Train Maint Glove Help- Mtbr.com
Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    a.k.a. MTBMaven
    Reputation: mtnfiend's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2004
    Posts
    1,750

    Trail Maint. Glove Help

    I have been using a pair of Mecanix gloves for the past year. They have been holding up well, that is not the problem. The problem is that I keep getting stabbed by Yucca. The tops of the gloves are mesh, allowing the Yucca to poke me.

    Many of you may not live/work/ride in areas where Yucca grow. Yucca grow on the ground and have narrow (1"-3") wide spikes that radiate out from a central "stalk." The tips of the spikes become very sharp as the plan matures.

    Two of us were stabbed in our hands yesterday while trying to remove them from the tread. We need to find a good glove to protect our hands from these darn things. The top of the glove needs to be thick. The old school all leather gloves are no good for me. I just get blister with those things. I would like something that is designed and fits like a mountain bike glove.

    Thanks in advance for the help.
    Last edited by mtnfiend; 04-08-2007 at 10:02 AM.
    I thought of that while riding my bicycle. ~ Albert Einstein on the theory of relativity

  2. #2
    banned
    Reputation: Box Elder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    1,324
    Try turning a pair of those leather gloves inside out. It makes them quite comfortable (no blisters) and makes them a size larger by moving the seams to the outside. I turn them inside out and then restitch them with fishing line to get longer life out of them.

    I have crews working in Thunderbird Park in Glendale, Arizona, and we have had some bad luck with the cactus. We had to scramble off the mountain a couple weeks ago when we were hit with a microburst (40mph winds and rain). One of our crew fell onto a Cholla cactus and had to be rushed to hospital. We tend to throw away gloves once they get cactus needles in them. Really, nothing can stop a cactus needle. Not even leather boots. Just whack those cactus with a pulaski and flip them way off the trail.
    Attached Images Attached Images

  3. #3
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Oct 2004
    Posts
    160

  4. #4
    banned
    Reputation: Box Elder's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    1,324
    Quote Originally Posted by splitter_66

    I'd like to see a photo of the palm of those gloves. They are extremely expensive and it is doubtful they would hold up any longer than any other leather glove while doing trail work. All the plastic knuckle protection is meaningless doing trail work. You want a glove that has triple stitching or maybe some heavy duty plastic all around the fingertips. Most people split open the seams long before they wear out the leather. I had crew members wear out gloves in two weeks. Those were heavy duty GSA leather gloves. I told them the leather was still fine if they'd just sew the seams back together.

    I've recently spent $30 and $40 for Carthart work gloves and heavy duty Home Depot work gloves. Both split apart in two weeks.

    Those mechanic gloves go for between $45-$75! They are basically leather gloves. Once you blow out the fingertips or split open the seams, they done. That could happen in a couple weeks.

    I still suggest buying $12 heavy duty GSA gloves, reversing them so the stitching is on the outside (for comfort), and then before you wear them even once, go get some 25 pound test line and double stitching the entire glove, using the existing holes already in the leather. They should last for months of continuous use.


    Photos include three gloves turned inside out and sewn with fishing line, plus two leather gloves before being turned inside out. Also a few shots of my international trail crew last week in Glendale, Arizona (Thunderbird Park).
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. #5
    mtbr member
    Reputation:
    Join Date
    Dec 2004
    Posts
    452

    Multiple types of gloves for trail building

    I solved the trail work glove problem by using several different pairs specialized for different tasks. I use anti-vibration gloves for when I am doing a lot of work with striking tools like pick mattocks and McLeods. My wrists and elbows feel a lot better after a long day. I use medium weight leather gloves when working with brush. They protect my hands from the brush and they provide sufficient protection when using saws or loppers. I have a super-heavy pair of leather gloves I use for serious rock work. Based on what the most likely tasks are for a trail work day, I take two pairs of gloves that are most likely to be needed. If I am doing a mix of things I usually just wear the medium weight leather gloves.

    I do agree with the idea of turning leather gloves inside out. I started doing it because my hands are a bit too large for XL leather gloves and turning them inside out makes them a half size larger. Turning them inside out also makes the gloves more comfortable IMO.

Members who have read this thread: 0

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  

THE SITE

ABOUT MTBR

VISIT US AT

© Copyright 2020 VerticalScope Inc. All rights reserved.