ppl overshocked the Evo) And because bike companies don't release all the new models all at once anymore you often have periods of overlap and/or holes in the lineup till other new models come out to "fix" the lineup...

    Seems like a confusing/frustrating customer experience to me?

    You'd think if Transition thought they had a "hole" in their lineup and needed something between the Scout and Patrol that they'd just release a new model? If they don't fill that hole soon they will have some customers buying the new scout who don't really want that much bike, or they will be going to someone else for their new trail bike.

    Now, to play devils advocate; we all have to admit how often we see over forked Scouts and Smugglers. SO it may be that Transition is just playing to what they think their customers want...? No trail bikes...

    Probably they will release their new DownCountry bike soon...?

  25. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by stiingya View Post
    And they already released the 2020 version "ONCOIL" Patrol, so it wouldn't seem like they would be ready to put out a Super Patrol anytime soon???
    My read: New Scout = a 2020 Trail bike

    On-Coil was an easy holding pattern for the Patrol while a 2021ish reboot happens

    I know everyone is comparing Scout to the Patrol and for sure the "this bike is good at.." venn diagram would have a lot of overlap - but I'd wager the kinematics, specifically the pedaling are notably distinct. I have a Patrol w/ coil (11/6) and I'd expect the Scout to pedal with more direct acceleration and be much more snappy/lively. I could be wrong tho.
    Working to stomp out redundancy, I repeat, working to stomp out redundancy.

  26. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carl Mega View Post
    My read: New Scout = a 2020 Trail bike

    I'd expect the Scout to pedal with more direct acceleration and be much more snappy/lively. I could be wrong tho.
    Sort of like a longer travel 27.5 Smuggler with a slacker HT. Haha

  27. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by kragu View Post
    Sort of like a longer travel 27.5 Smuggler with a slacker HT. Haha
    Smout?

  28. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by kamper11 View Post
    FWIW - when they drop a Smug - 130 rr, 150 frt, 65 HA, 77 SA and shorter wheelbase in all sizes - color me highly, highly interested.
    Should be a sweet one-bike option if you're right (and based on what they've done to the Scout), so long as they don't skimp on the tyre clearance like the last one!

  29. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by David R View Post
    Should be a sweet one-bike option if you're right (and based on what they've done to the Scout), so long as they don't skimp on the tyre clearance like the last one!
    Every bike will be 64į from here on out.

  30. #30
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    I'm not good at manuals on a trail bike, but I could not manual the v3 Scout in the parking lot. At all. It felt super planted. On the large Revel Rail, which has more travel, I at least got a couple turns of the cranks in before the front came back to earth. TR says v3 Scout is more party, but maybe this is the point in the night when everyone stumbles to the grocery store for 48 packs and I get a taxi home.

  31. #31
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    Looks like at the moment there's not many coil shock options in 205x62.5 (for 150mm rear travel) but possible to find them in 205x60/205x65... can i get the 205x65 version and 'over shocked' to 156mm (?), assuming the rear wheel not touching the ST/saddle, or better using 2.5mm spacer to reduce it to 205x62.5, or taking out the 2.5mm spacer from the 205x60, to make it 205x62.5 ?

    As for the 205x57.5 Fox X2 shock that come with the Scout, is there a spacer inside that i can take out to make it 205x62.5 ?
    Last edited by Muddy-Runs; 02-27-2020 at 04:02 AM.

  32. #32
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    I emailed Transition asking if there was a spacer in the stock shock. They confirmed there was, but didn't say which size. I didn't press the matter as I'm waiting to see what the Sentinel v2 looks like, and will probably end up with that (and probably be asking the same question then).

  33. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andeh View Post
    I emailed Transition asking if there was a spacer in the stock shock. They confirmed there was, but didn't say which size. I didn't press the matter as I'm waiting to see what the Sentinel v2 looks like, and will probably end up with that (and probably be asking the same question then).
    Makes me wonder why they couldn't make some kind of dual mounting option using the same shock rather than having to buy another shock to modify travel.

  34. #34
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    Metric shocks are designed to be the same eye to eye then limited with spacers, so on a stock V3 Scout you will just need to 'pop the air can' and remove the 5mm spacer. Because it's an X2, this does need a few custom tools but anywhere that's set up to service X2s can do it, and you don't have to go into the damper. We are offering the choice of rear travel free to Scout purchases.

  35. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by pedalsbikecare View Post
    Metric shocks are designed to be the same eye to eye then limited with spacers, so on a stock V3 Scout you will just need to 'pop the air can' and remove the 5mm spacer. Because it's an X2, this does need a few custom tools but anywhere that's set up to service X2s can do it, and you don't have to go into the damper. We are offering the choice of rear travel free to Scout purchases.
    That's weird on the RockShox air shocks and the DPX2 and DPS the spacer is in the damper, not in the air can. You need a damper rebuild to change the shaft travel. Cool if the X2 avoids that headache.

  36. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by pedalsbikecare View Post
    Metric shocks are designed to be the same eye to eye then limited with spacers, so on a stock V3 Scout you will just need to 'pop the air can' and remove the 5mm spacer. Because it's an X2, this does need a few custom tools but anywhere that's set up to service X2s can do it, and you don't have to go into the damper. We are offering the choice of rear travel free to Scout purchases.
    Does this hold true for the Rockshox Super Deluxe? And the Fox X2?

    So technically the Scout can use its stock shock for both travel configurations? Just have to remove the internal travel limiter?

    This makes it much more appealing if I could change the travel without buying a second shock.

  37. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by pedalsbikecare View Post
    Metric shocks are designed to be the same eye to eye then limited with spacers, so on a stock V3 Scout you will just need to 'pop the air can' and remove the 5mm spacer. Because it's an X2, this does need a few custom tools but anywhere that's set up to service X2s can do it, and you don't have to go into the damper. We are offering the choice of rear travel free to Scout purchases.
    Found this thread. Is this how you achieve the travel changes!

    https://forums.mtbr.com/shocks-suspe...s-1076592.html

  38. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by BluePitch View Post
    Found this thread. Is this how you achieve the travel changes!

    https://forums.mtbr.com/shocks-suspe...s-1076592.html
    Depends on the shock brand/model.

    My TriAir 3cr has a slotted 5mm spacer. You can get them in 2.5mm, 5mm and 7.5mm.


    Sent from my INE-LX2 using Tapatalk

  39. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jozz View Post
    Makes me wonder why they couldn't make some kind of dual mounting option using the same shock rather than having to buy another shock to modify travel.
    Looks like you can take out the spacer from the stock shock instead of buying new shock.

  40. #40
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jozz View Post
    Makes me wonder why they couldn't make some kind of dual mounting option using the same shock rather than having to buy another shock to modify travel.
    Quote Originally Posted by Muddy-Runs View Post
    Looks like you can take out the spacer from the stock shock instead of buying new shock.

    Two mounting holes one for each different travel would have been far easier for the end user, maybe not that easy for manufacturer.

    I have a GG that goes from 140mm to 130mm with a quick one bolt swap. The kinematics also get changed. 140 is plush, 130 is firm.

    You can also run 210x55 shock or 210x50 to go from 140/130 to 130/120.

  41. #41
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    Quote Originally Posted by BluePitch View Post
    Two mounting holes one for each different travel would have been far easier for the end user, maybe not that easy for manufacturer.

    I have a GG that goes from 140mm to 130mm with a quick one bolt swap. The kinematics also get changed. 140 is plush, 130 is firm.

    You can also run 210x55 shock or 210x50 to go from 140/130 to 130/120.
    ^^^
    That!

    I doubt that I would start removing spacer from the shock for a last minute visit at the bike park. With my Carbine I could go to 150mm with a bolt and crank up the Lyrik to 160mm and I was set. Took 1 minute.

  42. #42
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    The point made earlier is that flip chips also change geometry and/or the leverage curve because they change the position of the pivot point relative to other pivots. By making the change with the shock, everything else stays the same. I'm sure the design firm would have wanted more money to design a flip chip that added travel too. You read most reviews of bikes with flip chips, and they're all like, "We tried the other position for 1 or 2 rides then went back to the first one."

  43. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andeh View Post
    The point made earlier is that flip chips also change geometry and/or the leverage curve because they change the position of the pivot point relative to other pivots.
    That is what I'd want exactly. Just like the GG bikes. Trail mode and Shred mode. One inch more travel, half a click to a full click slacker, and more linear in longer travel. I've had two bikes like that and enjoyed the flexibility.

    On the other end of the spectrum, you got RMB ride 9 or something which is pushing things a bit too far.

  44. #44
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andeh View Post
    You read most reviews of bikes with flip chips, and they're all like, "We tried the other position for 1 or 2 rides then went back to the first one."
    Thats it eh, I think people are over-thinking things if they're expecting to change the travel to suit the nature of the ride (or mid ride maybe?!). I think things like fork tarvel/choice, tyre/wheel selection and overall bike build are going to make a bigger difference to how the bike rides than 10mm more/less travel in the back. If you really want to do that then a second shock isn't a terribly expensive option and could help exaggerate the difference if set up appropriately (eg lighter DPX2-style for short travel and X2 or coil for LT mode).

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    Eh, if TR made the Scout like a GG bike... then why would you buy the Scout since the frame costs 50% more?

    GG has the bike nerds end of the spectrum covered.

    TR is more about aggressive and fun all around bikes. You're not gonna be adjusting shock bolts while pounding Raniers in between shuttle runs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jozz View Post
    That is what I'd want exactly. Just like the GG bikes. Trail mode and Shred mode. One inch more travel, half a click to a full click slacker, and more linear in longer travel. I've had two bikes like that and enjoyed the flexibility.

    On the other end of the spectrum, you got RMB ride 9 or something which is pushing things a bit too far.
    I have a few choices of trails where I live. The place I end up riding the most is closest to home. Mellow but flowy singletrack. Its nice to put the shock at 130mm trail mode for there. Keeps the bike playful and poppy. The further I venture out the steeper and more gnarly it gets. Old school NE, NY gnar. Quick change to 140mm gravity mode. Literally a couple of seconds to make the switch. Probably wont switch it up during a ride, however, having the adjust ability is nice.

    The change in the kinematics is very noticeable. I would rather have the change in kinematics and the change in travel. Realistically is 10mm more at 150mm on the Scout worth the trouble if its the same feel as the 140mm?

    I don't think it would be worth the trouble if it actually doesn't feel different! 10mm is not a lot......then you gotta bump up the fork too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BluePitch View Post
    I have a few choices of trails where I live. The place I end up riding the most is closest to home. Mellow but flowy singletrack. Its nice to put the shock at 130mm trail mode for there. Keeps the bike playful and poppy. The further I venture out the steeper and more gnarly it gets. Old school NE, NY gnar. Quick change to 140mm gravity mode. Literally a couple of seconds to make the switch. Probably wont switch it up during a ride, however, having the adjust ability is nice.

    The change in the kinematics is very noticeable. I would rather have the change in kinematics and the change in travel. Realistically is 10mm more at 150mm on the Scout worth the trouble if its the same feel as the 140mm?

    I don't think it would be worth the trouble if it actually doesn't feel different! 10mm is not a lot......then you gotta bump up the fork too.
    It's more a "nice to have" than a "need to have" Like mentioned above, at that price point it would have been a nice feature.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jozz View Post
    That is what I'd want exactly. Just like the GG bikes. Trail mode and Shred mode. One inch more travel, half a click to a full click slacker, and more linear in longer travel. I've had two bikes like that and enjoyed the flexibility.
    The problem with this is that changing the travel will change the leverage ratio and progression of the frame, so you will likely need to adjust your spring rate, volume spacers, and damper settings for each position. I'd probably end up running two different shocks for short/long travel anyway, so that I could just unbolt one shock and bolt on the other without having to mess with the setup at all. If you want to adjust the geo too, you easily use some offset shock bushings on one or both of the shocks and swap those out when you swap the shock. Plus, you could choose two different shocks for each amount of travel. You could run a light weight air shock in the short travel position and a coil with 4 way adjusters in the long travel position and completely transform the character of the bike.

  49. #49
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    Quote Originally Posted by dlxah View Post
    The problem with this is that changing the travel will change the leverage ratio and progression of the frame, so you will likely need to adjust your spring rate, volume spacers, and damper settings for each position. I'd probably end up running two different shocks for short/long travel anyway, so that I could just unbolt one shock and bolt on the other without having to mess with the setup at all. If you want to adjust the geo too, you easily use some offset shock bushings on one or both of the shocks and swap those out when you swap the shock. Plus, you could choose two different shocks for each amount of travel. You could run a light weight air shock in the short travel position and a coil with 4 way adjusters in the long travel position and completely transform the character of the bike.
    Yes GG purposely built in different leverage ratios to the different travel settings.....that's the whole point. One shock, two travel length settings with a different feel. Having two travel settings with the same kinematics and only 10mm of difference is kind of a waste.

    By the way..........I'm a huge TR fan, I owned the OG Scout and SBG Scout, will probably build up a V3 Scout...maybe. I'm not here bashing, I'm here listening and learning.

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    Hey everybody - we have seen a big increase in aftermarket shock purchases/upgrades/changes over the past years and with that we encounter a lot of "can you fit this size shock" questions. We sell the Scout at 140mm because we think it's rad like that. But it's still rad if you want a little bit more travel, and we specifically designed it with the clearance to run that 62.5mm / 150mm travel setup because it's an option we knew people were going to want.

    We don't see it as any kind of "on the fly" adjustment and don't really expect the same person to run both travel configurations... at least not for the most part. One sweet option (and a possible exception to that) is to run the stock air shock for 140mm travel and a second coil shock for 150mm travel. That way you have two distinctly different setups for your one bike. But other than that situation, we really expect people to pick the travel that they like best and stick with it. It's really no different than fork travel changes... we sell it at 140mm with a 150mm fork and if you want to bump it up, you can rebuild the fork/shock and move up that extra 10mm. It's just a compatibility option... not really an adjustment.

    Cheers!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Transition Bikes View Post
    Hey everybody - we have seen a big increase in aftermarket shock purchases/upgrades/changes over the past years and with that we encounter a lot of "can you fit this size shock" questions. We sell the Scout at 140mm because we think it's rad like that. But it's still rad if you want a little bit more travel, and we specifically designed it with the clearance to run that 62.5mm / 150mm travel setup because it's an option we knew people were going to want.

    We don't see it as any kind of "on the fly" adjustment and don't really expect the same person to run both travel configurations... at least not for the most part. One sweet option (and a possible exception to that) is to run the stock air shock for 140mm travel and a second coil shock for 150mm travel. That way you have two distinctly different setups for your one bike. But other than that situation, we really expect people to pick the travel that they like best and stick with it. It's really no different than fork travel changes... we sell it at 140mm with a 150mm fork and if you want to bump it up, you can rebuild the fork/shock and move up that extra 10mm. It's just a compatibility option... not really an adjustment.

    Cheers!

    Thanks for chiming in and explaining!

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    As i see this, the purpose of this option in the Scout, unlike GG bikes that are '2 in 1 bikes', is to extend it to 150r/160f for the ones that feels the need for extra travel, while keeping the same geometry.
    I doubt ppl that changing to 150mm (and 160mm fork) will jump back and forward between these two settings... its more how you build the bike and what purpose you using them for.

    @Transition Bikes, got couple of questions -
    can i 'over shocked' it with 205x65 to make it 156mm (not many options at the moment in 205x62.5) ? and if i change the shock to 150mm while keeping the fork at 150mm, is it gonna change the geometry?

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    Anyone got comments on the Fox X2 vs RS shock on the Scout? I was planning on getting the frame but it comes w the X2 and that shock gets a lot of hate online. I wonder if it would be easier to get the GX build... But I planned to move everything from my sbg scout over

    My only beef w the RS during the demo was no climb switch.

    I have the DPX2 on my 2018 scout. It's fine.

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    Every shock has it's detractors online. Get the frame and see if you like it. If not, you'll be able to sell the X2 for $$$ because there's way more people out there who love Fox than love RS. Plus it's a super rare X2 Performance Elite, so it's got all the adjustments of the Factory without the ugly brown Kashima.

    That said, if you really think you won't like it, Transition's complete builds seem to offer pretty good discount from buying individual components and building up. The X01 appears to be about a $600 value when I checked. So you could get the GX build and sell off the few things you don't like pretty easily.

  55. #55
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    Quote Originally Posted by Andeh View Post
    Every shock has it's detractors online. Get the frame and see if you like it. If not, you'll be able to sell the X2 for $$$ because there's way more people out there who love Fox than love RS. Plus it's a super rare X2 Performance Elite, so it's got all the adjustments of the Factory without the ugly brown Kashima.

    That said, if you really think you won't like it, Transition's complete builds seem to offer pretty good discount from buying individual components and building up. The X01 appears to be about a $600 value when I checked. So you could get the GX build and sell off the few things you don't like pretty easily.
    Yeh if I wasn't attached to my Cura brakes and Spank cockpit and wheelset (mostly the brakes tho) I would sell my SBG complete and it'd be easy. I suppose I could swap parts from the GX build and sell a complete aluminum SBG bike. The extra $200 tax sucks, unless I grab one from somewhere in Oregon.

    I was mostly concerned about maintenance. The Fox seems like a PITA for DIY maintenance and Fox service is... Blah.

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  56. #56
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    fwiw, I had an X2 some years back and I thought it was the best performing air shock I ever used.
    Working to stomp out redundancy, I repeat, working to stomp out redundancy.

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    FYI... Larsí reply when I asked his opinion on the performance of the x2 vs SD on the new Scout:


    ďThe FX2 is going to offer a lot more support and control in both compression and rebound. The Deluxe is a fantastic shock and does just fine, however the FX2 is superior in it's adjustment range and ability to quickly tune for different types of terrain.

    Cheers!
    LARSSTERNBERG (marketing)Ē


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    Yes I read some reviews and the X2 gets more thumbs up on performance... though some people complain it's overwhelming to setup if you're not into that sort of thing (ahh I get impatient too, want to ride rather than fiddling).

    I also noticed Skye built his new Scout with the DPX2. He seems to go for minimal weight.

    After going back to my SBG, my favorite thing about the new Scout is the seat post insertion. You know, more insertion... usually feels good. The last two weeks were not kind to my savings.. so maybe I just get the OneUp 180mm post for now... Inslee just closed all schools until Apr 24 which means I'm not going on any business travel -> more riding time but also less income.

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    Hey guys, I'm really close to pulling the trigger on this bike. Do you need to be a pro to have fun on this thing? I'm hoping for a very lively, fun, poppy ride. But I'm thinking, like others, that maybe its geo has gotten so long and aggressive that in order to have fun on it, you need to be on some super gnarly stuff. I'm a slightly above average rider looking for a fun ride. Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated! Coming off a Bronson V3.

  60. #60
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbbg View Post
    Hey guys, I'm really close to pulling the trigger on this bike. Do you need to be a pro to have fun on this thing? I'm hoping for a very lively, fun, poppy ride. But I'm thinking, like others, that maybe its geo has gotten so long and aggressive that in order to have fun on it, you need to be on some super gnarly stuff. I'm a slightly above average rider looking for a fun ride. Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated! Coming off a Bronson V3.
    I think this is the most honest review I have read about the Scout.

    The two things that stood out in the article were

    Today, Scout is all grown up. His soft features have been replaced by a strong, chiseled, carbon-fiber body. Heís matured from a spirited little whippersnapper into a measured shredder. It takes a lot more to rile him than it used to. Sure, heíll still hit the average trailside jib, but itís not like it used to be. Scoutís playful innocence is lost. Heís on to bigger things.


    And in the end, I did figure out where, for me, the Scout comes to life: really steep trails. When pointed straight down, the Scout will duck and weave better than most big-wheel bikes will on similar terrain. When hauling ass, itís easier to two-wheel drift than a long-travel 29er, and it cuts into catch berms with precision. In the steeps, the Scout rules, but itís simply not as good on mellower trails. Itís much more speed-hungry and not as effortlessly roused by a leisurely stroll through the forest as it once was. As I said, grown-up Scout isnít easily entertained.


    I wanted this bike so bad, but I'm like the writer of this article.....I can't use this bike as it's intended on my local trails.......

    https://www.bikemag.com/gear/mountai...cout-x01-6600/

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    Thanks for the quick reply BluePitch! This is the review that scared me away. I was sooo looking forward to this bike. When he said it may feel lively and poppy to a pro rider but maybe not so much for us mere mortals, I was like crap.. I'm out. Was just hoping some people out there could debunk that lol!

  62. #62
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbbg View Post
    Thanks for the quick reply BluePitch! This is the review that scared me away. I was sooo looking forward to this bike. When he said it may feel lively and poppy to a pro rider but maybe not so much for us mere mortals, I was like crap.. I'm out. Was just hoping some people out there could debunk that lol!
    If it helps any, I asked Skye why he had the DPX2 on his build (rather than the X2) and he said it was poppier.

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    So, I think the Bike Mag guys want the bike to be something different than it is. If I remember right, they specifically complained about having to ride it aggressively on flatter terrain, especially when they were feeling lazy. I suspect that's mostly due to the slack head angle. It will feel like it requires more body in turns than your Bronson, as it's 1 degree slacker. But the Bronson has essentially no progression (from the frame), so it will feel a lot less poppy than a bike with 25% progression like the Scout.

    When I demo'd a Megatower, which also has a 1 degree steeper HTA than my Sentinel, I definitely noticed it was a bit twitchier in tighter windy trails. But it was also less stable on steep rolls and in chunk. I expect Bronson vs. Scout probably will feel very similar.

    The Vital early review was much more positive. I think it really depends on riding style... do you drive the bike, or do you let it drive you.

  64. #64
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbbg View Post
    Thanks for the quick reply BluePitch! This is the review that scared me away. I was sooo looking forward to this bike. When he said it may feel lively and poppy to a pro rider but maybe not so much for us mere mortals, I was like crap.. I'm out. Was just hoping some people out there could debunk that lol!
    I'm still very interested in the Scout, however, I would be interested in it replacing my Bronson as my "big" bike. It would be the bike I would take to the bike park, or trips to places that I could use it. We have a few places here and there that aren't lift access, but have some opportunity to get up to speed and have some fun. I certainly can't come close to utilizing it as its intended.....I'm a little too old and mediocre in skill set.

    I know that bikes have to evolve and change to meet the demands of an ever changing sport. I just was so happy with the OG Scout......SBG was good, but not as fun as OG..If V3 is taking SBG a step further.....its not the playful/snappy/punchy/jibby/rascal/hooligan bike I want, its a planted/go big/ride huge/huck it bike........

    I live in Upstate NY and ride here and NE. Our trail systems are old hiking trails, old horse trails......you gotta grind your way to the top, then grind your way back down. If you have a big planted bike that needs some speed to come alive it takes the fun out of the trails. OG Scout was at home here, it was so easy to pick up, move, hop, pop off all the small trail features, and then when the small opportunity came up to get rowdy it handled it great!

    I'm sure the Scout V3 is fun in certain parts of the country, and I think TR built an absolute weapon for their home trails. Just not sure its an east coast bike?

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    I still am very interested as well! That's why I was asking for any other's impressions. Yeah, I was hoping it would be replacing my bronson, but not as a "big bike." I actually wanted a smaller more poppy bike and thought the 140/150 would be more trail fun than the 150/160 bronson. I am in Utah though, so we probably have some steeper stuff than you. Not sure though. I love hitting the bike parks out here too. I'm not doing the double blacks often or taking 40 ft gaps. I ride the blue line flowy jump trails that have tabletop jumps and things of that nature. I'm sure it would be a great bike out here. Just wanted it to be more trail fun(meaning the smaller travel would soak up less of the trail) than the bronson but could still rock the bike park, which i'm sure it can do. Thanks for all the input you guys, really appreciate it!

  66. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbbg View Post
    I still am very interested as well! That's why I was asking for any other's impressions. Yeah, I was hoping it would be replacing my bronson, but not as a "big bike." I actually wanted a smaller more poppy bike and thought the 140/150 would be more trail fun than the 150/160 bronson. I am in Utah though, so we probably have some steeper stuff than you. Not sure though. I love hitting the bike parks out here too. I'm not doing the double blacks often or taking 40 ft gaps. I ride the blue line flowy jump trails that have tabletop jumps and things of that nature. I'm sure it would be a great bike out here. Just wanted it to be more trail fun(meaning the smaller travel would soak up less of the trail) than the bronson but could still rock the bike park, which i'm sure it can do. Thanks for all the input you guys, really appreciate it!
    I always thought for the travel of my Bronson it was very manageable as a trail bike. For a 160/150 bike it is definitely playful and didnít suck the life out of the trails. I had a Nomad V3 that was 160/165 and it was so damn planted everyday trail riding was boring. I think the Scout V3 with its wheelbase, HA, SBG positioning, and long reach is gravitating towards that extra planted ride. Which can be super beneficial at high speeds, but with a 1 degree slacker HA, and 33mm longer wheelbase than a Bronson I see it being glued to the ground at the speed I would be riding it the most. Iím like you when it comes to the bike park. I ride mostly flowy table top trails that has little consequence if you donít clear the whole jump. I avoid doubles unless there smaller. Thatís where the Scout V3 would be at home though, high speed bike park style riding. I would love to have a Scout V3 for bike park duty, but am very skeptical about trail manners. I thought SBG Scout was a great trail bike, but it lost a little of the OG playfulness. If V3 is even more planted than SBG it may not be as fun as a daily trail bike. I hope Iím entirely wrong and V3 is a great all around bike. Thatís why my interest is still high. I just donít want to be the first to take the plunge. I did that with OG and SBG Scout.......Iíll wait on this one.

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    We're pretty much in the same boat then. Side note, I was reading fanatiks review and they said the scout climbs great. Which is a need of mine cause I don't really care for climbing. However, I read their review on the latest patrol and they said that bike pretty much sucked at climbing. Should check those reviews out. The geo numbers are so similar I don't understand how they can say the scout climbs fine and the patrol doesn't. Same HTA, wheelbase is actually longer on the lg scout, STA almost identical. Maybe the suspension is setup better for climbing..

  68. #68
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbbg View Post
    We're pretty much in the same boat then. Side note, I was reading fanatiks review and they said the scout climbs great. Which is a need of mine cause I don't really care for climbing. However, I read their review on the latest patrol and they said that bike pretty much sucked at climbing. Should check those reviews out. The geo numbers are so similar I don't understand how they can say the scout climbs fine and the patrol doesn't. Same HTA, wheelbase is actually longer on the lg scout, STA almost identical. Maybe the suspension is setup better for climbing..
    I went to buy the frame yesterday from TR, anticipating we may get a shelter in place order and I'll have time to build a bike up. Except they are closed on Mondays. But Skye was there in the parking lot and said the suspension is different from prior TR bikes. Before the sag had to be between 17 and 19mm. Now it can be from 25 to 35 percent, and he is running 27 percent, and it still works great. I personally didn't think the bike was any worse than the SBG at climbing. I can't say it was better.

    You will use less rear travel with less sag. But per Vorsprung, set the sag at whatever feels good and don't worry about how much travel you are using. I'm glad the bike still behaves reasonably in a wide range because I'll just run the minimum sag for maximum pop.

    The OG Scout was a different beast I think. It was fun on the lame local trails I had before moving to Bellingham. I think the 2017 was not as fun, but it was better everywhere else I rode.

    Time to build this frame up!

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  69. #69
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    Quote Originally Posted by fitek View Post
    I went to buy the frame yesterday from TR, anticipating we may get a shelter in place order and I'll have time to build a bike up. Except they are closed on Mondays. But Skye was there in the parking lot and said the suspension is different from prior TR bikes. Before the sag had to be between 17 and 19mm. Now it can be from 25 to 35 percent, and he is running 27 percent, and it still works great. I personally didn't think the bike was any worse than the SBG at climbing. I can't say it was better.

    You will use less rear travel with less sag. But per Vorsprung, set the sag at whatever feels good and don't worry about how much travel you are using. I'm glad the bike still behaves reasonably in a wide range because I'll just run the minimum sag for maximum pop.

    The OG Scout was a different beast I think. It was fun on the lame local trails I had before moving to Bellingham. I think the 2017 was not as fun, but it was better everywhere else I rode.

    Time to build this frame up!

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    Canít wait to here how it rides after you get past the honeymoon stage. First month you look past the minor stuff, then start nitpicking, and you either accept it or get a divorce.

    Some honeymoons last awhile, others are over quick. Hope you get some good ride time in a give us a good honest ride report!

    Congrats on the new bike!

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    Grats man!!! Look forward to some pictures and ride reports!

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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbbg View Post
    We're pretty much in the same boat then. Side note, I was reading fanatiks review and they said the scout climbs great. Which is a need of mine cause I don't really care for climbing. However, I read their review on the latest patrol and they said that bike pretty much sucked at climbing. Should check those reviews out. The geo numbers are so similar I don't understand how they can say the scout climbs fine and the patrol doesn't. Same HTA, wheelbase is actually longer on the lg scout, STA almost identical. Maybe the suspension is setup better for climbing..
    I have an SBG Patrol and found it very surprising how well it climbs. Our terrain doesn't have a lot of elevation, so you're constantly pedaling. As a consequence having a bike the you don't have to flip the switch on the shock to pedal is a requirement for me. My 2017 Stumpjumper sucked at pedaling without the shock in trail mode so badly that it sent me looking for bikes with DW Link and Yeti suspensions. If I hadn't been able to ride a guy's Patrol a few times, I would never have believed it pedaled as well as it does. I have heard that the coil version bobs more than one with an air shock, but with an air shock, I have no complaints.

  72. #72
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    Quote Originally Posted by mrallen View Post
    I have an SBG Patrol and found it very surprising how well it climbs. Our terrain doesn't have a lot of elevation, so you're constantly pedaling. As a consequence having a bike the you don't have to flip the switch on the shock to pedal is a requirement for me. My 2017 Stumpjumper sucked at pedaling without the shock in trail mode so badly that it sent me looking for bikes with DW Link and Yeti suspensions. If I hadn't been able to ride a guy's Patrol a few times, I would never have believed it pedaled as well as it does. I have heard that the coil version bobs more than one with an air shock, but with an air shock, I have no complaints.
    Climbing is one of those terms that has a lot of meanings for different riders/parts of the country/trail systems. I have very few areas here that have long sustained climbs. We have mostly short/punchy/technical/tricky climbs that require more balance/momentum/track stand style climbing and thatís why Iím cautiously waiting on Scout V3. Big, long wheelbase bikes are not easy to navigate the roots and rocks infested trails we call home. I did like the SBG Scout for this style of climbing. It was very balanced and easy to track stand and worked well with short punchy climbing. Not sure how it pedaled over long sustained stuff?

    I would guess the suspension has more mid support to keep it lively, but itís still a long wheelbase, slack HA bike.......really need some real world rider reports.

  73. #73
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbbg View Post
    The geo numbers are so similar I don't understand how they can say the scout climbs fine and the patrol doesn't. Same HTA, wheelbase is actually longer on the lg scout, STA almost identical. Maybe the suspension is setup better for climbing..
    The suspension kinematics play a bigger part in how efficiently a bike climbs than the geometry, for the most part. Eg; SC Bronson and Tallboy have similar HTA, STA, wheelbase etc, I haven't ridden either but I'd suspect they're two different animals when it comes to putting power to the ground.

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    Really want this frame to replace my Nomad 2. Seems ideal.

    Was considering the 5010 until i saw the Scout, just seems better all round for less money.

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    Quote Originally Posted by David R View Post
    The suspension kinematics play a bigger part in how efficiently a bike climbs than the geometry, for the most part. Eg; SC Bronson and Tallboy have similar HTA, STA, wheelbase etc, I haven't ridden either but I'd suspect they're two different animals when it comes to putting power to the ground.
    Totally agree with this, however, a big wheelbase slack HA bike will struggle with tight switchbacks, changing directions, getting redirected no matter how efficient the pedal platform is. Thatís why I mentioned in my previous post about what people consider climbing.

    Long sustained fire road climbs the suspension kinematics matter much more than Geo figures.

    Steep single track climbs need both, good geo good kinematics.

    Short blocky/punchy/techy/switchback filled chunck trails need more geo than kinematics.

    If someone in Florida said they needed an efficient climbing bike it would be different than someone in Colorado saying they needed a good climbing bike.

  76. #76
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    Quote Originally Posted by robj20 View Post
    Really want this frame to replace my Nomad 2. Seems ideal.

    Was considering the 5010 until i saw the Scout, just seems better all round for less money.
    Just curious, what about the scout makes you think its better all around than the 5010. Asking cause the three bikes i'm looking at are the Scout, SC 5010, and the yeti SB140. The Scout is still top of the list but the others could be great options for me. I've had a new version 5010 prior to the bronson. Miss the 5010.. Though yeti has never been a brand I've looked to, the geo and supsension on the sb140 looks great. Still has that steep STA but with a more moderate HTA and wheelbase than the scout. Maybe it would be more playful because of that?? I know they are supposed to climb well. Either way, Transition is having a demo in St. George Utah next monday that i'm going to try to make it to. Hopefully it doesn't get cancelled.

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    For me it will be the fact is have wanted a 150 fork so the scout designed for one is a bonus.
    Super short seat tube so even with my short legs I can run a good length dropper.
    I think the geo of the scout will better suite me also, I like the downhills more than the up, but also do a fair bit of peddaling.

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    I'll tell you why I went with the Scout vs the Revel Rail and Guerrilla Gravity bikes.

    I used to have a Suppressor and the OG Scout. OG Scout for lame multi use san Fran peninsula trails and dirt jumping. Suppressor for PNW.

    The OG Scout was stolen and insurance paid for a 2017, which was squishier (I had a patrol build kit too). It sucked as a DJ, but I got a BMX instead. There was less difference, so I sold the Suppressor.

    SBG Scout got squishier yet. But still, I liked it better than 2017 anyway. It handled beautifully downhill and rear suspension was better.

    Now we get to the carbon scout.

    I still really want to throw a leg over a GG Shred Dogg and Megatrail. The Shredd Dogg could be great for flow trails and work as a slope style type bike. Pedaling a real slope style bike or DJ around town to jumps sucks. I could have the Megatrail rear end for chunky stuff. but I'd end up in a two bike situation again, which is expensive, or swapping components, which honestly I won't do.

    So even though the carbon Scout is pricier than the GG, it does the job of two bikes, which is cheaper. It's also very sexy looking.

    Revel Rail is the best pedaling Enduro bike I've tried but I like aggressive modern geo better and it's geo is a bit more conservative. Those of you on the fence might give that a shot.

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  79. #79
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    Anyone that has had VPP or indeed a Nomad, how does the giddyup and a Scout compare.
    I only have one bike and mostly ride, Trail Centre type stuff, black routes no problem. But also do a fair bit of miles on fire road type stuff so it needs to be good to peddle.

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    I "finished" my Carbon Scout build... Meaning I spent a couple hours transferring parts over from my SBG Scout, then wasted 3 hours trying to route the dropper. 2015 and 2017 Scouts, dropper took like five minutes. SBG and v3 make you route the cable through a 120 degree bend, and the finish is rough inside the carbon frame so it hangs up on stuff. I made a tool out of a delrin rod and finally got it through but decided it's midnight and I'll do my first ride with the old school post for now.

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  81. #81
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    Quote Originally Posted by fitek View Post
    I "finished" my Carbon Scout build... Meaning I spent a couple hours transferring parts over from my SBG Scout, then wasted 3 hours trying to route the dropper. 2015 and 2017 Scouts, dropper took like five minutes. SBG and v3 make you route the cable through a 120 degree bend, and the finish is rough inside the carbon frame so it hangs up on stuff. I made a tool out of a delrin rod and finally got it through but decided it's midnight and I'll do my first ride with the old school post for now.
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    Do they not have tubes for the internal routing?

  82. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by robj20 View Post
    Anyone that has had VPP or indeed a Nomad, how does the giddyup and a Scout compare.
    I only have one bike and mostly ride, Trail Centre type stuff, black routes no problem. But also do a fair bit of miles on fire road type stuff so it needs to be good to peddle.
    Yes, I have owned several VPP bikes. I used to have a Nomad 3, which wasn't the greatest climber, it sat low in its sag and didn't have enough mid support. It got the job done, and was rideable/manageable. They have addressed these issues with the N4 and its lower mounted shock. I currently have a Bronson V3 which is a much better climber than my Nomad 3 despite having similar travel figures. This also has the lower mounted shock and it has a ton of mid support which makes the bike ride high in its travel. Far more efficient climber, especially when you consider its 160/150 travel.

    OG Scout and SBG Scout were not bad climbing bikes. I think this had more to do with the lack of travel out back. 125 or 130 there is not a lot of travel to wallow around in the mid support. The suspension is active, it tends to bob a little. For me the SBG Scout was the best slow speed technical climbing bike I have owned until a little while ago. The SBG really put you in a position where you were over the pedals, weight on the handlebars, and it was very easy to balance/track-stand because of the body positioning. It was never super efficient, or speedy. It was more of a keep the momentum going and lumber you way to the top. That being said I also owned a 5010 V2 that had similar travel to the Scout and the 5010 was an efficient and sporty climber. Each pedal stroke had a purpose. 5010 V3 is supposed to be and even better climber after they addressed the geo figures and got it up to today's standards.

  83. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by robj20 View Post
    Do they not have tubes for the internal routing?
    Up to the BB yes. After that you have to stick your finger into the bb to try and get the cable to turn 120 degrees and then as you push it farther it will get hung up at points and then try to enter the top tube. I took a delrin rod and drilled a hole in the end so I could get it over the end of the cable and guide it out the seatpost.

    However I'm not sure how to do this one-up dropper install. The instructions have no pictures and the text has me scratching my head. My prior dropper had a screw on cylinder to secure the cable inside the dropper actuator. Nothing here.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BluePitch View Post
    Climbing is one of those terms that has a lot of meanings for different riders/parts of the country/trail systems. I have very few areas here that have long sustained climbs. We have mostly short/punchy/technical/tricky climbs that require more balance/momentum/track stand style climbing and thatís why Iím cautiously waiting on Scout V3. Big, long wheelbase bikes are not easy to navigate the roots and rocks infested trails we call home. I did like the SBG Scout for this style of climbing. It was very balanced and easy to track stand and worked well with short punchy climbing. Not sure how it pedaled over long sustained stuff?

    I would guess the suspension has more mid support to keep it lively, but itís still a long wheelbase, slack HA bike.......really need some real world rider reports.
    Excellent point. My terrain matches your description pretty much bang on. That's why I tried to be careful to describe pedaling characteristics versus climbing.

    To try to make it clear. The Patrol pedals much better than I expected and I don't feel the need to flip the switch on the trail for my terrain. Climbing with the switch open is also very good as you maintain traction well. Now, it is a longer bike with a slack HA so tight up hill switchbacks are more challenging. This would also apply to the new Scout since the WB is actually longer than the current Patrol. One thing I notice is that WB length cuts both ways when tech climbing. Sometimes things are actually easier with a longer WB depending on how the obstacles are spaced. In general though, I find the Patrol climbs just fine on the trail. For fire road climbs I would probably flip the switch, but that applies to almost every bike and probably would apply to the new Scout too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fitek View Post
    However I'm not sure how to do this one-up dropper install. The instructions have no pictures and the text has me scratching my head. My prior dropper had a screw on cylinder to secure the cable inside the dropper actuator. Nothing here.
    Isn't the OneUp a reverse setup? Meaning the ferrule on the cable fit in the bottom of the post and the cable is cut/fixed at the lever?

  86. #86
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jozz View Post
    Isn't the OneUp a reverse setup? Meaning the ferrule on the cable fit in the bottom of the post and the cable is cut/fixed at the lever?
    That is what I figured out at lunch today. But my lever expects a ferrule. I don't want to spend sixty bucks on another lever. I see there is a ZTTO lever that is popular and cheap but with current coronavirus disruption I'm going to have to wait a long while to get one (eBay estimates between April and May delivery, hah).

    I'm trying to figure out how I can add a ferrule. I wonder if the screw on ferrule from my old dropper (which broke) will work... But for that I need more cable inner. Will dig through my parts bin. I was hoping to ride tonight, damn.

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    I've got a couple Wolf Tooth levers sitting un-used in my parts box, one "light action" and one regular. I personally prefer the Bike Yoke and OneUp ones. If you want to buy one cheap, send me a PM.

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    I figured I'd need a shorty bottle and a side load cage since the bikes I looked at have a tight fit in the frame. Nope, tons of clearance. This bottle barely fit on the SBG frame.

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    Unfortunately my Cygolite metra bar clamp does NOT clear the top tube with only a 10mm spacer and 20mm rise bars (but the clamp goes on the bar where it has no rise... The bars are shaped such that I can't attach it anywhere else). The thumb screw hits the top tube.

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    Ok first ride, in the honeymoon phase still. Note, this build reuses my SBG Scout parts, other than my dropper (which, after I was balking at spending the money on the 210mm OneUp, conveniently broke). Fox 36 fit4, Cura brakes, x01 11 speed, heavy Spank vibrocore wheels, minion dhf dhr.

    I paid Fanatik to setup my derailleur after I failed at it, otherwise all wrenching done by moi. Well worth the $25 labor. Only the dropper install sucked.

    Did my short loop at Galby, same loop I did a few days ago on the SBG Scout, same as I did with demo carbon Scout gx build, Revel Rail, and GG Smash. Fire road climb to warm up on blue line at cedar dust jumps, then hit the black, then traverse across on Bandito (some big roots to climb up) then up on the switch backs of Tough Love, down the chunkiness of Cheech and Chongs and Methlab.

    I'm about 143 lbs and pumped the rear shock to 150psi. I forgot my calipers but eyeballed it at 25 percent. There are many adjustments on the X2. I just left them all in the middle, which is where they were out of the box. I slowed down the rear rebounds (yes, there are two) one click after a few runs, and sped up the front one click.

    I like the seated size. It fits me better. I couldn't tell the reach was longer descending.

    Im glad I went with the frame. I like the X2 better than the RS on the GX build. Instead of open and locked out, it's open and firm, but firm wasn't really all that firm. Prefer to climb in firm for sure on the fire road, on the trail could go either way. On the RS I wasn't happy with either setting on Bandito or Tough Love. Whew, that was my one complaint.

    The modulation on the Curas and the SRAM code on the GX are both very good. I'm glad I sold my Shimanos.

    I forget what cranks are on the GX build but my TR sourced RF creak a bunch. I cleaned and lubed them and it helps a bit but eventually I will get fed up and get Shimano cranks.

    I thought the bike climbed as well as the SBG Scout on technical bits. You have a lot of leeway with body English and your weight stays over the front so well, it's no fuss. There's no super tight switchbacks on tough love, so can't comment on wheelbase.

    I nearly wiped out at the start of the blue jump line because the thing popped so much. I entered with plenty of speed to make clearing things easier and went heavy on the preload. Welp, don't need it. I'm used to a squishy, energy sucking feel out of an MTB and this was not that. I recall the demo GX build feeling very balanced and predictable. My setup felt like I was on a trampoline. This round goes to the stock GX build.

    I recall when I demoed the SBG two years ago, what I remembered most was how much fun berms were compared to pre SBG. Same deal here, steps it up a notch. Windey downhill sections felt great too. Was easy to get a rhythm. It's like going to a more shaped ski.

    If you hate that floppy feel out of your front wheel, stay away. It is slack AF.

    Black jump line, I had less luck. I gotta get the suspension tuned better. I had this dialed on my SBG. Definitely some bucking going on.

    After the black line, including some nice cases, I checked the travel o-ring. I used 80 percent. Pretty sure I knock that o ring off on the SBG Scout on a normal ride. Maybe I should have run higher pressure on the SBG? But then IIRC the suspension behaves funky. Carbon Scout is more forgiving on the setup.

    Highlight of the ride was definitely the chunkier down though. Felt like hitting a groove through moguls, like skiing through the woods doing tight little turns left right left right left right.

    If you are on an SBG Scout, there's diminishing returns to upgrading, so no FOMO if you stick with your current ride. You are going to get a bit more of everything that bike does. I went for it because I can, because I've owned all the Scouts, because it looks sexy. If I were on pre SBG post OG, I'd be listing my bike on PB first thing after a demo.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BluePitch View Post
    Yes, I have owned several VPP bikes. I used to have a Nomad 3, which wasn't the greatest climber, it sat low in its sag and didn't have enough mid support. It got the job done, and was rideable/manageable. They have addressed these issues with the N4 and its lower mounted shock. I currently have a Bronson V3 which is a much better climber than my Nomad 3 despite having similar travel figures. This also has the lower mounted shock and it has a ton of mid support which makes the bike ride high in its travel. Far more efficient climber, especially when you consider its 160/150 travel.

    OG Scout and SBG Scout were not bad climbing bikes. I think this had more to do with the lack of travel out back. 125 or 130 there is not a lot of travel to wallow around in the mid support. The suspension is active, it tends to bob a little. For me the SBG Scout was the best slow speed technical climbing bike I have owned until a little while ago. The SBG really put you in a position where you were over the pedals, weight on the handlebars, and it was very easy to balance/track-stand because of the body positioning. It was never super efficient, or speedy. It was more of a keep the momentum going and lumber you way to the top. That being said I also owned a 5010 V2 that had similar travel to the Scout and the 5010 was an efficient and sporty climber. Each pedal stroke had a purpose. 5010 V3 is supposed to be and even better climber after they addressed the geo figures and got it up to today's standards.
    Thanks for the input, really has me goin between the two this, 5010v3 or the Scout 2020. Tough choice, much prefer the scout looks and do fancy a change from my nomad, it never felt very lively to me.

  92. #92
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    Quote Originally Posted by robj20 View Post
    Thanks for the input, really has me goin between the two this, 5010v3 or the Scout 2020. Tough choice, much prefer the scout looks and do fancy a change from my nomad, it never felt very lively to me.
    Tough choice. Safe bet would be the 5010. SC tends to be a little on the conservative side, not on design, but GEO. It will be a great bike but itís not radical. Scout is on the other spectrum. Radical GEO, kind of radical design(SBG and fork offset).

    Plenty of real world reviews on the 5010 so you kind of know what your gonna get.

    Scout we are seeing some reviews, but you should take the plunge and tell us how it is!

    Each bike now has lifetime warranty support. Each company has great customer support. Compare build kits/compare prices.....see if thereís any determining factors there.

    Keep in mind I think next year if 5010 returns it may go to the lower link driven VPP. You may be buying a 5010 that is due for a refresh.

  93. #93
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    Quote Originally Posted by BluePitch View Post
    Tough choice. Safe bet would be the 5010. SC tends to be a little on the conservative side, not on design, but GEO. It will be a great bike but itís not radical. Scout is on the other spectrum. Radical GEO, kind of radical design(SBG and fork offset).

    Plenty of real world reviews on the 5010 so you kind of know what your gonna get.

    Scout we are seeing some reviews, but you should take the plunge and tell us how it is!

    Each bike now has lifetime warranty support. Each company has great customer support. Compare build kits/compare prices.....see if thereís any determining factors there.

    Keep in mind I think next year if 5010 returns it may go to the lower link driven VPP. You may be buying a 5010 that is due for a refresh.
    Yes and i really dont like the look of the SC with lower shock.

    Things i like about my Nomad are its ability to plow through, things i hate are its tough on the uphills, plus i never use all the travel.
    Im a slightly lazy rider also which has me leaning to the scout over the 5010, one thing that stick out about the 5010 is its great but you need to pick your line. I think the scout would allow me to be lazy still, while pedalling better than my nomad which has 160mm/170mm.

    I think come the time i will see if the shop near me will let me demo a scout even a short ride will tell me if i will like it.
    It would be frame only as well, move as much across as i can.

  94. #94
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    Quote Originally Posted by robj20 View Post
    Yes and i really dont like the look of the SC with lower shock.

    Things i like about my Nomad are its ability to plow through, things i hate are its tough on the uphills, plus i never use all the travel.
    Im a slightly lazy rider also which has me leaning to the scout over the 5010, one thing that stick out about the 5010 is its great but you need to pick your line. I think the scout would allow me to be lazy still, while pedalling better than my nomad which has 160mm/170mm.

    I think come the time i will see if the shop near me will let me demo a scout even a short ride will tell me if i will like it.
    It would be frame only as well, move as much across as i can.
    5010 is not a plow bike.....I donít think Scout V3 will be either. I think it will be more pick a line, than plow a line. Maybe some margin of error but I think itís going to be a bike you have to be mindful of, not full speed ahead. But yeah it should pedal much better than Nomad going up.

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    Quote Originally Posted by BluePitch View Post
    5010 is not a plow bike.....I donít think Scout V3 will be either. I think it will be more pick a line, than plow a line. Maybe some margin of error but I think itís going to be a bike you have to be mindful of, not full speed ahead. But yeah it should pedal much better than Nomad going up.
    My first bike was a Reign X. That bike just floating over everything. It was boring. Don't think this scout is like that. But depends on your trails too.

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    Quote Originally Posted by fitek View Post
    My first bike was a Reign X. That bike just floating over everything. It was boring. Don't think this scout is like that. But depends on your trails too.

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    OG Scout surprised me on it's capability, SBG Scout was even better, V3 should be really capable. For its limited travel, it certainly is made for the downs!

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    I had a v3 5010 and a v3 Bronson last season. Still have the Bronson. I liked them both but needed some extra money so I put them both up for sale and figured i'd keep the one that didn't sell. Which turned out to be the Bronson. Anyway, I miss that 5010. I grabbed it 90% of the time over the Bronson when I went to ride. Was just more fun, poppy, playful, easier to climb and almost as capable. I even took that thing the bike park for some decent sized jump trails. Obviously the chunky stuff would overwhelm it fairly quick. The 5010 is due for a refresh next season and that might be the the ultimate sweet spot for me if they make it just a little more aggressive geo. I just have bike fever so dang bad that I need to fix what ails me.. and that's hopefully the scout! Even though it has really aggressive geo i'm hoping that progressive suspension keeps it fun! From others on here, it sounds pretty poppy! If you're a lazy rider and the nomad is a little much, then I bet the scout would fit you better than the 5010. Unless you waited for the v4 5010. But no clue what their plans are for that. Or if Evil decides to update The Calling, and drop it this season, that could be an option. It's definitely due for a refresh.

  98. #98
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbbg View Post
    I had a v3 5010 and a v3 Bronson last season. Still have the Bronson. I liked them both but needed some extra money so I put them both up for sale and figured i'd keep the one that didn't sell. Which turned out to be the Bronson. Anyway, I miss that 5010. I grabbed it 90% of the time over the Bronson when I went to ride. Was just more fun, poppy, playful, easier to climb and almost as capable. I even took that thing the bike park for some decent sized jump trails. Obviously the chunky stuff would overwhelm it fairly quick. The 5010 is due for a refresh next season and that might be the the ultimate sweet spot for me if they make it just a little more aggressive geo. I just have bike fever so dang bad that I need to fix what ails me.. and that's hopefully the scout! Even though it has really aggressive geo i'm hoping that progressive suspension keeps it fun! From others on here, it sounds pretty poppy! If you're a lazy rider and the nomad is a little much, then I bet the scout would fit you better than the 5010. Unless you waited for the v4 5010. But no clue what their plans are for that. Or if Evil decides to update The Calling, and drop it this season, that could be an option. It's definitely due for a refresh.
    I've had a Bronson V3 now for two seasons and was looking for a bike that was more playful. I was hoping the Scout V3 was going to be it, however, it looks like it could match/replace/be more capable than the Bronson!

    It's gotta much longer wheelbase, slacker HA, much longer reach, but the STA is the same, chainstay length is the same....and with only 10mm of difference in travel, I think the Scout V3 is more of a replacement for my Bronson vs picking up something more playful.

    Maybe the suspension kinematics have something magical going on, however, I'm kind of in an "over-biking" trend, where I pick a bike that is way more than I need for 90% of the time. I think Scout V3 follows that trend.

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    I'm not gonna lie....I would buy this bike on just looks alone. It is just drop dead sex on wheels!

    Scout V3 Build Thread-p5pb18335170.jpg

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    Oh, I thought the STA was steeper on the Scout. Good points though, you're probably right. More of replacement than a change to something more playful. Maybe i should just wait for v4 5010. Thanks for the input!

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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbbg View Post
    Oh, I thought the STA was steeper on the Scout. Good points though, you're probably right. More of replacement than a change to something more playful. Maybe i should just wait for v4 5010. Thanks for the input!
    It is steeper. Depending on where you set your seat post though. I think that TR is using a certain saddle height to achieve the Effective STA. Not everyone is going to set their saddle height the same. The difference may be negligible, lower seat height, slacker angle. Both bikes have a pretty steep HTA in relation to reach I guess.

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    Im curious how's the Scout in 150\160 setup will compared to the Bronson v3 (in low setting)?

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    That's the setting i've had my Bronson in since I built it. I'm hoping the scout is more playful. I think somebody above, or somewhere, mentioned that the progressive suspension design the scout has should feel more playful than the linear design of the Bronson. That's pretty much the one piece of info i'm reallly hoping is true. Also, hopefully having just a little less travel should help that feeling. Have a buyer for the Bronson so I might be buying the scout today.. Hard time deciding on the color.. Kind of boring colors.

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    I edited my last 3 hour ride down to 5 minutes. Still pitching forward, though less than before.
    https://youtu.be/ySSzaPVRKKM

    I did the jump lines better on the SBG Scout (I did the same ride w/ a GoPro on before I moved all the parts forward, for a baseline), though I think that's down to the suspension tuning, but the rest was more fun on this Scout.

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    Thanks for sharing! Where are these trails?!? Awesome!

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    Quote Originally Posted by fitek View Post
    I edited my last 3 hour ride down to 5 minutes. Still pitching forward, though less than before.
    https://youtu.be/ySSzaPVRKKM

    I did the jump lines better on the SBG Scout (I did the same ride w/ a GoPro on before I moved all the parts forward, for a baseline), though I think that's down to the suspension tuning, but the rest was more fun on this Scout.
    Really cool trail system. You west coasters have all the fun. I would love a Scout on those trails!

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    Quote Originally Posted by fitek View Post
    I'm about 143 lbs and pumped the rear shock to 150psi. I forgot my calipers but eyeballed it at 25 percent. There are many adjustments on the X2. I just left them all in the middle, which is where they were out of the box. I slowed down the rear rebounds (yes, there are two) one click after a few runs, and sped up the front one click.
    We definitely recommend measuring sag with a ruler or caliper. The suggested range isn't huge, and wherever you end up liking it best, it's nice to be able to repeat it accurately via a measurement. It is also worth noting that the stock 205mm x 57.5mm shock still has the same visible travel area as a 65mm shock. It will just stop short due to the internal spacers. At full travel it will appear there is "more left" on the shock body.

    Quote Originally Posted by fitek View Post
    After the black line, including some nice cases, I checked the travel o-ring. I used 80 percent. Pretty sure I knock that o ring off on the SBG Scout on a normal ride. Maybe I should have run higher pressure on the SBG? But then IIRC the suspension behaves funky. Carbon Scout is more forgiving on the setup.
    As mentioned above... you might actually be using more than 80% of your travel. On the Super Deluxe equipped bikes you will NOT be able to knock the o-ring off the shock body. The RockShox shocks have a small indicator mark showing the full travel range. On the Fox shock you would need to eyeball 80% of 57.5mm but the shock will look like there is a lot more left. Difficult to tell how much you have used without measuring.

    Just clarifying those couple points!

    Also, the switch on our Float X2 has been custom tuned to be a lighter "firm" mode than a stock aftermarket Float X2. We did that so the firmer lever setting would be more usable on trail than a full lockout or as an option for a firmer dirt jump mode, etc.

    PS: We are working on updating the website in the not too distant future with some recommended base line settings for all those Float X2 adjusters. We know there are a lot of them, and it can be overwhelming.

  108. #108
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    Is the peformance elite x2 missing one the the adjustments that the factory x2 has? HSC maybe, can't remember.

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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbbg View Post
    Is the peformance elite x2 missing one the the adjustments that the factory x2 has? HSC maybe, can't remember.
    Performance Elite does not have high speed compression/rebound adjustments, only low speed.

  110. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by Transition Bikes View Post
    We definitely recommend measuring sag with a ruler or caliper. The suggested range isn't huge, and wherever you end up liking it best, it's nice to be able to repeat it accurately via a measurement. It is also worth noting that the stock 205mm x 57.5mm shock still has the same visible travel area as a 65mm shock. It will just stop short due to the internal spacers. At full travel it will appear there is "more left" on the shock body.



    As mentioned above... you might actually be using more than 80% of your travel. On the Super Deluxe equipped bikes you will NOT be able to knock the o-ring off the shock body. The RockShox shocks have a small indicator mark showing the full travel range. On the Fox shock you would need to eyeball 80% of 57.5mm but the shock will look like there is a lot more left. Difficult to tell how much you have used without measuring.

    Just clarifying those couple points!

    Also, the switch on our Float X2 has been custom tuned to be a lighter "firm" mode than a stock aftermarket Float X2. We did that so the firmer lever setting would be more usable on trail than a full lockout or as an option for a firmer dirt jump mode, etc.

    PS: We are working on updating the website in the not too distant future with some recommended base line settings for all those Float X2 adjusters. We know there are a lot of them, and it can be overwhelming.
    Thanks!

    And good call on the lighter firm mode. Lockout is useless on a bike like this.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk

  111. #111
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    Quote Originally Posted by mtbbg View Post
    Thanks for sharing! Where are these trails?!? Awesome!
    Galbraith in Bellingham. Gravel road climb to Cedar Dust jumps, then climb Bandito to Tough Love. Up the road to Mohawk to mullet to Cheech and Chongs to meth lab.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk

  112. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by BluePitch View Post
    Performance Elite does not have high speed compression/rebound adjustments, only low speed.
    This may be wrong, I think X2 performance ďeliteĒ has HSLS compression, HSLS rebound. I believe X2 performance doesnít have HS compression/rebound. I forgot about the ďeliteĒ model.

  113. #113
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    Quote Originally Posted by BluePitch View Post
    This may be wrong, I think X2 performance ďeliteĒ has HSLS compression, HSLS rebound. I believe X2 performance doesnít have HS compression/rebound. I forgot about the ďeliteĒ model.
    That is correct. It's not really a standard option, our shock is a custom "Performance Elite" model and I am not sure if any other brands are doing it. It's the same damper as the "Factory" shock with full high and low speed adjustments on both compression and rebound. The "Performance" shock is the more common all black Float X2 you see out there, and it only has adjustment for the low speed compression/rebound.

  114. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by fitek View Post
    Galbraith in Bellingham. Gravel road climb to Cedar Dust jumps, then climb Bandito to Tough Love. Up the road to Mohawk to mullet to Cheech and Chongs to meth lab.

    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    Seriously....those trails look amazing....and the fact you can pedal up to earn your downs is perfection. We have to take a chairlift to have access to trails like that. West Coast riding is so different than east coast. I wish I could hit a trail system like that for everyday riding! Itís 2hrs in a car, buy a ticket and hit a MTB Park to have that kind of trail. Scout V3 with trails like that......bliss!

  115. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by BluePitch View Post
    Seriously....those trails look amazing....and the fact you can pedal up to earn your downs is perfection. We have to take a chairlift to have access to trails like that. West Coast riding is so different than east coast. I wish I could hit a trail system like that for everyday riding! Itís 2hrs in a car, buy a ticket and hit a MTB Park to have that kind of trail. Scout V3 with trails like that......bliss!
    I'd take a chairlift if I could



    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk

  116. #116
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    Liking the sound of this bike more and more.

    This is my sort of riding, nothing too extreme.

    https://youtu.be/gizz4dgB7Qc?t=49

    Im also pretty certain i would get the medium frame.

  117. #117
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    Quote Originally Posted by BluePitch View Post
    I'm not gonna lie....I would buy this bike on just looks alone. It is just drop dead sex on wheels!

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Aint it though, sweet looking ride... Can't wait for the bigger brother

  118. #118
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    Quote Originally Posted by fitek View Post
    I'd take a chairlift if I could



    Sent from my SM-G955U using Tapatalk
    To give you an idea of the type of riding we normally do I found this video. It's not my video, but it gives you an idea of the terrain where we ride frequently. The funny thing is the videos owner chose to run it at 2x speed to make it easier/better/less boring to watch? Daniels Road is typical Upstate NY old school gnar. A long, low, slack bike is tough to ride here.


  119. #119
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    Just found another good review. Posted yesterday.

    https://www.singletracks.com/mtb-new...t-ride-review/

  120. #120
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    Great trails guys! Here's my local ones, not my videos. One is a bike park, lift access, but its 30 min from me and I go all the time. the other is a local trail 15 min from me. Scout gonna love these!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PK2u9cJ0CSA&t=111s

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QJdL1iSEsWo

  121. #121
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    That review is really saying all the right things to me some the perfect bike for me.
    Play full, good enough uphill and great at the descents.

  122. #122
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    Western States, West Coast riding is so damn different! Jealous.......

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