Want to get a Freeride park going- Mtbr.com
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  1. #1
    mtbr member
    Reputation: kadeater's Avatar
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    Want to get a Freeride park going

    Does anyone have any suggestions on how to get the ball rolling on a freeride park? I live in Logan Utah and think it would be a good idea. I have heard that there are some illegal trails but those don't fly too well with the powers that be. If anyone has any suggestions or if you live in the area and want to get envolved let me know.

    Joel

  2. #2
    Don't worry, be happy!
    Reputation: formica's Avatar
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    short answer:

    It's all about communication with the powers that be, and planning. There's no quick way to do it.

    long answer:
    You'll find the IMBA web site is a good place to start. There are examples from fr parks that already exist, from photos of builds to how the groups have addresses legal/liability issues.

    You want to be organized, present yourself with a group that appears to be somewhat organized and thinking things through; doing your homework. Find out who owns/manages the property and have a plan for meeting with them. Again, tons of articles and models for what to do/say on the IMBA site. Familiarize yourself with the state laws for your state as they apply to recreation, liability, and landowners, again there's a list by state ( I think) on the IMBA site. Many times property owners have more protection than they initially think they do.

    Look for the Whistler manual that you can download. It's got some great stuff in there, specs for beginner, intermediate and advanced level builds, guidlenes for flow manangment, building tips ( use deck construction methods, no nails)

    We've gotten the green light here to pretty much build whatever we want. Our area has a lot of natural terrain ; granite outcrops and so on, and people have been biking here for years. I did a presentation to the City Park board about mountain biking, and we've met with the city and the IMBA Trail Care crew with a all around thumbs-up for bikers.

    It's not a process of instant gratification. While we've gotten the OK, they will not provide any support in the form of money or labor. We've got to collect building materials, draw up our plans, submit them for a OK, get people together etc. We will also be applying for a Kona FR grant after the first of the year.

    Here's some of the organizational things we did that really made an impression on the powers that be:

    1. we have our own insurance
    2. we are working on tax exempt status so we can get donations of materials
    3 our plan includes beginner, intermediate and advance, for all abilities
    4 we did a huge site clean up, took 18 truckloads of trash off the property


    formica

  3. #3

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    please post a link to that manual. i need it so badly.

  4. #4
    Don't worry, be happy!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sudo
    please post a link to that manual. i need it so badly.
    I don't have the link any more, I'd have to google same as you.
    It's called Whistler Trail Standards, Environmental and Technical Features.
    I found it originally via the IMBA site. There's a lot of stuff there.

    It's huge pdf file.

    formica

  5. #5
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    How did you do it?

    formica it seems you are in the process of actually getting a freeride park going. I think we have the opportunity in our community as well. I'd like to talk more about how you approached the politicians, and got some money.

    The overall plan makes sense, and I've ready the IMBA material, including their latest Freeride issue of there newsletter. It is one thing to get everything together and have a well thoughout plan, it is another to actually get someone to say yes. It is still another to get money to do it. I'm interested in learning more about how your group did these things.

    Also what area are you in? It is very useful to be able to have as a reference somewhere that has already blazed the trail.

    Also please contact me privately, I'd like to get more in depth than a forum like this allows.

  6. #6
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    Check the socal board

    There's a guy named ciaran that posts on the downhill and socal boards, and also on ridemonkey, that has been working with management at a ski resort to develop legal downhill to replace Big Bear.

    Going under the umbrella of a ski resort adds to the complications, but means you can operate under their liability wing, so to speak

  7. #7

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    please take the time to look through imba's resources. It's a huge database of info you will definitely need to take the time and read it all. You'll be more excited than ever.

    http://www.imba.com/cgi-bin/search/s...erms=Whistler+


    Joe T
    PA IMBA rep

  8. #8
    Don't worry, be happy!
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    First of all, most of the time we ( our club) feeling like we are winging it. It just looks like we know what we are doing, and really, we haven't gotten anything done yet. But we are working on it.

    We've got a couple of things going on in the right direction.
    -The area we want to build in is mostly a city park property that has been almost exclusively used by mtbers for many years. The local and regional race series host DH races several times a season. There is a strong history of established bike use.
    -Our club "adopted" the area under the city's Adopt a Park program. They are thrilled to have volunteers to do anything up there, it's kind of an unknown city park property.
    -I think WA state has pretty good recreational liabililty laws. There is some material on the IMBA site about each state, somewhere.
    -we've got support from the bikers within the park dept.


    Another thing that is in our favor is that outdoor rec is really big here right now. There are a coupld of new regional rail-trails that are bringing in tourist $$ like you wouldn't believe; and a whitewater park is being developed within the city and more. So, the powers that be are getting it about supporting recreation. Also, a ski area about 60 miles away is really gung ho on lift serve.

    I think the biggest thing we are doing is establishing credibility and visibility as a club. There's the new highly visible trail we just finished at the local state park which is also a big bike area. We cleaned up a ton of trash at the city park. We've done trail work days with the boy scouts. The local papers have been promoting our activities. We've gone to community outdoor events with our table and display, and we go to meeting of other trail/recreation oriented groups.

    Earlier this spring, I was invited, as the club representative to go before the Parks Board and give a power point presentation about biking in this area. It was under the auspices of what the club has done with the adopt a park program, but we went for more. We stressed what the club had done so far, with our clean up and trail maintenance, we showed how heavily the area is already used by bikers; that it is a regional destination already for the DH/FR crowd, the racing; and then we showed some examples of what's been done in other stunt/fr parks, and talked about what we wanted to do. What we said we want to do up there is build trails/stunts for all abilities, not just the you miss, you die kinds of things that are there now. We stressed education both for user conflict, and for recognizing legal building of these things. I showed examples of well built stunts stressing that's what we want, and examples of crap builds ( rotten pallets, plywood etc) that we don't want. The presentation was incredibly well received: at the end I was waiting for question about the photo of the guy hucking the Rushmore drop or similar, and the only question was where we got our training for trail work.
    ( and then they showed reruns on city channel 5 for forever.... )

    So what are we doing now? We are gathering information. I am amassing a photo collection of stunt builds from all over the place. There is the whistler guide.

    We are getting our 501C3 so we can beg money and materials, of which we have neither. We should have this done by the end of the year. I think this will help a lot. We've got some plans drawn up. We'll be walking the park boundaries with a surveyor so we've got a pretty good idea of where they are.

    The plan is to hit it big with actually getting our multi ability level ladder trail going in the spring. We've got the OK to do it, we just need to get everything together. Of course, we'll apply for a grant when the next ones are announced.

    Sorry for going on. I think it's good when peoplel share what different clubs are doing for ideas, and inspritation. Our club isn't even a year old yet!

    Formica

  9. #9
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    Plans?

    Quote Originally Posted by formica
    ...We've got some plans drawn up...
    One of the sticking points for us with land managers is/will be designs for technical trail features, especially stuff that is "engineered" -- either placed on/near the tread (log ride, etc.) or constructed to be the tread (ladder bridge, etc.)...

    Short of USFS backcountry design standards (which could be restrictive), what plans/design approaches have others found to be useful? Care to share any designs/photos of natural features?

    Thanks in advance!

  10. #10
    Don't worry, be happy!
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    Quote Originally Posted by fully
    One of the sticking points for us with land managers is/will be designs for technical trail features, especially stuff that is "engineered" -- either placed on/near the tread (log ride, etc.) or constructed to be the tread (ladder bridge, etc.)...

    Short of USFS backcountry design standards (which could be restrictive), what plans/design approaches have others found to be useful? Care to share any designs/photos of natural features?

    Thanks in advance!
    if you search around the IMBA site, you can download the Whistler building manual. It's hard to get more official than that.

  11. #11
    sunnyside up
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    Here's the manual

    Quote Originally Posted by Sudo
    please post a link to that manual. i need it so badly.
    go to http://www.whistlercycling.org/default.cfm and click on reading room on the left menu. You will find the trail standards on that page.

    Patty Ciesla
    Executive Director,
    NorCAMBA
    http://www.norcamba.org
    "...So forget all your duties, oh yeah! Fat bottomed girls, they'll be riding today..." Freddie Mercury

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