Tree-puller like a pipe-wrench- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 13 of 13
  1. #1
    Enthusiast
    Reputation: JonathanGennick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    5,359

    Tree-puller like a pipe-wrench

    Very good trail-building evening today. Guy leading the work asked me to search for a good tree puller device. He saw one once that worked like a pipe-wrench in that that harder one pulled, the tighter the device grabbed.

    Does anyone know of such a thing?

    Gratuitous photos below. First one's my son. Second is my neighbor.

    Name:  Jeff.jpg
Views: 4663
Size:  128.1 KB

    Name:  Mark.jpg
Views: 3431
Size:  117.6 KB

  2. #2
    mtbr member
    Reputation: HypNoTic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    345
    I build trails for moose & beaver
    PTBA member

  3. #3
    Enthusiast
    Reputation: JonathanGennick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    5,359
    Looks impressive. Thanks! I'll pass on the link to my friend.

  4. #4
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    May 2004
    Posts
    2,058
    I've used weed wrenches and they do need a bigger foot, or bring a piece of wood.
    There's a big difference between ripping and skidding. Those who skid don't know how to ride.

  5. #5
    Enthusiast
    Reputation: JonathanGennick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    5,359
    HypNoTic sold a Pullerbear. My friend bought one of those.

    What a bizarre website. Tool looks great though.

    My Rogue Hoes should show up today. I imagine the Pullerbear should make it in a week's time. Our trail bee on next Thursday should be a fun time, what with some brand new tools to play with.

  6. #6
    Dirt Monkey
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    278
    We have used a "weed wrench" in a hardwood forest setting while clearing/grubbing trail and it was not as effective/efficient and much heavier than a rogue hoe for the task. While the tool is a novel concept, I would recommend spending the money on buying more rogue hoes because of their multipurpose nature.

  7. #7
    Enthusiast
    Reputation: JonathanGennick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    5,359
    Well, aero, it's too late. My friend already placed his order.

    My own four Rogue Hoes arrived today though. So we'll eventually be able to make the experiment and see which works best in our conditions.

  8. #8
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jan 2004
    Posts
    3,197
    This one falls into what I call my "shut up and buy it" category of products:

    WaltDizzy here and my self have spent no shortage of time with it. If you take the time to make a 10 ft corridor before you cut your trail the rewards will be many. The obvious is no punji stucks but then comes less and easier maintenance. What may not be so obvious is a well prepared 10 foot corridor lets you cut or move your tread in the obvious best places.

    Weed Wrench Company

  9. #9
    mtbr member
    Reputation: hankthespacecowboy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Posts
    540
    Any feedback on how this tool work in drier, rockier, more compacted soils (high desert West)? Looks like it might work better in soils with more organic matter to keep the roots loose.

  10. #10
    Enthusiast
    Reputation: JonathanGennick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    5,359
    Quote Originally Posted by bitflogger View Post
    WaltDizzy here and my self have spent no shortage of time with it. If you take the time to make a 10 ft corridor before you cut your trail the rewards will be many. The obvious is no punji stucks but then comes less and easier maintenance.
    I don't really see us clearing 10-foot corridors. But I sure do hear you on the punji sticks. Went out alone yesterday so I could take my time and get used to cutting bench with the new Rogue Hoes. (Spent about 90 minutes and got maybe 8-10 feet done). Someone had gone through with a rotary blade trimmer and cut off a bunch of saplings at trail level. They had cut off to the side where the actual track probably won't run, but I did need to work on that side to get the bench to slope properly. What a freakin' pain. I'd be hoeing along thinking I had a clear shot, and wham! I'd hit one of those submerged roots.

    Gratuitous photo below. The eight feet that I benched is the brighter ground closer to the bike. It's not perfect, but I'll get better w/practice.

    Tree-puller like a pipe-wrench-bench03.jpg

  11. #11
    mtbr member
    Reputation: hado_pv's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Posts
    696
    Cutting saplings at ground level is a mistake all rookies make. They realize the error of their ways soon... A Pulaski can be pretty effective for removing them, but once they're cut that close nothing is easy.
    http://facebook.com/CharlemontTrails
    NEMBA Past President...

  12. #12
    Enthusiast
    Reputation: JonathanGennick's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Posts
    5,359
    Quote Originally Posted by hado_pv View Post
    Cutting saplings at ground level is a mistake all rookies make. They realize the error of their ways soon... A Pulaski can be pretty effective for removing them, but once they're cut that close nothing is easy.
    I remember when the guy did it. His logic was that he was cutting outside of where the tread would eventually run. Being inexperienced myself, that seemed plausible. I can sure see the problem now though.

  13. #13
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Jun 2011
    Posts
    66
    Quote Originally Posted by bitflogger View Post
    This one falls into what I call my "shut up and buy it" category of products:

    WaltDizzy here and my self have spent no shortage of time with it. If you take the time to make a 10 ft corridor before you cut your trail the rewards will be many. The obvious is no punji stucks but then comes less and easier maintenance. What may not be so obvious is a well prepared 10 foot corridor lets you cut or move your tread in the obvious best places.

    Weed Wrench Company
    Man. If you're cutting a 10 foot corridor.... you might as well drive a freaking bulldozer through there.

    Or a tractor. Or even just a garden tractor/ATV with a chain and brush-grubber to reduce impact on the land.

    I understand your logic, but if the clearing work is that wide, you can easily bring in power equipment to save on the ridiculous manual labor of clearing all saplings by hand for a 10 foot wide corridor. Also, I really like the intimate nature of most single-track, but that is situation-specific, obviously.

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.